New York’s elevated showcase of collectible vintage, modern and contemporary designs The Salon Art + Design returns to the Park Avenue Armory 8-12 November, with 55 art and design galleries from 11 different countries packed in. The fair’s signature mix of furniture, fine and decorative art couldn’t be better exemplified than some of its unique highlights, including a site-specific installation by the art for architecture design studio, Callidus Guild, made with the gallery Jeff Lincoln Art + Design. Here are some of this year’s other standout offerings that shouldn’t be missed...

Bernard Goldberg Fine Arts, New York

Peacock side chair from the 1920s

One of the fair’s most highly anticipated presentations is Bernard Goldberg’s collection of rare and unseen furniture designs from Frank Lloyd Wright. These include high-back chairs from 1908 for Browne’s Bookstore in Chicago, which closed in 1912, a series of rugs that Wright designed for the Arthur Heurtley house during his Prairie years, as well as the Peacock side chair from the 1920s that were created for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. To properly showcase the works, the New York gallerist has transformed his booth into a Wrightian house setting to serve as a fitting backdrop.

Southern Guild, South Africa

Andile Dyalvan Salon Art Design

As one of South Africa’s pioneering design galleries, Southern Guild brings the work of 21 South African artists to the Big Apple this year, many of which have never been presented on an international stage. The hand-thrown ceramics of Andile Dyalvane not only express the artist’s Xhosa heritage, but also reference specific aspects of rural life. His ‘Idlala’ (‘grain silo’ in Xhosa) series, which will be exhibited, highlights the central role of maize cultivation and its various impacts on village life.

Callidus Guild and Jeff Lincoln Art + Design, New York

Callidus Guild and Jeff Lincoln Art + Design, New York

The Brooklyn-based artist Yolande Batteau is a cherished favourite in design circles for her highly artistic approach to wall coverings and treatments. This year, Batteau takes over the Armory’s historic Library Room to create a unique installation comprised of a series of stelae, built from towering monoliths of plaster and canvas, as well as surfaces encrusted with metals, stone and marble dust plaster. In such a setting, Jeff Lincoln Art + Design has curated a selection of furniture and ceramics, including a Shiro Kuramata chair and a table by the glass artist John Pomp, to add to its dramatic effect.

Wexler Gallery, Philadelphia

wendell castle table set

Amongst the many gems that Philadelphia’s Wexler Gallery is presenting, the most memorable is a dining set by the late Wendell Castle. Purchased from a prominent Philadelphia collector who did not have room to accommodate it at their new residence in California, gallerist Lewis Wexler jumped to procure it. He says, ‘[The dining set] is beautifully crafted as only Wendell was capable of doing. It is a sculptural beauty but also a practical piece of furniture. The practicality of the piece, with a sunburst top that can be expanded by the number of triangular leaves added, is what really appeals to me.’

The Future Perfect, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco

Eric Roinstead works

The Future Perfect makes its fair debut with an avant-garde selection of contemporary design. The downtown gallery focuses its inaugural effort on new work from two of its contemporary ceramicists – the California-based artist Eric Roinestad, who infuses historical modern design and architecture with folkloric aspects of his Scandinavian heritage (pictured), and the Brooklyn-based Reinaldo Sanguino, who pairs his heavy statuesque forms with vibrant, painterly colours and motifs.

Dansk Mobelkunst, Copenhagen and Paris

Dansk Mobelkunst’s showing at Salon Art + Design

Named after the Danish word for Furniture Art, Dansk Mobelkunst specialises in rare Danish furniture made from 1920-70 – the period when a body of craftsmen, designers and architects erased the boundaries between functional objects and works of art. The gallery’s collection, which includes both handcrafted masterpieces and classic examples of industrial design, ranges from glazed stoneware vases from the 1930s by Axel Salto to a pair of leather chairs by Kaare Klint, also from the 1930s – thus showcasing an unexpected side of Danish design. §