Bankside Loft by EBBA

Photography: Lorenzo Zandri

This apartment renovation in London’s Southbank area is designed by emerging architecture studio EBBA, headed by architect Benni Allan. Bankside Loft was conceived as an open-plan, smart interior. It cleverly makes the most of a relatively compact surface, while creating an impact through its overall aesthetic. To achieve this, two mezzanine spaces were created either side of the apartment block’s structural frame, which was stripped back and is now visible in the unit. Underneath the mezzanine areas, the architect placed the kitchen and bathroom. The mezzanines, which feel spacious and comfortable due to the original concrete structure’s especially high ceilings, house a bedroom and a study. The pine wood used for the joinery is treated with a white stain, creating a minimalist, yet soft effect in the apartment interior. 

Florfield Road Penthouse by Common Ground Workshop

Photography: Luca Piffaretti

Transforming an unassuming, contemporary residential block’s top level into a sleek and open, modern penthouse, this project is the brainchild of young and dynamic architecture studio Common Ground Workshop. The space, which is situated in the heart of London’s Hackney, is now wrapped in zinc cladding. It features smooth, high-quality materials inside and makes the most of the property’s large windows and sliding glass roof-terrace doors. Instilling spatial flexibility to this two-bedroom apartment, the architects favoured flowing, open-plan spaces, for both living and working. Quartz and timber surfaces, concrete-effect floor tiling and a frameless glass balustrade make for a minimalist, contemporary material palette. 

House by the Bailucchi by llabb

Photography: Anna Positano, Gaia Cambiaggi / Studio Campo

Designed to be flooded in Mediterranean light, this apartment interior in the northern Italian city of Genoa was designed by Luca Scardulla and Federico Robbiano of local architecture studio llabb. The concept combines a contemporary approach with the existing building’s period details. The property spans two floors and the architects focused on opening it up in order to allow light to travel to every corner. They also wanted to connect the two levels in a visually meaningful way. As a result, a dramatic staircase links everything together, with continuity ensured by a minimalist palette that mixes white plaster, exposed period features and sleek modern fittings, such as window frames and radiators. The owners, an international couple working in the creative industries, especially appreciate the craftmanship displayed in the construction and details (Scardulla and Robbiano originally established their business in 2013 as a carpentry workshop).

Home for the Arts by i29

Photography: i29 / Ewout Huibers

This striking apartment interior is located in a contemporary building in the former industrial area of northern Amsterdam. Conceived for clients – an art collector and a writer – who were very involved in the design process, the interior occupies a spacious, double-height unit. The architects, i29, completely gutted it to redesign from scratch. The architecture studio took the clients’ collection as a cue. ‘To display the enormous collection of art in the ultimate way was our starting point, so we designed double-height open cabinets to store most of the extravagant art pieces,’ say the design team. As a result, the apartment interior appears clean and minimalist, and features high-end bespoke joinery, including plinths and an impressive, tall bookcase. The last conceals a staircase, leading to the sleeping areas above the main, open-plan living space – which has a gallery feel, allowing the artwork to take centre stage. 

Icon Wood House by Henkin Shavit Design Studio

Photography: Assaf Pinchuk

This clever apartment interior design sits within a 1960s concrete residential building in Tel Aviv. When the client, a family of four, purchased the space on the 12th floor, the apartment was divided by three long and narrow rooms in a layout that felt dated and unwieldy. They came to local architects Henkin Shavit Design Studio to transform the interior into a bright, unified and contemporary home. The architects tore down nearly all the partition walls to reveal a generous, open-plan area. This contains a number of functions. It includes the living room, a kitchen, a spacious work area and the children’s room, playfully placed within a freestanding, timber, house-shaped structure. The parents’ bedroom, bathroom and a guest bedroom are situated off it, slightly separately. A neutral material and colour palette of greys and whites, timber and concrete, ensures the furniture and the daily life within the apartment become the highlight of this home. 

§