Milan Fashion Week S/S 2017 womenswear editor's picks

Arthur Arbesser
Arthur Arbesser: The Viennese designer Arthur Arbesser loves a crisp shirt, a structured jacket and boxy two-piece trouser suits. He played with vertical panelling, shiny fabrics and optical prints to bring out the most in them for this S/S 2017 collection
(Image credit: Jason Lloyd Evans)

Bertoni 1949: Timeless design, Italian craftsmanship, Moroccan-inspired colours and a hand-painted wooden print, this Bertoni 1949 collection inspired travel to Morocco and beyond

Bertoni bags


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Bally: This summery hued collection by Bally was one that offered classic styles as well as a few new designs, such as a platform Geisha-inspired sandal. The accessories complimented the equally colourful and elegant ready-to-wear line

Bally


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So Milano: Aldo Carpinteri and Giordano Ollari, founders of the new alternative retail concept So Milano on Piazza Risorgimento, left the opening honours to J.W.Anderson. The designer filled the space’s spherical volumes with bags, shoes and clothing from his A/W 2016 collection and adorned black-and white photographs of classical marble sculptures with jewellery – turning the historical palazzo into an imaginative and unconventional shopping platform

So Milano


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Sara Battaglia: This season the bag designer presented not only a new collection of bags in true Sara Battaglia style, in a second room, a row of mannequins showed her first clothing collection of 1950s-inspired feminine pieces that go perfectly with her colourful, geometric bag designs

New collection bags


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Agnona: Imagining a collection for a ‘Swan of today’ Agnona’s designer Simon Holloway presented a romantic and sensual collection of fine cashmere and fluid silks in delicate, soft colours

Agnona


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Jimmy Choo: If we can’t spend enough time in nature, Jimmy Choo will bring nature to us. Surrounded by origami hummingbirds and orchids, the brand presented a vibrant collection of feather-inspired designs and tropical colours

Jimmy Choo


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Valextra: Valextra is taking its whole world of classic handbags to a new level. A terrific presentation was matched with sharp new graphic treatments on each handbag

Valextra


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Antonio Marras: Antonio Marras shook it up with a Sixties rock’n’roll collection inspired by the work of Malian photographer Malick Sibidé. A finale of twisting models in waisted dresses and flared skirts brightened the already sunny day

Antonio Marras


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Giuseppe Zanotti: This season, the famous work of Botticelli was the starting point of Giuseppe Zanotti’s design process. Set in fauna and flora, the brand presented a collection of feminine yet powerful heels and flats

Giuseppe Zanotti


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Gabriele Colangelo: Colangelo was in an arty mood for spring, bringing handcrafted techniques to his wide-ribboned woven frocks, dresses hanging with flaps and collages of lacework that climbed over tunics and trousers, that were worn with flat, pointed shoe-booties with cut-out sides.

Gabriele Colangelo


(Image credit: Jason Lloyd Evans)

Church’s: This season marks the debut of the women’s version of Church’s classic, the Grafton. Originally a men’s style, the new version will be available in four different colours

Church's footwear


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Tod’s: For spring, Tod’s skipped its usual runway presentation and instead created a series of tabeaux vivants staged inside Milan’s PAC museum. The Italian brand’s classic pieces and traditional leather good materials in neutral tones looked lovely in clustered groups of real models. But the real winner were the diorama boxes that showed only a flash of toe-tapping or walking feet wearing Tod’s moccassins that were accompanied by live human gloved hands that stroked each piece like a magic show.

Tod's collection


(Image credit: Jason Lloyd Evans)

Bvlgari: The Serpenti and Bvlgari Bvlgari collections captured the geometry of a sculpted garden and the sensuality of a serpent. The matching eyewear and silk scarfs come in popping colours and kaleidoscopic prints on python skin

Bvlgari


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Krizia: Long solitary walks and spending time at the historical archive gave Zhu Chongyun, owner and creative director of Krizia, her inspiration for Summer 2017. The result is a collection where East meets West, where past meets present and where fluidity meets sharp pleating.

Krizia


(Image credit: Jason Lloyd Evans)

Furla: Set in an urban field of flowers, Furla presented an energetic and colourful Field of Imagination collection. From bags to scarves and espadrilles to the brand’s first women’s backpack, each design comes in a range of exclusive nature inspired prints

Furla


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Herno: Herno’s colourful collection of down jackets, raincoats and coats are sure to brighten up any rainy day. The designs come in a blaze of greens, blues and yellows as well strong graphic prints and are made using the finest Italian technical fabrics

Herno’s colourful collection


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Woolrich: In collaboration with the Olivades atelier, Woolrich presented a trans-seasonal collection in which firm fabrics and soft silhouettes come together. The different styles of outerwear and casualwear come in different blues as well as an exclusive camouflage print

Woolrich Collection


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Sergio Rossi: This season marks a fresh start for the Italian shoe brand as it harks back to its roots and authentic aesthetics. The contemporary collection was inspired by the graphic style from the 1990s, resulting in a part moccasin, part slipper

Sergio Rossi


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Giorgio Armani: ’Emotions of the athletic body’, an exhibition curated by Mr. Armani himself in his dedicated art space Armani Silos – fitted out with red running track flooring for the occasion – saw large-scale black and white photographs of sportswomen and men in perfect aesthetic action.

Emotions of the athletic body


(Image credit: Antonio Camera)

Fratelli Rossetti: Rossetti is a leader when it comes to loafers. Here, at Palazzo Cusani, pairs of them, in a rainbow of colours, were arranged on plinths set in a circle, with models having fun on swings and relaxing on loungers within a grassy playground.

Palazzo Cusani


(Image credit: Antonio Camera)

Ports 1961: The signature yanked-off-center-tailoring at Ports 1961 got a further shake-up this season with bold strokes of striping, lending a graphic and even colorful touch to this brand’s usually minimal codes

Ports 1961


(Image credit: Jason Lloyd Evans)

Kalmar: A band of beauties and their mid-century furnishings gather in the front yard of a Milanese palazzo for the debut of the London based brand Kalmar

Kalmar collections


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Philipp Plein (opens in new tab)From marching bands to Fergie in a convertable, Plein’s ’Alice in Ghettoland’ show was a wild ride. Videography: Antonio Camera

Fashion Features Editor

Jack Moss is the Fashion Features Editor at Wallpaper*. Having previously held roles at 10, 10 Men and AnOther magazines, he joined the team in 2022. His work has a particular focus on the moments where fashion and style intersect with other creative disciplines – among them art and design – as well as championing a new generation of international talent and profiling the industry’s leading figures and brands.