Atop Habitat ’67 in Montréal, on the 10th floor, a private duplex has been renovated by Safdie Architects with the intent of donating to the public as a scholarly resource and architectural tourist attraction.

Considered one of the most important pieces of modern architecture, architect Moshe Safdie’s landmark housing scheme is a vision of utopian communal living in concrete and has inspired residential architecture and ideas about domestic living across the world.

Moshe Safdie Habitat 67 Duplex

The exterior of the duplex. Photography: Marc Cramer and Thomas Miau

With views across the Saint Lawrence River towards downtown Montréal, the duplex originally belonged to the Commissioner of the Expo 67. Efforts have been made over the two-year period of renovation to return the duplex to its original condition.

The process started with research – the architects made an inventory of the state of the building and examined archive material that revealed the original 1967 building and interiors.

Terrace of Habitat 67

The terrace at the Habitat ’67 duplex. Photography: Marc Cramer and Thomas Miau

Key structural renovations included repairing water damage and many technical elements were upgraded to meet sustainable standards of today. Wood parquet flooring now looks as good as new, with a slot detail added to allow air to flow from the raised floor below. Windows were replaced with energy-efficient equivalents, making sure to match the original profile and sightlines and the patio doors now retract smoothly into the wall.

Safdie Architects continues to work on the restoration of the exterior envelope of Habitat ’67 complex in order to preserve and celebrate the iconic design and its ambitious vision for living. §