Graduate Directory 2012

Influenced by a diverse range of architects, Andrew Heumann cites his grandparents' Eichler A-frame house in California as one of his initial architectural inspirations. His graduation project is on a subject he is passionate about, the parametric reinterpretation of a housing development in Hollywood based on the 1940 to 1960s American Case Study houses, and won him an AIA Henry Adams Certificate of Merit.
Would most like to work with: 'Snøhetta - it excels at producing challenging, innovative spaces.'

Andrew Heumann Cornell USA Architecture

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Eichler A-frame house in California

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Architecture Graduate Directory 2012

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parametric reinterpretation of a housing development

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Shanghai-based Chen Zhuowei completed his first degree at the China Academy of Art's School of Architecture before enrolling in a Masters course at the University of Hong Kong, a qualification he is currently working towards. His graduation design thesis explored the idea of vertical living. By breaking the monolithic nature of the standard highrise, Chen proposed a high standard of public-space design in a high-density urban context. 'Wang Shu's great consideration of vernacular culture, Rem Koolhaas's 'The Generic City', Álvaro Siza's design methodology… all their work has influenced me,' he says.
Would most like to work with: 'It would be a great honour to work in Siza's studio.'

Chen Zhuowei CAA China Architecture

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the idea of vertical living.

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Slotting in work stints with the likes of MVRDV in Rotterdam and Mole Architects in Cambridge in-between his studies, Chris Green combines theoretical and practical skills, and claims 'an unhealthy love of concrete and a penchant for drawing'. Data Forest, his graduation project (pictured), examines a future where an office tower on London's Silicon Roundabout becomes the site of an urban harvesting experiment spanning food and data.
Would most like to work with: 'Heatherwick, Rem Koolhaas and BERG if they started an office.'

Chris Green RCA UK Architecture

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'an unhealthy love of concrete and a penchant for drawing'.

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Graduate Directory 2012

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Data Forest- Chris Green

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Chris Green RCA UK Architecture Graduate Directory 2012

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The 'architecture' of nature (the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce Canyon National Park); traditional Japanese architecture; Alvar Aalto; Zaha Hadid; books by Rem Koolhaas; texts by Louis Kahn; 'Biophilia' by Edward O Wilson; 'The Death and Life of Great American Cities' by Jane Jacobs… they all inspired Russian Daliya Safiullina to architecture. Her first-class graduation thesis at the acclaimed Strelka Institute investigates reusing, recycling and upcycling elements of Soviet Panel houses and campaigns for waste prevention in Russia, issues she is hoping to develop alongside a career in architecture.
Would most like to work with: 'Kazuyo Sejima, Steven Holl, Atelier Bow-Wow, Wolf D Prix, BIG, Morphosis.'

Daliya Safiullina Strelka Architecture

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The 'architecture'

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Inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright's 'Fallingwater', Danny Wills sought out an architecture degree at Kent State University and followed with a full-tuition scholarship degree at New York's Cooper Union, where his final-year project explored four proposals for the future use of the Great Plains. Having bagged the Henry Adams AIA Medal and Certificate of Merit as well as the Toni and David Yarnell Prize in Architecture, Wills is now teaching at the Cooper Union. He also works with cultural consultants Museoplan on Hangzhou's Museum of Urbanism, designed by Herzog & de Meuron.
Would most like to work with: 'Smout Allen, Peter Zumthor, Herzog & de Meuron and Anders Abraham.'

Danny Wills Cooper Union USA Architecture

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four proposals for the future use of the Great Plains

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016 Danny Wills

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Danny Wills architecture

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David Späh comes from a family of architects and is 'fascinated by vernacular architecture, which often conveys immense personality without holding the label of a particular architect's name.' His thesis, bottom, speculates on how the city of Regensdorf can achieve densification and urban coherence while maintaining functionality and authenticity.
Would most like to work with: 'Álvaro Siza Vieira.'

David Spah ETHZ Switzerland Architecture

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A building

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020 David Spah ETHZ Switzerland Architecture Graduate Directory

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Emma Emerson followed her BA Hons in architecture from the University of Brighton with an award-winning MA in architecture, in 2012. Her thesis looks into boundaries in architecture and the idea of a Fence City. Having combined her studies with practical experience at offices such as Clive Sall Architecture and Walter Menteth, Emerson admits her main influences 'fall outside what the British establishment strictly deems "architecture". I'm fascinated by the space between the formal and informal city.' Emerson assisted in the co-ordination of RIBA's talks programme and the London Festival of Architecture in 2010.
Would most like to work with: 'Many different practices, big and small, here and abroad.'

A sketch of building construction

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Emma Emerson RCA UK Architecture

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Cardboard architectural model

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Jacobsen was drawn to architecture by her father's pencil drawings and 'a desire to create beautiful things'. Her final year project (pictured), looks at the transformation of a disused lighthouse in Bornholm and its surroundings. 'I am inspired by architects that achieve a robustness and simplicity while maintaining a connection to the surrounding.'
Would most like to work with: 'An architect who works between art and architecture.'

Ina Hjort Jacobsen KADK Danmark Architecture

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pencil drawing

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Jacobsen - final year project

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Pencil drawings of house

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Ina Hjort Jacobsen KADK Danmark Architecture Graduate Directory

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His thesis 'National Purist Routes', completed with fellow student Gislunn Halfdanardottir, studied the concept of national tourist routes and Iceland's energy issues and helped win Mathias Kempton the acclaimed Statsbygg Student Award for Outstanding Architecture. Kempton now works for Lateral Office in Toronto and is considering applying for a post-professional degree in the US. 'My initial drive towards architecture was based on my realisation that it combined simply "making stuff" with extending beyond myself as an individual. Architecture not only reflects cultural and social matters, it changes them by its very existence.'
Would most like to work with: 'I'm already working with Lateral Office, one of the few practices I really wanted to work for when graduating.'

Mathias Kempton OSAD Norway Architecture

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'National Purist Routes',- Mathias Kempton

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His background in construction and bricklaying introduced Morten Westrup Pedersen to the world of building design. A degree at the Royal Danish Academy's architecture school - where Westrup Pedersen found inspiration from Frank Lloyd Wright, Jørn Utzon and Louis Kahn - swiftly followed. His graduate project 'A Public Bath in Granada' follows his design of a public bath, including showers, Turkish hammam, laundry and kitchen, next to the old rammed-earth wall of the Spanish city. It's designed seamlessly in the same materials as its surroundings, and open to all.
Would most like to work with: 'Chris Thurlbourne, because he focuses on construction detailing.'

Morten Westrup Pedersen KADK Danmark Architecture

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construction and bricklaying -Morten Westrup Pedersen

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'A Public Bath in Granada' - Morten Westrup Pedersen

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It was reading Bernard Rudofsky's Architecture Without Architects at the formative age of 16 that inspired Ned Scott to become an architect. His thesis study focuses on the War Rooms at St James's Park in a hypothetical, futuristic scenario circa 2050 where the UK turns into a closed-loop agrarian economy. Scott's influences are varied, from John Hedjuk's Victims, to the etchings of Brodsky and Utkin.
Would most like to work with: 'Diller and Scofidio.'

Ned Scott Bartlett UK Architecture

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the War Rooms at St James's Park

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Ned Scott Bartlett UK Architecture Graduate Directory

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035 Ned Scott Bartlett UK Architecture Graduate Directory

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'My main interest is in graphic development - deriving complex spatial relations out of simple diagrams,' says Philipp Mecke, whose thesis involved designing a unique modular assembly method that would adapt to exterior and interior use. He cites Japanese architect Junya Ishigami as an inspiration: 'His work illustrates the emergence of complex structures via simple diagrams and the replication of these elements.' With a recommendation from Ben van Berkel of UNStudio, Mecke is heading off to work for the Performative Building Group at Bollinger + Grohmann, known for complex geometry and engineering solutions.
Would most like to work with 'I'd like to test my own ideas and connect with people who are open to test new things.'

Philipp Mecke Steadelschule Germany Architecture

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graphic development - deriving complex spatial relations out of simple diagrams,-Philipp Mecke

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Graduating from the Washington University in St Louis with a Master of Architecture and the Alpha Ro Chi Medal for student accomplishment, Samantha Stein also adds teaching assistant experience to her CV. Her family's engineering and graphic-design background helped Stein choose her profession, yet architecture is not her design stimulation; Richard Serra is one of her greatest sources of inspiration. 'His sculptures influenced how I think about weight, materiality and tectonics,' says Stein. For her graduate thesis on 'water as a spectacle', she designed an aquarium for the city of St Louis.
Would most like to work with: 'Snøhetta, where I'm now a full-time junior designer.'

Samantha Stein - Architecture Urban Design

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'water as a spectacle'-Samantha Stein

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After receiving his Part I from the Bartlett School of Architecture, Simon Moxey concentrated on developing the family business, Forum Homes, and becoming a partner at Moxey Associates in 2005. His recent masters from the RCA led to his Part II qualification, thanks to a thesis that imagines the city of Slough as Britain's next financial hub. Combining research skills with a practice-based approach has won Moxey several awards, including the RCA/New London Architecture Student Prize. As for his immediate future, it involves competitions and new commissions, 'Two residential projects on England's South Coast and a design-build project involving a house in London.'
Would most like to work with 'Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of Saana.'

Simon Moxey RCA UK Architecture

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Simon Moxey RCA UK Architecture Graduate Directory

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Architecture sketch of building

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Sina Momtaz completed his first degree at the College of Fine Arts, University of Tehran, before following up with a Masters from the prestigious École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. 'When I was a boy I was really interested in archaeology and learning about civilizations. I think old ruins inspired me to become an architect,' explains Momtaz, who admires the work of Aldo Rossi, Jean-Jacques Lequeu and Peter Zumthor. His graduation thesis on applying traditional consideration to rain, wind, shade and vegetation in contemporary architecture won him best in class. After internships at Dominique Perrault Architecture and François Roche, he plans to develop his practical skills by joining a woodworking studio.
Would most like to work with: 'Valerio Olgiati'

Sina Momtaz EPFL Switzerland Architecture

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047 Sina Momtaz EPFL Switzerland Architecture Graduate Directory

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Sina Momtaz architecture sketch

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Exterior and interior of building -a man sitting on top of building

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Vidhya Pushpanathan AA UK Architecture

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Completing her Part I at the Architectural Association in 2012, Vidhya Pushpanathan was awarded top honours and Bronze at the RIBA President's Medal, the annual prize for student and graduate work. Her graduation project, 'The Depository of Forgotten Monuments', looks at Moscow's ability to maintain local identity while accepting global influences. Pushpanathan places a 3D grid over the city to help create relationships between buildings, monitoring deconstruction and reconstruction.
Would most like to work with: 'The list is endless! I'm keen on firms where there's an opportunity to learn how the industry works and how a practice is run.'

Yukiko Kusumoto's design thesis proposed an urban environment made out of interweaving bridges. She decided to lift a neighbourhood's streets from ground level and introduce bridges to connect the various different buildings. 'I was always interested in house plans,' admits Kusumoto. She also admires the work of Japanese architect Yoshiji Takehara. 'His architecture just fits with the city, but still has a lot of originality.'
Would most like to work with: 'My tutor, Mr Masashi Sogabe.'

Yukiko Kusumoto Kanagawa Japan Architecture

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an urban environment made out of interweaving bridges

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Picture of a camera

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Ahmet Uslu's camera prototype adresses the problem of reconciling good looks and ergonomics with changing technology. 'Is it possible to design a camera considering all the other systems around it?' he asks. 'Digital evolution has changed the rules of product design. Products have become a part of a complex system, with smartphones, wireless connections and the sharing platforms all having a big impact on cameras and photography.

'VentrU' cast-iron radiator-Bertille Laguet ECAL Switzerland Design

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Bertille Laguet and Mathieu Rohrer work together as the duo Bertille & Mathieu. Their 'VentrU' cast-iron radiator has an interior space so that it can accommodate blankets, gloves and other accessories you may wish to warm or dry. 'Its generous volume and curves define its warm and comfy allure. It's an invitation to touch and to feel the sweet sensation of warmth.'

Bonaventure Touton Williams And Cleal Furniture UK Design

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Bonaventure Touton grew up in France, but found tutor and cabinetmaker Dominic Ash through the English side of his family. 'Contemporary retro design is my current passion. I love its visual simplicity. Using it in combination with colours that convey warmth and happiness, I seek to create a finished result that lifts the spirit.'

The 'Dim(Some)' chandelier

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The 'Dim(Some)' chandelier features two dimmer switches, one to turn more bulbs on or off and the other to adjust their brightness. 'I've been lucky enough to discover Arduino, the open-source electronics platform, which allows me to create work with endless possibilities in the area of lighting and electronics,' he says. 'Hacking known interactions with objects - something as simple as how a lamp can turn on or off - really fascinates me.'

Charlotte Baverel has devised a perpetual calendar manually adjusted through a set of rotating movements.

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Charlotte Baverel has devised a perpetual calendar manually adjusted through a set of rotating movements. Citing Constantin Brancusi and Alberto Giacommetti amongst her influences, the designer adds, ‘I try to link rationalism and poetry in my work. This calendar is a timeless sculpture.’

Giulio Parini's 'Brass Ensemble' lamp

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Giulio Parini's 'Brass Ensemble' lamp was inspired by the way the slide moves in a trombone and was made with the assistance of a trombone maker. 'In a trombone the variation in air pressure changes the musical note,' says Parini. 'In my lamp there is a low-tech pneumatic system. The variation in the volume of air inside the lamp's air chamber permits the slide between two tubes of different diameters, allowing a telescopic extension of the lamp body.'

Hugh Leader-Williams' 'Wood Grain Bowls'

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Hugh Leader-Williams' 'Wood Grain Bowls' are handmade copper bowls that were the result of experiments with the process of metal spinning, a traditional technique that straddles the boundaries of craft and industrial production. 'I substituted the steel formers that are normally used for ones made from oak and ash. Their distinctive grain pattern was imprinted into the inside surface of the copper bowls during production,' he says.

Imogen Clarkstone's cubist silver-plated milk jug

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Imogen Clarkstone's cubist silver-plated milk jug was an exploration of alternative construction techniques combined with traditional silversmithing. It was inspired by the artist Vladimir Arkhipov's collections of home-made, handmade objects. 'I am inspired by the inventive and the human, by people improvising with what they have, to create and mend in times of need,' she says.

elliptical concrete bowl

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Taking an architectural approach to design, Jo Woffinden explores space and form in her creations and works with a range of materials, from porcelain, bone china and stoneware to concrete, plaster and paper. This elliptical concrete bowl is part of her Baroque series. 'I wanted to bring the spirit of the baroque into a modern context,' she says. 'I focused on using curves to create a spatial flow between planes and lines.'

jewellery and cutlery

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Joo Hyung Park makes both cutlery and jewellery and it is while manipulating the materials that her designs are formed. 'The touch of my hands is significant in my work,' she says. 'I learn while I make objects and the ideas get developed together with my hands. With the two elements of my work, my desire is to share how I use my hands. They bring new life to a material as a piece of jewellery. I use them to start jewellery and complete cutlery.'

toaster

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Jungha Lee's hairdryer and toaster prototypes are designed to make these appliances more user-friendly. For the hairdryer, he asked: 'How to make a hairdryer easier to hang?' resulting in the umbrella-shaped handle. And for the toaster, the burning question was: 'How to make a toaster easier to cancel?' And so the keyboard-inspired 'enter' lever is counteracted with an 'esc' button on the top in case a quick eject becomes necessary.

Kim Thome RCA UK Design Graduate

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Primarily working with semi-translucent material, Kim Thome's shelf looks at the behaviour of reflection through the use of colour, shapes and a two-way mirror. 'Reflective and translucent materials offer visual scenarios that can be explored and choreographed by the viewer,' she says. 'The semi-transparent and reflective material is manipulated by naturally illuminated shapes in the fore and background of the object in such a way that the graphic aesthetic becomes something of a relational experience with the viewer.'

Laura Nelson's iron neatly addresses storage and convenience concerns. Eliminating the need for an ironing board, two aluminium plates apply heat and pressure to both sides of a garment thanks to a hinge mechanism, much like the ones in hair straighteners. It works particularly well for panels and tricky spots, such as collars and sleeves. And a heat-resistant sleeve means it can be stored away neatly even when it's still hot.

an ironing board- Laura Nelson

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Laura Nelson Kingston UK Design

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'Water Marble Stool'

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Lola Lely is a designer who lives and works in East London and studied under Tord Boontje. 'I have a long-standing fascination with colour, pattern and form. These elements are always present in my work and in 'Water Marble Stool', I marbled some turned, solid timber stools. Marble can transform lowly materials and objects into something beautiful and unique, elevating their perceived value.'

bottle sitting on table

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In her project Le Poids des Choses (The Weight of Things) Mathilde Pellé sought to explore the limits of usefulness in a piece of furniture. Thus her table extension, although  seemingly of service, may, in fact, destabilise the table depending on the weight of the item placed on it. 'My vision of design is about disturbing people's habits to create a small rift in their behaviour. I want to bring questioning and daydream-like qualities to everyday objects.'

'Barista' stove-top espresso maker

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For his 'Barista' stove-top espresso maker, Max Neu's aim wasn't to reinvent the coffee-making process, just the handling and appearance of the device used to make it. 'My aim is to try and increase the emotional value people have for the objects they use. I wanted to design an object that has the potential to become a beloved part of someone's morning ritual.' With its shapely design, it certainly inspires us to wake up and smell the coffee.

Naoki Otsuka's glass sphere vase

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The Japanese picture scroll, emakimono, provided the inspiration for Naoki Otsuka's glass sphere vase. 'The picture scroll is a form of traditional Japanese painting depicting many objects, architectre and artwork that have often disappeared in the modern world. I wanted to revive one of the tobjects from a scroll and so turned it into this flower vase,' she says.

Oliver Hrubiak Nottingham On Trent UK Design

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Oliver Hrubiak's 'Finn' lounge chair was inspired by midcentury Scandinavian functionalism and is an elegant combination of ash and powder-coated steel. It was awarded a New Designers Award by UK department store John Lewis in 2012 and is now being developed for retail there in the summer. 'I want to design products that mix functionality and aesthetics, and can adapt to changing trends and interior styles,' says Hrubiak.

Rory Thompson Manchester School Of Art UK Design

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Rory Thompson describes himself as a material and process-led designer. 'I love to test, question and find new possibilities and I want people to interact instinctively with my products like this modular shelving unit. I try to achieve this by stripping things back to their basic components. There is real elegance in this form of simplicity, but it is deceptive, as a huge amount of time actually goes into the design.'

'Vessel of the Senses' plate

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For her 'Vessel of the Senses' plate, Sandra Cohen Callman set herself the task of trying to heighten the emotional experience of food. 'I used the body, water and flow as my points of departure. A plate and a cup become a part of the body - a kind of extension of the hand - and demand physical contact in order to fulfill their function, thereby encouraging a more mobile manner of eating.'

wooden stepladderis

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Sina Sohrab’s wooden stepladderis an appealingly clean and elegant interpretation of the household staple. ‘I am interested in objects that become invisible as they satisfy their functions,’ says the Iranian-American designer. ‘With my work I am attempting to create products that are able to convey their utility directly, while fulfilling the needs of the user quietly.’

Debuting her S/S13 collection this year at New York Fashion Week, Aina Beck drew her inspiration from the pioneering work of 1960s American animator John Whitney and Jim Henson's eccentric early sketches. Her fascination with geometry and kaleidoscopic prints led to a collection that includes oversized printed knitwear, foiled colour-shifting patterns and sheer floor-length tulle dresses covered in asymmetrical shapes. She now has plans to launch her own brand.

Aina Beck Parson US Fashion

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Cosima Gadient IFDB Switzerland Fashion

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Cosima Gadient challenged the traditional catwalk format with a more intimate approach for her debut collection, seating the models among the audience on raised chairs. She paired flattering hourglass dresses with cinched bomber jackets and baseball-style hats, matching hyper-femininity with strong masculine sportswear. Using lace, sheer tulle and floor-length fringe to soften the look, Gadient's tight colour spectrum of white, dip-dye canary yellows, shimmering silver and dense blacks lets the technical draping, cuts and fluid silhouettes take centre stage.

Craig Green CSM UK Fashion

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Pushing menswear at a conceptual and physical level, Craig Green is already gaining industry recognition with approving nods from the likes of Walter Van Beirendonck and Henrik Vibskov. This September marked his inaugural S/S13 show at London Fashion Week, with a collection that matched a boyish imagination with New Age tribal mysticism. Green favours monochrome colours with a few digital prints to complement his precise, calculated tailoring.

Hiroaki Kanai RCA Fashion

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Osaka-born, London-based Hiroaki Kanai plays with volume, shape and one-colour outfits to challenge our perceptions of menswear. A year-long internship for Haider Ackermann during his studies clearly left its mark judging by his London Fashion Week S/S13 show. Its mixture of proportions, including cinched jackets, high-waisted cropped trousers and voluminous sleeves was futuristic menswear at its finest.

Jennifer Gadient IFDB Switzerland Fashion

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Swiss designer Jennifer Gadient creates voluminous pieces by blowing air into synthetic materials - transparent, colourless or brown PVC - and then moulding them into striking shapes. Her debut collection showcased translucent silhouettes in smoky hues over brown, gold and beige. In addition to synthetics, she used silk and velvet for a series of oversized sweaters, full body wraps and knee-length shell coats.

Jie Liang UAL UK Fashion

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London-based Jie Lang's graduate collection is inspired by paper craft and packaging shapes, and is rooted in interfacing surface textures. Using a limited palette of black and blue, Liang explores the creative possibilities of man-made fabrics in layered looks, including laser-cut, abstract patterns on some of her pieces. Her avant-garde shapes include cropped and pleated jackets, sheer knee-length shirts and head scarves, with an overall focus on durable and functional menswear.

Lucia Cuba Parsons US Fashion

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Peruvian Lucia Cuba's debut is both a fashion collection and social activist project, drawing attention to forced governmental sterilisation in Peru. Silhouettes are inspired by traditional Andean polleras (skirts), in maroon, yellow, cream and black, and she has embroidered fragments of victims' testimonies, political speeches, legal documents and research papers onto the fabrics, literally wrapping the wearer in information and creating fashion rooted in social awareness.

In naming her debut collection 'Bowerbird', Manon Kündig acknowledges the preliminary hunting and gathering that her designs require. Using online image resources, she created digital prints that resemble vibrant Rorschach tests. Blending seemingly random bits and pieces - a flower here, a cat there - Kundig's menswear label blurs the line between androgyny and other-worldly. Cropped tailored trousers, unstructured jackets and silk scarves adorned with faux fur, sequins, synthetics and lace create a mix of textures, colours and images that allure and intrigue.

Monon Kundig RCA Belgium Fashion

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Ryan Mercer RCA UK Fashion

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A bold sense of colour, clever use of fabrics, textures and complex detailing makes Canadian Ryan Mercer's womenswear collection a cut above the rest. Mercer has used a narrow selection of fabrics, maintaining a strong focus and clear direction. Panelled leather crop tops and pencil skirts in lambskin and snakeskin are held together by leather cord, while eyelets and lace add depth and structure to the perimeter of most of his garments. Demonstrating an assured sense of colour blocking, he used asymmetrical bands of neon yellow, deep orange and alabaster white strips, sometimes laser-etched, to striking effect.

Yulia Kondranina Central Saint Martins UK Fashion

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Yulia Kondranina has designed a highly technical collection, taking an architectural approach to the female form. She created radical shapes by wrapping fine viscose fringing around a flexible support structure. The internal mechanics and intricate design make for captivating pieces, while the black and white colour scheme allows the complex construction to shine.

Whether she is disintegrating gold or working with heat reactive metals, Alice McLean’s jewellery explores the expressive power of materials in transition. The London-based graduate subverts traditional notions of value with designs that vacillate in their physical form.

Alice Mc Lean RCA UK Jewellery

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085 Alice Mc Lean RCA UK Jewellery

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Caroline Kernick’s opulent creations may look like high jewellery pieces but they are in fact handcrafted from layers of paper, embellished with gouache. Showcased behind glass on a gallery wall, they are designed to perplex and intrigue the viewer and act as a commentary on notions of luxury. An exercise in endurance, each piece takes a staggering 200 to 300 hours to complete.

Caroline Kernick CSM UK Jewellery

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high jewellery pieces-Caroline Kernick

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opulent creations- Caroline Kernick

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Neck piece

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Necklace-Caroline Kernick

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Bold sculptural form is the foil for Kirstin Dunn’s seemingly delicate creations. The jeweller and silversmith might have an obvious instinct for light and tone, but it is the combination of materials and forms - such as 'the juxtaposition of lightweight plastics with metal structures' - that is central to her vision.

Kirstin Dunn-Jewellery

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Kirstin Dunn’s delicate creations.

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The urban environment - bridge frameworks, building sites and scaffolding - heavily informs Laura Templeton's designs, hence her tendency to view each piece as 'a miniature construction in precious metals'. Inspired by a 'juxtaposition of bold, straight and repetitive geometric shapes against the softness of the organic human form', her deft handling of form and function gives this Scottish newcomer's jewellery instant wearability.

Laura Templeton-Jewellery

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Laura Templeton Edinburgh College Of Art UK Jewellery

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A fascination with metals and their properties led jeweller Sophie Ellis to create pieces that are not necessarily as simple as: 'You wear it.' Hence her decision to make watches. Her pieces, which are cut in half to reveal inner mechanics, or are completely deconstructed leaving just an outline, highlight the compelling nature of horology. Hers is a modern attitude towards time: 'The irony of a watch being something you need but probably never understand amuses me.'

Sophie E Ellis CSM UK Jewellery

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blue strap white dial wrist watch

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Sophie E Ellis CSM UK Jewellery

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Collin Cummings created a package for the Savannah Bee Company's organic raw range inspired by the dichotomy between the aesthetic and the functional nature of honey. 'I have always loved how, despite involving such an old and somewhat industrial process, everything about honey is so beautiful,' he says. 'I aimed for a simple message and the chance for discovery'. His packaging incorporates glass bottles embellished with bee-inspired graphics, topped with wooden lids, and labeled with strong typography that offers the consumer information and serving suggestions.

Collin Cummings Packaging

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Savannah Bee Company's packing

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With a strong, colourful graphic element running through all of her graduate projects, Dafna Aizenberg's 'Hybris' is no exception. She has designed a cosmetics range inspired by forbidden treats and decided to use elements of confectionery packaging and branding for the collection. 'My purpose was to reflect the desire and natural, almost sexual, craving people have towards candy and apply it to cosmetics.'

DAFNA AIZENBERG SHENKAR UNIVERSITY ISRAEL Packaging

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Packaging

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cosmetics packaging

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Alphabet cosmetic packaging

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Heesang Lee Packaging

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Aiming to transform an X-Acto blades box from a simple container to a visual guide for the consumer, Heesang applied the aesthetic codes of the Fluxus movement to a practical, fuss-free design. 'I created a package design that provides information and focuses on practicality, with a neutral colour palette that allowed me to emphasise the hierarchy of the blades.' The stripped-down graphics give the monotone patterns a minimal look, with the blade number on the front, and an illustration of the blade's shape on the back.

Determined to combine eco-efficiency with simple yet striking aesthetics, Maria Milagros Bouroncle Rodriguez has redesigned the tea sachet. The minimalist black box opens to reveal an explosion of colourful sachets, each one a piece of paper folding art in itself, and able to be recycled. 'Drinking tea is an uncomplicated, delicate and tasteful experience of discovery, and I wanted the packaging to reflect this journey,' she says.

MILAGROS BOURONCLE RODRIGUEZ UQAM CANADA Packaging

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explosion of colourful sachets

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'Drinking tea'

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Maria Milagros Bouroncle Rodriguez -tea sachet

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A collaborative project between three students, the 'One Eighty' design began with a fascination for triangles. The sculptural packaging is made from a structure of tessellating triangles and changes shape as the product is used. As they say: 'Products should be simple to manufacture, yet with a striking and effective concept behind them. They should be both aesthetic and functional.' The three have now formed their own creative studio.

fascination for triangles

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NIKOLO MOTIFF JUHO KRUSKOPF ARTTU KUISMA INSTITUTE OF DESIGN FINLAND Packaging

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'Every project has a different problem for the designer to solve. I prefer the simple solutions,' says function-focused Otília Erdélyi. The elegant, one-piece egg box is made from natural microwaved cardboard and is not only practical, but also requires much less material than traditional cartons. 'My goal was to design an innovative package using a small amount of material. You just get the eggs out by taking off the sleeve and pulling back the top side.'

one-piece egg box

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Egg packaging

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an innovative package of eggs

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Inspiration for Keren's seafood packing came from varied sources: 'working in a Japanese fusion restaurant, the daily fishing at the port in Jaffa, seafood restaurants that are scattered throughout Tel Aviv, and of course, my love of seafood,' he says. Ron created a simple, practical and informative design. The Styrofoam package protects the raw content, keeping it fresh, and the red label is illustrated with details about the seafood, cooking equipment, as well as culinary and refrigeration advice. Each pack comes with tools, as well as detailed instructional cards that promise to turn shellfish skeptics into seafood chefs.

Rob Keren Packaging

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seafood packing

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Vibeke Ille Packaging

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When designing the packaging for premium Belgian beer brand Mercator, Illevold drew inspiration from the ship of the same name, built in 1936 in Ostende. Interested on the structural elements of the ship and how they transfer into beer packaging, she decided to focus on the rope that holds the whole ship together. 'When the rope became the main idea, everything else had to be really subtle,' she explains. 'I etched nautical objects on the bottles, stamped the lid with the same pattern, and changed the label into a "luggage tag", making the experience of drinking the beer a journey'.

A weak spot for pasta and Djarov's yearly travels to Italy were the building blocks for his La Forma Saporita packaging project, developed for his university thesis. 'Being there and enjoying all of it in person encouraged me to create a special brand that encapsulates my love for Italy. Djarov devised a monochrome design with vintage details that walk the line between nostalgic and modern. The project includes high-tech elements, with a smartphone app that enables you to find the nearest stockist, gives cooking tips and even helps you to measure the perfect portion.

Yanko Djarof Packaging

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La Forma Saporita packaging project

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Laptop screen

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André Giesemann's graduation project was called 'Attrappe: Reality and Cheating in Photography' and featured mock rooms that are in fact spaces in shops and museums. 'I wanted to create pictures that look like artificial veneers,' he says. 'I found rooms that looked like Potemkin villages. I wanted to review the reality of both the objects and the photography itself.'

mock rooms -André Giesemann's project

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Andre Giesemann University Of Applied Science Hamburg Photography Graduate Directory 2012

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A mock room with furniture and book shelf

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Antonia Basler is interested in photographing images and materials intended for mass production. 'This body of work focuses on objects found in dollar stores. Constructing scenes that examine the presence of the artificial in everyday life, I look to incorporate humour and references from art history in the composition and content of my work. The intent of the project is to create situations that obscure the function of a readily available product for the purpose of making an aesthetically appealing photograph.'

A heap of spoons and forks

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