The debut furniture collection of Belgian interior designer Élise Van Thuyne consists of three armoirés, a large-scale mirrored wall (made from polished, 100-year-old mirrors) and some smaller objects, combining a refined aesthetic with the rawness of materials such as nickel-plated or matte black steel and untreated brass. ‘I wanted to see for myself whether my creations could survive without a context,’ she explains. Each armoire explores a modular system offering multiple possibilities, seamlessly transforming into office furniture, bars or bookshelves.

The pieces feature exposed joints and clever construction tricks; some of the large cabinets are held together by a single screw, joints are exposed, and the collection exudes a sense of industrial functionality. ‘Colour is an easy way to seduce the eye. I wanted to go beyond that and stay as pure as I could be in my designs,’ says Van Thuyne, explaining that materials were the focus of her work. ‘These materials continue to alter, they change with use and time, they become more beautiful.’ 

As originally featured in the January 2017 issue of Wallpaper* (W*214)

RELATED TOPICS: FURNITURE DESIGN