Home baking: KUFstudio creates immaculate architecture-inspired cakes

Kia Utzon-Frank of KUFcakes
As featured in our September 2016 issue (W*210), Kia Utzon-Frank of KUFcakes reveals all behind her intricate architectural marble-cakes. Photography: Phil Dunlop
(Image credit: Phil Dunlop)

London-based Danish designer Kia Utzon-Frank originally trained in goldsmithing, but designs everything from jewellery to window blinds. Now, she's added cake-making to the mix.

At first glance, it’s hard to believe that her unique sculptural creations are, in fact, edible. Each cake is meticulously composed of thin layers of sponge and fruit ganache, finished with a blanket of marzipan, produced using a top-tier icing printer. Utzon-Frank insists her latest cake creations are a natural extension of her existing body of work. ‘Cake is just another material,’ she says. ‘I’m interested in transitions, transformation and triggering curiosity.’

To produce the cakes shown here, she took inspiration from our Carmody Groarke-designed shoot location, photographing the various surfaces and reproducing them on the deliciously minimal tiered columns. See the process in pictures, above, or watch the video here.

As originally featured in the September 2016 issue of Wallpaper* (W*210)

various surfaces

To produce the cakes, Utzon-Frank took inspiration from our Carmody Groarke-designed shoot location, photographing the various surfaces (pictured) before reproducing them on the deliciously minimal tiered columns. Photography: Kia Utzon-Frank

(Image credit: Photography: Kia Utzon-Frank)

hazelnut mousse and dark chocolate mousse

The mixture is built up around a triangular core of hazelnut mousse and dark chocolate mousse. Each indiviudal triangle has a different combination of flavours; for instance, spiced plum and roasted almond mousse, or dark and white chocolate. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

covered in a delicate 2mm roll layer

Once baked, the cake is covered in a delicate 2mm roll layer, onto which different ganaches and compotes are applied. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

black marble, granite, grass, concrete, or the brick walls

Each layer of marzipan is intended to signify one of the materials found in the house – black marble, granite, grass, concrete, or the brick walls, for example. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

spreads are applied painstakingly

The spreads are applied painstakingly, so no two pieces of the cake look or taste the same when cut. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

ruler and spirit level

Precision is achieved with a good old fashioned ruler and spirit level. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

sides of the cakes are trimmed and measured

Before covering the cakes with marzipan the sides of the cakes are trimmed and measured so all the triangles are exactly the right size and height. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

seconds to apply the spreads and roll the cake

She continues, 'The roll cake is prepared one sheet at a time as I only have seconds to apply the spreads and roll the cake after it has been taken out of the oven, otherwise it hardens and can’t be rolled'. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

covered in the different ganaches

The cakes are covered in the different ganaches. All edges are made as sharp as possible, mimicking the materials and exacting corners of the house. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

food colouring on a special marzipan printer

The marzipan is printed with food colouring on a special marzipan printer. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

Moment of completion

The presicion continues right until the moment of completion. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

inside is as important as the cake

'The inside of the cake is as important as the look of the cake. I don’t want the experience to stop when the cake is cut,' Utzon-Frank explains. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

A sculptural cake

The result? A sculptural cake that's literally too good to eat. 'This one was just made for photographic purposes,' Urzon-Frank explains. 'For private commissions I work from a certified kitchen.' Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

the age circles in an old tree

Sliced thinly, the gradiated layers evoke the internal lamination of marble, or the age circles in an old tree, capturing the spirit of the materials perfectly. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

tiered columns

The tiered columns reflect Urzon-Frank's former work as a goldsmith. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

a spectacular stripy slice

'The thin layers of roll cake is creating a spectacular stripy slice. By making the tastes gradient it triggers the people eating the cake’s curiosity and people start sharing their slices.' Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

A slice of cake

With a designer's eye, Urzon-Frank sums up how form meets function, even in baking. 'I want the cakes to be conversation starters both because of the taste, the look and the surprise.' Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

finished cake sculptures

The finished cake sculptures in their mouth-watering glory. Photography: Dunja Opalko

(Image credit: Photography: Dunja Opalko)

INFORMATION

For more information and bespoke commissions, visit the KUFstudios website (opens in new tab)