Las Vegas is a shrinking violet, said no one, ever. Everything from its sidewalks and themed hotels to its de trop glitzy malls and gigantic dinner buffets is an exercise in extreme attention seeking.

The 2,500-room Linq Hotel clocks in 2.65million sqft, a sprawling pleasure dome aimed squarely at the Millennial market which the hotel defines as those who aren’t in town to gamble – though there is a casino on the premises – but to 'dine, socialise and party'.

Boston-based Elkus Manfredi Architects were tapped to overhaul the old Caesar’s property, the Imperial Palace, into a bright, graphic, almost hands-off affair that is so charmingly 'anti-Vegas' in its vibe.

And so, on the ground floor, the traditional concierge has been replaced by self-help kiosks. Elevator banks are colour-coded to help navigate room quadrants. These are tastefully balanced by soothing grey stone in the spa, textured ribbed timber walls, and cosy nooks lined with plush wall fabrics. The bar is sheathed with a backlit resin on which a shifting digital pattern is emblazoned. The spacious rooms are swathed in pop art colours and feature eclectic digital wall murals inspired by vintage Vegas. The deluxe suites lead directly onto the pool, effectively turning the rooms into private poolside cabanas. Otherwise, a room with a view of a 550ft tall observation wheel called, appropriately, the High Roller offers a rather hypnotic experience.