Photographer Oskar Proctor, was born and raised in London. He trained as an assistant for 10 years and is now working internationally in the real of interiors and still life photography.

Oskar Proctor photography

Photography: Oskar Proctor

Wallpaper*: Describe your style of work and process.
Oskar Proctor:
Pace is key to my process. It’s about building a form of momentum in which an interior shoot provides inspiration that can flow into a still-life set, which then brings something new to taking someone’s portrait. This means I have to stay very flexible and present to whatever environment I’m in.

If too many preconceptions are brought to a shoot it can be stifling and the unexpected is often what makes a good photograph. Any opportunity to bring in just a drop of strangeness is always welcome too, being able to push things outside the expected is something I’m really keen on.


‘Any opportunity to bring in just a drop of strangeness is always welcome.’ 



W*: Who or what made you want to be a photographer?
OP:


If I could easily describe why I do it then I may not have to take pictures at all. That said, it seems to me that images, hopefully my images, describe a dialogue between photographer and subject which can express something beyond words. This is so important to me as pretty early on in my life I discovered that photography was the language I am most at ease communicating with. Fortunately I grew up in an environment where the potentials of creativity were recognised and valued. 


Oskar Proctor photography

Photography: Oskar Proctor



Todd Eberle was an inspiration to me, he’s successfully equal parts architectural, portrait and interiors photographer. His book Empire of Space has always stuck in my mind for it’s mix of modernism and minimalism.




W*: What is currently on your radar?
OP:
Ugandan architecture and the importance of its conservation, I recently taught photography there with charity organisation CCFU which was such a rewarding and eyeopening experience.

Birds and their history of being photographed is a point of curiosity, particularly ever-pervasive seagulls. Also I’ve got a couple of exciting book projects in the works, it’s too soon to talk about other than to say it involves toys. §