Rag & Bone

Rag & Bone's signature cool received a 1990s remix this season. Minimalism reigned supreme, with models donning slip dresses, tailored overalls and box-pleat skirts in an equally restrained palette of blush, nude and white. All the mainstays of nineties pop culture got a look in. From thin-strapped halter-neck crop tops to overlaid knee-length chiffon skirts, the collection had a Calvin Klein feel to it. Designers David Neville and Marcus Wainwright elegantly infused the sportier pieces with hits of glamour, like languid track pants in shimmering, gauzy Lurex and buttoned-up polo Ts in black or turquoise chiffon. The pair's trademark details rippled quietly through: crinkled fabrics, shirttail hems and chunky lace-up wedges - finished off with semi-dried hair and a bright Geisha lip. The covetable insouciance was impossible to resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Rag & Bone's signature cool received a 1990s remix this season. Minimalism reigned supreme, with models donning slip dresses, tailored overalls and box-pleat skirts in an equally restrained palette of blush, nude and white. All the mainstays of nineties pop culture got a look in. From thin-strapped halter-neck crop tops to overlaid knee-length chiffon skirts, the collection had a Calvin Klein feel to it. Designers David Neville and Marcus Wainwright elegantly infused the sportier pieces with hits of glamour, like languid track pants in shimmering, gauzy Lurex and buttoned-up polo Ts in black or turquoise chiffon. The pair's trademark details rippled quietly through: crinkled fabrics, shirttail hems and chunky lace-up wedges - finished off with semi-dried hair and a bright Geisha lip. The covetable insouciance was impossible to resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Rag & Bone's signature cool received a 1990s remix this season. Minimalism reigned supreme, with models donning slip dresses, tailored overalls and box-pleat skirts in an equally restrained palette of blush, nude and white. All the mainstays of nineties pop culture got a look in. From thin-strapped halter-neck crop tops to overlaid knee-length chiffon skirts, the collection had a Calvin Klein feel to it. Designers David Neville and Marcus Wainwright elegantly infused the sportier pieces with hits of glamour, like languid track pants in shimmering, gauzy Lurex and buttoned-up polo Ts in black or turquoise chiffon. The pair's trademark details rippled quietly through: crinkled fabrics, shirttail hems and chunky lace-up wedges - finished off with semi-dried hair and a bright Geisha lip. The covetable insouciance was impossible to resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Rag & Bone's signature cool received a 1990s remix this season. Minimalism reigned supreme, with models donning slip dresses, tailored overalls and box-pleat skirts in an equally restrained palette of blush, nude and white. All the mainstays of nineties pop culture got a look in. From thin-strapped halter-neck crop tops to overlaid knee-length chiffon skirts, the collection had a Calvin Klein feel to it. Designers David Neville and Marcus Wainwright elegantly infused the sportier pieces with hits of glamour, like languid track pants in shimmering, gauzy Lurex and buttoned-up polo Ts in black or turquoise chiffon. The pair's trademark details rippled quietly through: crinkled fabrics, shirttail hems and chunky lace-up wedges - finished off with semi-dried hair and a bright Geisha lip. The covetable insouciance was impossible to resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Rag & Bone

Rag & Bone's signature cool received a 1990s remix this season. Minimalism reigned supreme, with models donning slip dresses, tailored overalls and box-pleat skirts in an equally restrained palette of blush, nude and white. All the mainstays of nineties pop culture got a look in. From thin-strapped halter-neck crop tops to overlaid knee-length chiffon skirts, the collection had a Calvin Klein feel to it. Designers David Neville and Marcus Wainwright elegantly infused the sportier pieces with hits of glamour, like languid track pants in shimmering, gauzy Lurex and buttoned-up polo Ts in black or turquoise chiffon. The pair's trademark details rippled quietly through: crinkled fabrics, shirttail hems and chunky lace-up wedges - finished off with semi-dried hair and a bright Geisha lip. The covetable insouciance was impossible to resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

Lacoste continued its upward trajectory with sophisticated collections for men and women that will quiet any skeptics dismissing its avant-garde ambitions. While embracing clean, minimal silhouettes and sumptuous fabrics, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista remained true to the French house's tennis heritage, paying homage to that ever-present motif on the court: the white lines. Baptista's interpretation adorned suit jackets and long, trailing coats trimmed with contrast-coloured piping. Even Lacoste's signature polo T was contoured with short, painterly lines. As models emerged from behind a white caged set, the experimentation with line and contrast veered towards the irregular, to alluring effect. Most memorable was the designer's use of sheer, gauzy fabrics in suits and dresses - with subtle opaque panels to protect one's modesty, of course.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

Lacoste continued its upward trajectory with sophisticated collections for men and women that will quiet any skeptics dismissing its avant-garde ambitions. While embracing clean, minimal silhouettes and sumptuous fabrics, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista remained true to the French house's tennis heritage, paying homage to that ever-present motif on the court: the white lines. Baptista's interpretation adorned suit jackets and long, trailing coats trimmed with contrast-coloured piping. Even Lacoste's signature polo T was contoured with short, painterly lines. As models emerged from behind a white caged set, the experimentation with line and contrast veered towards the irregular, to alluring effect. Most memorable was the designer's use of sheer, gauzy fabrics in suits and dresses - with subtle opaque panels to protect one's modesty, of course.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

Lacoste continued its upward trajectory with sophisticated collections for men and women that will quiet any skeptics dismissing its avant-garde ambitions. While embracing clean, minimal silhouettes and sumptuous fabrics, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista remained true to the French house's tennis heritage, paying homage to that ever-present motif on the court: the white lines. Baptista's interpretation adorned suit jackets and long, trailing coats trimmed with contrast-coloured piping. Even Lacoste's signature polo T was contoured with short, painterly lines. As models emerged from behind a white caged set, the experimentation with line and contrast veered towards the irregular, to alluring effect. Most memorable was the designer's use of sheer, gauzy fabrics in suits and dresses - with subtle opaque panels to protect one's modesty, of course.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

Lacoste continued its upward trajectory with sophisticated collections for men and women that will quiet any skeptics dismissing its avant-garde ambitions. While embracing clean, minimal silhouettes and sumptuous fabrics, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista remained true to the French house's tennis heritage, paying homage to that ever-present motif on the court: the white lines. Baptista's interpretation adorned suit jackets and long, trailing coats trimmed with contrast-coloured piping. Even Lacoste's signature polo T was contoured with short, painterly lines. As models emerged from behind a white caged set, the experimentation with line and contrast veered towards the irregular, to alluring effect. Most memorable was the designer's use of sheer, gauzy fabrics in suits and dresses - with subtle opaque panels to protect one's modesty, of course.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Lacoste

Lacoste continued its upward trajectory with sophisticated collections for men and women that will quiet any skeptics dismissing its avant-garde ambitions. While embracing clean, minimal silhouettes and sumptuous fabrics, creative director Felipe Oliveira Baptista remained true to the French house's tennis heritage, paying homage to that ever-present motif on the court: the white lines. Baptista's interpretation adorned suit jackets and long, trailing coats trimmed with contrast-coloured piping. Even Lacoste's signature polo T was contoured with short, painterly lines. As models emerged from behind a white caged set, the experimentation with line and contrast veered towards the irregular, to alluring effect. Most memorable was the designer's use of sheer, gauzy fabrics in suits and dresses - with subtle opaque panels to protect one's modesty, of course.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Prabal Gurung

Bert Stern's iconic image of a less-than-perfect Marilyn Monroe was front and centre on Prabal Gurung's Spring mood board. Although the classic 1950s photo informed sweetheart necklines and corset constructions on glamour-puss gowns and silk-satin opera coats, it did nothing to predict the fantastic pops of colour that shot across this accomplished collection like firecrackers. Lips flashed in fire-cone orange and eyes were edged in turquoise waves and white specs while feet were encased in blood-red ladylike stilettos. But the show wasn't all just great styling. This season Gurung worked precisely cut, newly engineered silhouettes that saw harnesses built into the backs of poplin sheath dresses, open backs cut into cropped, broad-shouldered jackets and skirts cut into svelte columns that dropped well below the models’ knees. The collection struck a delicate balance between feminine elegance and a modern girl’s need for diversion and distinction.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prabal Gurung

Bert Stern's iconic image of a less-than-perfect Marilyn Monroe was front and centre on Prabal Gurung's Spring mood board. Although the classic 1950s photo informed sweetheart necklines and corset constructions on glamour-puss gowns and silk-satin opera coats, it did nothing to predict the fantastic pops of colour that shot across this accomplished collection like firecrackers. Lips flashed in fire-cone orange and eyes were edged in turquoise waves and white specs while feet were encased in blood-red ladylike stilettos. But the show wasn't all just great styling. This season Gurung worked precisely cut, newly engineered silhouettes that saw harnesses built into the backs of poplin sheath dresses, open backs cut into cropped, broad-shouldered jackets and skirts cut into svelte columns that dropped well below the models’ knees. The collection struck a delicate balance between feminine elegance and a modern girl’s need for diversion and distinction.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prabal Gurung

Bert Stern's iconic image of a less-than-perfect Marilyn Monroe was front and centre on Prabal Gurung's Spring mood board. Although the classic 1950s photo informed sweetheart necklines and corset constructions on glamour-puss gowns and silk-satin opera coats, it did nothing to predict the fantastic pops of colour that shot across this accomplished collection like firecrackers. Lips flashed in fire-cone orange and eyes were edged in turquoise waves and white specs while feet were encased in blood-red ladylike stilettos. But the show wasn't all just great styling. This season Gurung worked precisely cut, newly engineered silhouettes that saw harnesses built into the backs of poplin sheath dresses, open backs cut into cropped, broad-shouldered jackets and skirts cut into svelte columns that dropped well below the models’ knees. The collection struck a delicate balance between feminine elegance and a modern girl’s need for diversion and distinction.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prabal Gurung

Bert Stern's iconic image of a less-than-perfect Marilyn Monroe was front and centre on Prabal Gurung's Spring mood board. Although the classic 1950s photo informed sweetheart necklines and corset constructions on glamour-puss gowns and silk-satin opera coats, it did nothing to predict the fantastic pops of colour that shot across this accomplished collection like firecrackers. Lips flashed in fire-cone orange and eyes were edged in turquoise waves and white specs while feet were encased in blood-red ladylike stilettos. But the show wasn't all just great styling. This season Gurung worked precisely cut, newly engineered silhouettes that saw harnesses built into the backs of poplin sheath dresses, open backs cut into cropped, broad-shouldered jackets and skirts cut into svelte columns that dropped well below the models’ knees. The collection struck a delicate balance between feminine elegance and a modern girl’s need for diversion and distinction.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prabal Gurung

Bert Stern's iconic image of a less-than-perfect Marilyn Monroe was front and centre on Prabal Gurung's Spring mood board. Although the classic 1950s photo informed sweetheart necklines and corset constructions on glamour-puss gowns and silk-satin opera coats, it did nothing to predict the fantastic pops of colour that shot across this accomplished collection like firecrackers. Lips flashed in fire-cone orange and eyes were edged in turquoise waves and white specs while feet were encased in blood-red ladylike stilettos. But the show wasn't all just great styling. This season Gurung worked precisely cut, newly engineered silhouettes that saw harnesses built into the backs of poplin sheath dresses, open backs cut into cropped, broad-shouldered jackets and skirts cut into svelte columns that dropped well below the models’ knees. The collection struck a delicate balance between feminine elegance and a modern girl’s need for diversion and distinction.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander Wang

At first glance, the geometric stencilled motifs laser-cut into the paper-thin leathers at Alexander Wang seemed like random decoration. But upon closer inspection - of waistbands and caged coats and between the pleats of cheerleader skirts - it became clear the cut-outs were letters spelling out the designer's name like ticker tape. The timing of this branding exercise could not have been better. Wang is, after all, the newly instated designer at Balenciaga, one of Paris's most glittering, historic maisons. And yet he still has his own New York-based label to tend to. One felt, watching this show, that Wang had a greater interest in separating the two and did so by driving an even sportier, less serious stake into his eponymous label. These were no-brainer clothes for girls who just wanna have fun. Skirts, cut from crisp cotton, had micro-mini lengths; men's silk boxers were paired with coordinating shirts, buttoned at the neck only; and baby-doll dresses, barely grazing the tops of thighs, were cut from somber swathes of grey suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander Wang

At first glance, the geometric stencilled motifs laser-cut into the paper-thin leathers at Alexander Wang seemed like random decoration. But upon closer inspection - of waistbands and caged coats and between the pleats of cheerleader skirts - it became clear the cut-outs were letters spelling out the designer's name like ticker tape. The timing of this branding exercise could not have been better. Wang is, after all, the newly instated designer at Balenciaga, one of Paris's most glittering, historic maisons. And yet he still has his own New York-based label to tend to. One felt, watching this show, that Wang had a greater interest in separating the two and did so by driving an even sportier, less serious stake into his eponymous label. These were no-brainer clothes for girls who just wanna have fun. Skirts, cut from crisp cotton, had micro-mini lengths; men's silk boxers were paired with coordinating shirts, buttoned at the neck only; and baby-doll dresses, barely grazing the tops of thighs, were cut from somber swathes of grey suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander Wang

At first glance, the geometric stencilled motifs laser-cut into the paper-thin leathers at Alexander Wang seemed like random decoration. But upon closer inspection - of waistbands and caged coats and between the pleats of cheerleader skirts - it became clear the cut-outs were letters spelling out the designer's name like ticker tape. The timing of this branding exercise could not have been better. Wang is, after all, the newly instated designer at Balenciaga, one of Paris's most glittering, historic maisons. And yet he still has his own New York-based label to tend to. One felt, watching this show, that Wang had a greater interest in separating the two and did so by driving an even sportier, less serious stake into his eponymous label. These were no-brainer clothes for girls who just wanna have fun. Skirts, cut from crisp cotton, had micro-mini lengths; men's silk boxers were paired with coordinating shirts, buttoned at the neck only; and baby-doll dresses, barely grazing the tops of thighs, were cut from somber swathes of grey suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander Wang

At first glance, the geometric stencilled motifs laser-cut into the paper-thin leathers at Alexander Wang seemed like random decoration. But upon closer inspection - of waistbands and caged coats and between the pleats of cheerleader skirts - it became clear the cut-outs were letters spelling out the designer's name like ticker tape. The timing of this branding exercise could not have been better. Wang is, after all, the newly instated designer at Balenciaga, one of Paris's most glittering, historic maisons. And yet he still has his own New York-based label to tend to. One felt, watching this show, that Wang had a greater interest in separating the two and did so by driving an even sportier, less serious stake into his eponymous label. These were no-brainer clothes for girls who just wanna have fun. Skirts, cut from crisp cotton, had micro-mini lengths; men's silk boxers were paired with coordinating shirts, buttoned at the neck only; and baby-doll dresses, barely grazing the tops of thighs, were cut from somber swathes of grey suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander Wang

At first glance, the geometric stencilled motifs laser-cut into the paper-thin leathers at Alexander Wang seemed like random decoration. But upon closer inspection - of waistbands and caged coats and between the pleats of cheerleader skirts - it became clear the cut-outs were letters spelling out the designer's name like ticker tape. The timing of this branding exercise could not have been better. Wang is, after all, the newly instated designer at Balenciaga, one of Paris's most glittering, historic maisons. And yet he still has his own New York-based label to tend to. One felt, watching this show, that Wang had a greater interest in separating the two and did so by driving an even sportier, less serious stake into his eponymous label. These were no-brainer clothes for girls who just wanna have fun. Skirts, cut from crisp cotton, had micro-mini lengths; men's silk boxers were paired with coordinating shirts, buttoned at the neck only; and baby-doll dresses, barely grazing the tops of thighs, were cut from somber swathes of grey suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Altuzarra

Joseph Altuzarra, New York's hottest young talent, holds the key to the city's most sophisticated runway. An open neck, a saucy skirt slit and a wave of fringe are all a woman will need to make a hell of a statement next season. For Spring the designer looked to Japanese Boro clothing - folky farming or fishing garments - to inform his pure, pared-down silhouettes. Yet he used the drama of leather fringe and corsetry to package it into something more haute. The man's everyday Oxford shirt provided a canvas from which all other designs sprouted - and proved an effective layering device. Long column skirts had shirt-button edging and rounded hems, some with obi-style fold-over waists. Ponchos had graphic black and white striped trim, and the sleep shirt became a sexy striped-silk upper-half proposition. The collection was quiet in its palette of white, with hits of soft men's blue or baby pink. But it roared its new call for grace, elegance and glamour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Altuzarra

Joseph Altuzarra, New York's hottest young talent, holds the key to the city's most sophisticated runway. An open neck, a saucy skirt slit and a wave of fringe are all a woman will need to make a hell of a statement next season. For Spring the designer looked to Japanese Boro clothing - folky farming or fishing garments - to inform his pure, pared-down silhouettes. Yet he used the drama of leather fringe and corsetry to package it into something more haute. The man's everyday Oxford shirt provided a canvas from which all other designs sprouted - and proved an effective layering device. Long column skirts had shirt-button edging and rounded hems, some with obi-style fold-over waists. Ponchos had graphic black and white striped trim, and the sleep shirt became a sexy striped-silk upper-half proposition. The collection was quiet in its palette of white, with hits of soft men's blue or baby pink. But it roared its new call for grace, elegance and glamour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Altuzarra

Joseph Altuzarra, New York's hottest young talent, holds the key to the city's most sophisticated runway. An open neck, a saucy skirt slit and a wave of fringe are all a woman will need to make a hell of a statement next season. For Spring the designer looked to Japanese Boro clothing - folky farming or fishing garments - to inform his pure, pared-down silhouettes. Yet he used the drama of leather fringe and corsetry to package it into something more haute. The man's everyday Oxford shirt provided a canvas from which all other designs sprouted - and proved an effective layering device. Long column skirts had shirt-button edging and rounded hems, some with obi-style fold-over waists. Ponchos had graphic black and white striped trim, and the sleep shirt became a sexy striped-silk upper-half proposition. The collection was quiet in its palette of white, with hits of soft men's blue or baby pink. But it roared its new call for grace, elegance and glamour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Altuzarra

Joseph Altuzarra, New York's hottest young talent, holds the key to the city's most sophisticated runway. An open neck, a saucy skirt slit and a wave of fringe are all a woman will need to make a hell of a statement next season. For Spring the designer looked to Japanese Boro clothing - folky farming or fishing garments - to inform his pure, pared-down silhouettes. Yet he used the drama of leather fringe and corsetry to package it into something more haute. The man's everyday Oxford shirt provided a canvas from which all other designs sprouted - and proved an effective layering device. Long column skirts had shirt-button edging and rounded hems, some with obi-style fold-over waists. Ponchos had graphic black and white striped trim, and the sleep shirt became a sexy striped-silk upper-half proposition. The collection was quiet in its palette of white, with hits of soft men's blue or baby pink. But it roared its new call for grace, elegance and glamour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Altuzarra

Joseph Altuzarra, New York's hottest young talent, holds the key to the city's most sophisticated runway. An open neck, a saucy skirt slit and a wave of fringe are all a woman will need to make a hell of a statement next season. For Spring the designer looked to Japanese Boro clothing - folky farming or fishing garments - to inform his pure, pared-down silhouettes. Yet he used the drama of leather fringe and corsetry to package it into something more haute. The man's everyday Oxford shirt provided a canvas from which all other designs sprouted - and proved an effective layering device. Long column skirts had shirt-button edging and rounded hems, some with obi-style fold-over waists. Ponchos had graphic black and white striped trim, and the sleep shirt became a sexy striped-silk upper-half proposition. The collection was quiet in its palette of white, with hits of soft men's blue or baby pink. But it roared its new call for grace, elegance and glamour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Victoria Beckham

Sober dressing just got a serious new player for next Spring. Victoria Beckham's former gig as a pop star may still strike some as an unlikely breeding ground for her label's rigorous elegance, but Beckham has officially carved out a fashion niche we're dubbing sober spice. Borrowing just the right bits from the boys, Beckham's Spring world is refined but young, polished but cool, yet wrapped up in womanly allure. What makes the collection work are her easy, approachable silhouettes, from short skirts and long Bermuda shorts to men's boxy shirting and cool sportif dresses - all ever so slightly tweaked into something fresh and new. Crisp shirting was covered in mosaic patterns; short skirts were rimmed with bouncy, flippy hems; and short-sleeved body-skimming dresses layered with body suits had asymmetrical hems out from which peeked curtains of pleating.

Photography: Jason-Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Victoria Beckham

Sober dressing just got a serious new player for next Spring. Victoria Beckham's former gig as a pop star may still strike some as an unlikely breeding ground for her label's rigorous elegance, but Beckham has officially carved out a fashion niche we're dubbing 'sober spice'. Borrowing just the right bits from the boys, Beckham's Spring world is refined but young, polished but cool, yet wrapped up in womanly allure. What makes the collection work are her easy, approachable silhouettes, from short skirts and long Bermuda shorts to men's boxy shirting and cool sportif dresses - all ever so slightly tweaked into something fresh and new. Crisp shirting was covered in mosaic patterns; short skirts were rimmed with bouncy, flippy hems; and short-sleeved body-skimming dresses layered with body suits had asymmetrical hems out from which peeked curtains of pleating.

Photography: Jason-Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Victoria Beckham

Sober dressing just got a serious new player for next Spring. Victoria Beckham's former gig as a pop star may still strike some as an unlikely breeding ground for her label's rigorous elegance, but Beckham has officially carved out a fashion niche we're dubbing 'sober spice'. Borrowing just the right bits from the boys, Beckham's Spring world is refined but young, polished but cool, yet wrapped up in womanly allure. What makes the collection work are her easy, approachable silhouettes, from short skirts and long Bermuda shorts to men's boxy shirting and cool sportif dresses - all ever so slightly tweaked into something fresh and new. Crisp shirting was covered in mosaic patterns; short skirts were rimmed with bouncy, flippy hems; and short-sleeved body-skimming dresses layered with body suits had asymmetrical hems out from which peeked curtains of pleating.

Photography: Jason-Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Victoria Beckham

Sober dressing just got a serious new player for next Spring. Victoria Beckham's former gig as a pop star may still strike some as an unlikely breeding ground for her label's rigorous elegance, but Beckham has officially carved out a fashion niche we're dubbing 'sober spice'. Borrowing just the right bits from the boys, Beckham's Spring world is refined but young, polished but cool, yet wrapped up in womanly allure. What makes the collection work are her easy, approachable silhouettes, from short skirts and long Bermuda shorts to men's boxy shirting and cool sportif dresses - all ever so slightly tweaked into something fresh and new. Crisp shirting was covered in mosaic patterns; short skirts were rimmed with bouncy, flippy hems; and short-sleeved body-skimming dresses layered with body suits had asymmetrical hems out from which peeked curtains of pleating.

Photography: Jason-Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Victoria Beckham

Sober dressing just got a serious new player for next Spring. Victoria Beckham's former gig as a pop star may still strike some as an unlikely breeding ground for her label's rigorous elegance, but Beckham has officially carved out a fashion niche we're dubbing 'sober spice'. Borrowing just the right bits from the boys, Beckham's Spring world is refined but young, polished but cool, yet wrapped up in womanly allure. What makes the collection work are her easy, approachable silhouettes, from short skirts and long Bermuda shorts to men's boxy shirting and cool sportif dresses - all ever so slightly tweaked into something fresh and new. Crisp shirting was covered in mosaic patterns; short skirts were rimmed with bouncy, flippy hems; and short-sleeved body-skimming dresses layered with body suits had asymmetrical hems out from which peeked curtains of pleating.

Photography: Jason-Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul made a beeline for the boudoir this season, with a sexy take on wardrobe basics. The Thai-American designer, who is known for his lovely print work, eschewed pattern almost entirely this season except for an arresting crimson rose floral that sashayed down the runway on an asymmetrical dress with a knife pleat skirt. The most successful looks were those that blended pared-down silhouettes – like his voluminous cream pants – with simple crop tops detailed with a vertical band of brilliant crystals or a seductive panel of lace. Long strings of pearls also appeared on the runway, draped as classic necklaces but also materialising as straps to silky camisoles and slips. Meanwhile, Panichgul’s racy skintight peeptoe boots with silver heels were, in a word, hot.

Writer: JJ Martin

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul made a beeline for the boudoir this season, with a sexy take on wardrobe basics. The Thai-American designer, who is known for his lovely print work, eschewed pattern almost entirely this season except for an arresting crimson rose floral that sashayed down the runway on an asymmetrical dress with a knife pleat skirt. The most successful looks were those that blended pared-down silhouettes – like his voluminous cream pants – with simple crop tops detailed with a vertical band of brilliant crystals or a seductive panel of lace. Long strings of pearls also appeared on the runway, draped as classic necklaces but also materialising as straps to silky camisoles and slips. Meanwhile, Panichgul’s racy skintight peeptoe boots with silver heels were, in a word, hot.

Writer: JJ Martin

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul made a beeline for the boudoir this season, with a sexy take on wardrobe basics. The Thai-American designer, who is known for his lovely print work, eschewed pattern almost entirely this season except for an arresting crimson rose floral that sashayed down the runway on an asymmetrical dress with a knife pleat skirt. The most successful looks were those that blended pared-down silhouettes – like his voluminous cream pants – with simple crop tops detailed with a vertical band of brilliant crystals or a seductive panel of lace. Long strings of pearls also appeared on the runway, draped as classic necklaces but also materialising as straps to silky camisoles and slips. Meanwhile, Panichgul’s racy skintight peeptoe boots with silver heels were, in a word, hot.

Writer: JJ Martin

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul made a beeline for the boudoir this season, with a sexy take on wardrobe basics. The Thai-American designer, who is known for his lovely print work, eschewed pattern almost entirely this season except for an arresting crimson rose floral that sashayed down the runway on an asymmetrical dress with a knife pleat skirt. The most successful looks were those that blended pared-down silhouettes – like his voluminous cream pants – with simple crop tops detailed with a vertical band of brilliant crystals or a seductive panel of lace. Long strings of pearls also appeared on the runway, draped as classic necklaces but also materialising as straps to silky camisoles and slips. Meanwhile, Panichgul’s racy skintight peeptoe boots with silver heels were, in a word, hot.

Writer: JJ Martin

Thakoon

Thakoon Panichgul made a beeline for the boudoir this season, with a sexy take on wardrobe basics. The Thai-American designer, who is known for his lovely print work, eschewed pattern almost entirely this season except for an arresting crimson rose floral that sashayed down the runway on an asymmetrical dress with a knife pleat skirt. The most successful looks were those that blended pared-down silhouettes – like his voluminous cream pants – with simple crop tops detailed with a vertical band of brilliant crystals or a seductive panel of lace. Long strings of pearls also appeared on the runway, draped as classic necklaces but also materialising as straps to silky camisoles and slips. Meanwhile, Panichgul’s racy skintight peeptoe boots with silver heels were, in a word, hot.

Writer: JJ Martin

Y-3

Y-3 may be 10 years old, but Adidas' collaborative effort with Yohji Yamamoto continued to draw people in droves. After lines formed down the block to get into Moynihan Station, a former post office, the venue was packed to the rafters with press, fans, even a Bieber. Once the house lights went down, Y-3's take on street fashion and youth culture came armed with a cyberpunk vibe. Titled Meaningless Excitement, the show featured acid-toned hoodies, T-shirts and trousers, orchestrated in a steady, psychedelic stream by Peter Saville. Black, however, is what Y-3 does best, and a graphic experiment with Adidas' signature stripes showed there are new tricks in this old dog yet. Accompanied by live percussion, the show couldn't have been more invigorating. Especially at the end, when Yohji himself took a turn on the drums.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

Y-3 may be 10 years old, but Adidas' collaborative effort with Yohji Yamamoto continued to draw people in droves. After lines formed down the block to get into Moynihan Station, a former post office, the venue was packed to the rafters with press, fans, even a Bieber. Once the house lights went down, Y-3's take on street fashion and youth culture came armed with a cyberpunk vibe. Titled Meaningless Excitement, the show featured acid-toned hoodies, T-shirts and trousers, orchestrated in a steady, psychedelic stream by Peter Saville. Black, however, is what Y-3 does best, and a graphic experiment with Adidas' signature stripes showed there are new tricks in this old dog yet. Accompanied by live percussion, the show couldn't have been more invigorating. Especially at the end, when Yohji himself took a turn on the drums.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

Y-3 may be 10 years old, but Adidas' collaborative effort with Yohji Yamamoto continued to draw people in droves. After lines formed down the block to get into Moynihan Station, a former post office, the venue was packed to the rafters with press, fans, even a Bieber. Once the house lights went down, Y-3's take on street fashion and youth culture came armed with a cyberpunk vibe. Titled Meaningless Excitement, the show featured acid-toned hoodies, T-shirts and trousers, orchestrated in a steady, psychedelic stream by Peter Saville. Black, however, is what Y-3 does best, and a graphic experiment with Adidas' signature stripes showed there are new tricks in this old dog yet. Accompanied by live percussion, the show couldn't have been more invigorating. Especially at the end, when Yohji himself took a turn on the drums.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

Y-3 may be 10 years old, but Adidas' collaborative effort with Yohji Yamamoto continued to draw people in droves. After lines formed down the block to get into Moynihan Station, a former post office, the venue was packed to the rafters with press, fans, even a Bieber. Once the house lights went down, Y-3's take on street fashion and youth culture came armed with a cyberpunk vibe. Titled Meaningless Excitement, the show featured acid-toned hoodies, T-shirts and trousers, orchestrated in a steady, psychedelic stream by Peter Saville. Black, however, is what Y-3 does best, and a graphic experiment with Adidas' signature stripes showed there are new tricks in this old dog yet. Accompanied by live percussion, the show couldn't have been more invigorating. Especially at the end, when Yohji himself took a turn on the drums.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Y-3

Y-3 may be 10 years old, but Adidas' collaborative effort with Yohji Yamamoto continued to draw people in droves. After lines formed down the block to get into Moynihan Station, a former post office, the venue was packed to the rafters with press, fans, even a Bieber. Once the house lights went down, Y-3's take on street fashion and youth culture came armed with a cyberpunk vibe. Titled Meaningless Excitement, the show featured acid-toned hoodies, T-shirts and trousers, orchestrated in a steady, psychedelic stream by Peter Saville. Black, however, is what Y-3 does best, and a graphic experiment with Adidas' signature stripes showed there are new tricks in this old dog yet. Accompanied by live percussion, the show couldn't have been more invigorating. Especially at the end, when Yohji himself took a turn on the drums.

Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

When it comes to ethical fashion, few brands can compare to Edun. The label took it up a notch this season, with its new creative director Danielle Sherman turning out a confident and luxurious collection that surpassed its eco-conscious message. Staged on a black and white-striped runway, the show had design fiends spoilt for choice, with an abundance of folksy monochrome prints that packed a graphic punch. Printed collarless jackets blended seamlessly with basket-weave leather crop tops worn over sheer tunics. The layering offered the brand a newly cool, modern sophistication and highlighted the design pedigree of Sherman, who helped launch The Row and helmed Alexander Wang's T line for five years. Throw in sleek skirts amped up with thigh-high slits and the odd piece of sustainable jewellery in crystal and horn, and you get a solid debut that heralds an exciting new era for the pioneering fashion brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

When it comes to ethical fashion, few brands can compare to Edun. The label took it up a notch this season, with its new creative director Danielle Sherman turning out a confident and luxurious collection that surpassed its eco-conscious message. Staged on a black and white-striped runway, the show had design fiends spoilt for choice, with an abundance of folksy monochrome prints that packed a graphic punch. Printed collarless jackets blended seamlessly with basket-weave leather crop tops worn over sheer tunics. The layering offered the brand a newly cool, modern sophistication and highlighted the design pedigree of Sherman, who helped launch The Row and helmed Alexander Wang's T line for five years. Throw in sleek skirts amped up with thigh-high slits and the odd piece of sustainable jewellery in crystal and horn, and you get a solid debut that heralds an exciting new era for the pioneering fashion brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

When it comes to ethical fashion, few brands can compare to Edun. The label took it up a notch this season, with its new creative director Danielle Sherman turning out a confident and luxurious collection that surpassed its eco-conscious message. Staged on a black and white-striped runway, the show had design fiends spoilt for choice, with an abundance of folksy monochrome prints that packed a graphic punch. Printed collarless jackets blended seamlessly with basket-weave leather crop tops worn over sheer tunics. The layering offered the brand a newly cool, modern sophistication and highlighted the design pedigree of Sherman, who helped launch The Row and helmed Alexander Wang's T line for five years. Throw in sleek skirts amped up with thigh-high slits and the odd piece of sustainable jewellery in crystal and horn, and you get a solid debut that heralds an exciting new era for the pioneering fashion brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

When it comes to ethical fashion, few brands can compare to Edun. The label took it up a notch this season, with its new creative director Danielle Sherman turning out a confident and luxurious collection that surpassed its eco-conscious message. Staged on a black and white-striped runway, the show had design fiends spoilt for choice, with an abundance of folksy monochrome prints that packed a graphic punch. Printed collarless jackets blended seamlessly with basket-weave leather crop tops worn over sheer tunics. The layering offered the brand a newly cool, modern sophistication and highlighted the design pedigree of Sherman, who helped launch The Row and helmed Alexander Wang's T line for five years. Throw in sleek skirts amped up with thigh-high slits and the odd piece of sustainable jewellery in crystal and horn, and you get a solid debut that heralds an exciting new era for the pioneering fashion brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Edun

When it comes to ethical fashion, few brands can compare to Edun. The label took it up a notch this season, with its new creative director Danielle Sherman turning out a confident and luxurious collection that surpassed its eco-conscious message. Staged on a black and white-striped runway, the show had design fiends spoilt for choice, with an abundance of folksy monochrome prints that packed a graphic punch. Printed collarless jackets blended seamlessly with basket-weave leather crop tops worn over sheer tunics. The layering offered the brand a newly cool, modern sophistication and highlighted the design pedigree of Sherman, who helped launch The Row and helmed Alexander Wang's T line for five years. Throw in sleek skirts amped up with thigh-high slits and the odd piece of sustainable jewellery in crystal and horn, and you get a solid debut that heralds an exciting new era for the pioneering fashion brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Opening Ceremony

Easily the hottest ticket in New York this season, Opening Ceremony had a high benchmark to hit with its first-ever runway presentation. The downtown darling exceeded expectations by turning its industrial pier-side venue into a SoCal race-car showcase, with models emerging from souped-up Lamborghinis and BMWs before circling the perimeter. A homage to the label’s Asian-American heritage set the tone with robe-like silhouettes, fold-over details and Eastern-inspired prints, from tiny florals to scenic landscapes. The latter looks made the most of the race-car theme, with men and women donning padded motocross-style sweatshirts, jaunty shorts and swing skirts in eye-catching checks or swirling graphics reminiscent of product decals. After the presentation, the models (auto and human) remained so the audience could peruse in closer proximity. It was proof that founders Carol Lim and Humberto Leon couldn't be more dialled in to knowing what people want. Guests continued on to the revived Pier 57, where an Opening Ceremony-approved assemblage of food stalls and mini brand boutiques kept them partying into the night.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Opening Ceremony

Easily the hottest ticket in New York this season, Opening Ceremony had a high benchmark to hit with its first-ever runway presentation. The downtown darling exceeded expectations by turning its industrial pier-side venue into a SoCal race-car showcase, with models emerging from souped-up Lamborghinis and BMWs before circling the perimeter. A homage to the label’s Asian-American heritage set the tone with robe-like silhouettes, fold-over details and Eastern-inspired prints, from tiny florals to scenic landscapes. The latter looks made the most of the race-car theme, with men and women donning padded motocross-style sweatshirts, jaunty shorts and swing skirts in eye-catching checks or swirling graphics reminiscent of product decals. After the presentation, the models (auto and human) remained so the audience could peruse in closer proximity. It was proof that founders Carol Lim and Humberto Leon couldn't be more dialled in to knowing what people want. Guests continued on to the revived Pier 57, where an Opening Ceremony-approved assemblage of food stalls and mini brand boutiques kept them partying into the night.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Opening Ceremony

Easily the hottest ticket in New York this season, Opening Ceremony had a high benchmark to hit with its first-ever runway presentation. The downtown darling exceeded expectations by turning its industrial pier-side venue into a SoCal race-car showcase, with models emerging from souped-up Lamborghinis and BMWs before circling the perimeter. A homage to the label’s Asian-American heritage set the tone with robe-like silhouettes, fold-over details and Eastern-inspired prints, from tiny florals to scenic landscapes. The latter looks made the most of the race-car theme, with men and women donning padded motocross-style sweatshirts, jaunty shorts and swing skirts in eye-catching checks or swirling graphics reminiscent of product decals. After the presentation, the models (auto and human) remained so the audience could peruse in closer proximity. It was proof that founders Carol Lim and Humberto Leon couldn't be more dialled in to knowing what people want. Guests continued on to the revived Pier 57, where an Opening Ceremony-approved assemblage of food stalls and mini brand boutiques kept them partying into the night.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Opening Ceremony

Easily the hottest ticket in New York this season, Opening Ceremony had a high benchmark to hit with its first-ever runway presentation. The downtown darling exceeded expectations by turning its industrial pier-side venue into a SoCal race-car showcase, with models emerging from souped-up Lamborghinis and BMWs before circling the perimeter. A homage to the label’s Asian-American heritage set the tone with robe-like silhouettes, fold-over details and Eastern-inspired prints, from tiny florals to scenic landscapes. The latter looks made the most of the race-car theme, with men and women donning padded motocross-style sweatshirts, jaunty shorts and swing skirts in eye-catching checks or swirling graphics reminiscent of product decals. After the presentation, the models (auto and human) remained so the audience could peruse in closer proximity. It was proof that founders Carol Lim and Humberto Leon couldn't be more dialled in to knowing what people want. Guests continued on to the revived Pier 57, where an Opening Ceremony-approved assemblage of food stalls and mini brand boutiques kept them partying into the night.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Opening Ceremony

Easily the hottest ticket in New York this season, Opening Ceremony had a high benchmark to hit with its first-ever runway presentation. The downtown darling exceeded expectations by turning its industrial pier-side venue into a SoCal race-car showcase, with models emerging from souped-up Lamborghinis and BMWs before circling the perimeter. A homage to the label’s Asian-American heritage set the tone with robe-like silhouettes, fold-over details and Eastern-inspired prints, from tiny florals to scenic landscapes. The latter looks made the most of the race-car theme, with men and women donning padded motocross-style sweatshirts, jaunty shorts and swing skirts in eye-catching checks or swirling graphics reminiscent of product decals. After the presentation, the models (auto and human) remained so the audience could peruse in closer proximity. It was proof that founders Carol Lim and Humberto Leon couldn't be more dialled in to knowing what people want. Guests continued on to the revived Pier 57, where an Opening Ceremony-approved assemblage of food stalls and mini brand boutiques kept them partying into the night.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

The surf was up at Tommy Hilfiger's distinctly summer-leaning show, with the designer transporting the coast to the city in the form of a boardwalk runway set among sand dunes. Here, Hilfiger's usual agenda of collegiate prep was traded in for another aspect of Americana: surfing. The opening brigade made full use of the contrast detailing, as well as the structured shape of neoprene wetsuits and rash guards – albeit in leather. ‘The West Coast represents a golden era of surf, sport and optimism,’ says Hilfiger, a statement that summed up the sun-washed pastels and saturated hues of the collection. Quintessential American shapes – such as the polo, varsity jacket, sports jersey and bowling shirt – all received a reworking in the form of zip-up dresses and slouchy tunics, paired with colour blocked sandals and high-top wedge sneakers. Tailoring, a growing field in the Hilfiger catalogue also had some worthy entries; a slinky red suit was particularly memorable. All in all, a refreshing change-up for the New York stalwart who had us wishing summer would hang around just a little bit longer.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

The surf was up at Tommy Hilfiger's distinctly summer-leaning show, with the designer transporting the coast to the city in the form of a boardwalk runway set among sand dunes. Here, Hilfiger's usual agenda of collegiate prep was traded in for another aspect of Americana: surfing. The opening brigade made full use of the contrast detailing, as well as the structured shape of neoprene wetsuits and rash guards – albeit in leather. ‘The West Coast represents a golden era of surf, sport and optimism,’ says Hilfiger, a statement that summed up the sun-washed pastels and saturated hues of the collection. Quintessential American shapes – such as the polo, varsity jacket, sports jersey and bowling shirt – all received a reworking in the form of zip-up dresses and slouchy tunics, paired with colour blocked sandals and high-top wedge sneakers. Tailoring, a growing field in the Hilfiger catalogue also had some worthy entries; a slinky red suit was particularly memorable. All in all, a refreshing change-up for the New York stalwart who had us wishing summer would hang around just a little bit longer.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

The surf was up at Tommy Hilfiger's distinctly summer-leaning show, with the designer transporting the coast to the city in the form of a boardwalk runway set among sand dunes. Here, Hilfiger's usual agenda of collegiate prep was traded in for another aspect of Americana: surfing. The opening brigade made full use of the contrast detailing, as well as the structured shape of neoprene wetsuits and rash guards – albeit in leather. ‘The West Coast represents a golden era of surf, sport and optimism,’ says Hilfiger, a statement that summed up the sun-washed pastels and saturated hues of the collection. Quintessential American shapes – such as the polo, varsity jacket, sports jersey and bowling shirt – all received a reworking in the form of zip-up dresses and slouchy tunics, paired with colour blocked sandals and high-top wedge sneakers. Tailoring, a growing field in the Hilfiger catalogue also had some worthy entries; a slinky red suit was particularly memorable. All in all, a refreshing change-up for the New York stalwart who had us wishing summer would hang around just a little bit longer.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

The surf was up at Tommy Hilfiger's distinctly summer-leaning show, with the designer transporting the coast to the city in the form of a boardwalk runway set among sand dunes. Here, Hilfiger's usual agenda of collegiate prep was traded in for another aspect of Americana: surfing. The opening brigade made full use of the contrast detailing, as well as the structured shape of neoprene wetsuits and rash guards – albeit in leather. ‘The West Coast represents a golden era of surf, sport and optimism,’ says Hilfiger, a statement that summed up the sun-washed pastels and saturated hues of the collection. Quintessential American shapes – such as the polo, varsity jacket, sports jersey and bowling shirt – all received a reworking in the form of zip-up dresses and slouchy tunics, paired with colour blocked sandals and high-top wedge sneakers. Tailoring, a growing field in the Hilfiger catalogue also had some worthy entries; a slinky red suit was particularly memorable. All in all, a refreshing change-up for the New York stalwart who had us wishing summer would hang around just a little bit longer.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Tommy Hilfiger

The surf was up at Tommy Hilfiger's distinctly summer-leaning show, with the designer transporting the coast to the city in the form of a boardwalk runway set among sand dunes. Here, Hilfiger's usual agenda of collegiate prep was traded in for another aspect of Americana: surfing. The opening brigade made full use of the contrast detailing, as well as the structured shape of neoprene wetsuits and rash guards – albeit in leather. ‘The West Coast represents a golden era of surf, sport and optimism,’ says Hilfiger, a statement that summed up the sun-washed pastels and saturated hues of the collection. Quintessential American shapes – such as the polo, varsity jacket, sports jersey and bowling shirt – all received a reworking in the form of zip-up dresses and slouchy tunics, paired with colour blocked sandals and high-top wedge sneakers. Tailoring, a growing field in the Hilfiger catalogue also had some worthy entries; a slinky red suit was particularly memorable. All in all, a refreshing change-up for the New York stalwart who had us wishing summer would hang around just a little bit longer.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Ohne Titel

One might think that classical and avant-garde design can only exist at polar ends of the fashion spectrum, but for Alexa Adams and Flora Gill the two are often harmoniously combined. The designers described this season’s effort as ‘a play on sheer and solid surfaces, with an emphasis on technique, linear pattern and a brushstroke colour effect.’ There's no denying the technical prowess of the duo, who have often develop their own bespoke textiles to suit particular projects. To wit, the pair presented spirited experimentations in knitwear, ranging from fine gauge knit sheath dresses to textured sweaters and trousers detailed with nylon mesh. The splicing of cotton poplin, leather and sheer chiffon to form jackets, shorts and vests was particularly inspiring. Hues ranged from demure blush and nude tones to striking aqua and royal blues, often appearing in bold, swirling strokes across the body. Apart from the dynamic knits, the designers also embraced stripes in endless arrangements to pack a final visual punch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Ohne Titel

One might think that classical and avant-garde design can only exist at polar ends of the fashion spectrum, but for Alexa Adams and Flora Gill the two are often harmoniously combined. The designers described this season’s effort as ‘a play on sheer and solid surfaces, with an emphasis on technique, linear pattern and a brushstroke colour effect.’ There's no denying the technical prowess of the duo, who have often develop their own bespoke textiles to suit particular projects. To wit, the pair presented spirited experimentations in knitwear, ranging from fine gauge knit sheath dresses to textured sweaters and trousers detailed with nylon mesh. The splicing of cotton poplin, leather and sheer chiffon to form jackets, shorts and vests was particularly inspiring. Hues ranged from demure blush and nude tones to striking aqua and royal blues, often appearing in bold, swirling strokes across the body. Apart from the dynamic knits, the designers also embraced stripes in endless arrangements to pack a final visual punch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Ohne Titel

One might think that classical and avant-garde design can only exist at polar ends of the fashion spectrum, but for Alexa Adams and Flora Gill the two are often harmoniously combined. The designers described this season’s effort as ‘a play on sheer and solid surfaces, with an emphasis on technique, linear pattern and a brushstroke colour effect.’ There's no denying the technical prowess of the duo, who have often develop their own bespoke textiles to suit particular projects. To wit, the pair presented spirited experimentations in knitwear, ranging from fine gauge knit sheath dresses to textured sweaters and trousers detailed with nylon mesh. The splicing of cotton poplin, leather and sheer chiffon to form jackets, shorts and vests was particularly inspiring. Hues ranged from demure blush and nude tones to striking aqua and royal blues, often appearing in bold, swirling strokes across the body. Apart from the dynamic knits, the designers also embraced stripes in endless arrangements to pack a final visual punch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Ohne Titel

One might think that classical and avant-garde design can only exist at polar ends of the fashion spectrum, but for Alexa Adams and Flora Gill the two are often harmoniously combined. The designers described this season’s effort as ‘a play on sheer and solid surfaces, with an emphasis on technique, linear pattern and a brushstroke colour effect.’ There's no denying the technical prowess of the duo, who have often develop their own bespoke textiles to suit particular projects. To wit, the pair presented spirited experimentations in knitwear, ranging from fine gauge knit sheath dresses to textured sweaters and trousers detailed with nylon mesh. The splicing of cotton poplin, leather and sheer chiffon to form jackets, shorts and vests was particularly inspiring. Hues ranged from demure blush and nude tones to striking aqua and royal blues, often appearing in bold, swirling strokes across the body. Apart from the dynamic knits, the designers also embraced stripes in endless arrangements to pack a final visual punch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Ohne Titel

One might think that classical and avant-garde design can only exist at polar ends of the fashion spectrum, but for Alexa Adams and Flora Gill the two are often harmoniously combined. The designers described this season’s effort as ‘a play on sheer and solid surfaces, with an emphasis on technique, linear pattern and a brushstroke colour effect.’ There's no denying the technical prowess of the duo, who have often develop their own bespoke textiles to suit particular projects. To wit, the pair presented spirited experimentations in knitwear, ranging from fine gauge knit sheath dresses to textured sweaters and trousers detailed with nylon mesh. The splicing of cotton poplin, leather and sheer chiffon to form jackets, shorts and vests was particularly inspiring. Hues ranged from demure blush and nude tones to striking aqua and royal blues, often appearing in bold, swirling strokes across the body. Apart from the dynamic knits, the designers also embraced stripes in endless arrangements to pack a final visual punch.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

3.1 Phillip Lim

The worldly halls of fashion and Earth’s molten core may lay mesospheres apart but New York-based designer Phillip Lim brought them together in his compelling Spring offering. Lim’s big-brained riff on geological formations and terrains was translated into a combustive graphic schematic. The natural swirling motifs of minerals found their way onto the clothing, both in geode, faux bois and moiré prints as well as ornate jacquards that played on rich textures. The overall effect was organic and handcrafted, yet avoided a folksy turn thanks to Lim’s clean, sporty silhouettes and his calculated use of graphic patterns. Tops were almost all sculpted into box-shapes, from cropped jackets to sheer sweatshirts to structured white blouses. Lim proved himself not only likeable among geologists this season (who would’ve surely approved of his rock salt runway), but also with the arts and crafts artisans whose collages were surely an influence in the designer’s beautiful mélange of materials, which effortlessly seamed up panels of fringe, embroidery, bonded leather and silk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

The worldly halls of fashion and Earth’s molten core may lay mesospheres apart but New York-based designer Phillip Lim brought them together in his compelling Spring offering. Lim’s big-brained riff on geological formations and terrains was translated into a combustive graphic schematic. The natural swirling motifs of minerals found their way onto the clothing, both in geode, faux bois and moiré prints as well as ornate jacquards that played on rich textures. The overall effect was organic and handcrafted, yet avoided a folksy turn thanks to Lim’s clean, sporty silhouettes and his calculated use of graphic patterns. Tops were almost all sculpted into box-shapes, from cropped jackets to sheer sweatshirts to structured white blouses. Lim proved himself not only likeable among geologists this season (who would’ve surely approved of his rock salt runway), but also with the arts and crafts artisans whose collages were surely an influence in the designer’s beautiful mélange of materials, which effortlessly seamed up panels of fringe, embroidery, bonded leather and silk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

The worldly halls of fashion and Earth’s molten core may lay mesospheres apart but New York-based designer Phillip Lim brought them together in his compelling Spring offering. Lim’s big-brained riff on geological formations and terrains was translated into a combustive graphic schematic. The natural swirling motifs of minerals found their way onto the clothing, both in geode, faux bois and moiré prints as well as ornate jacquards that played on rich textures. The overall effect was organic and handcrafted, yet avoided a folksy turn thanks to Lim’s clean, sporty silhouettes and his calculated use of graphic patterns. Tops were almost all sculpted into box-shapes, from cropped jackets to sheer sweatshirts to structured white blouses. Lim proved himself not only likeable among geologists this season (who would’ve surely approved of his rock salt runway), but also with the arts and crafts artisans whose collages were surely an influence in the designer’s beautiful mélange of materials, which effortlessly seamed up panels of fringe, embroidery, bonded leather and silk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

The worldly halls of fashion and Earth’s molten core may lay mesospheres apart but New York-based designer Phillip Lim brought them together in his compelling Spring offering. Lim’s big-brained riff on geological formations and terrains was translated into a combustive graphic schematic. The natural swirling motifs of minerals found their way onto the clothing, both in geode, faux bois and moiré prints as well as ornate jacquards that played on rich textures. The overall effect was organic and handcrafted, yet avoided a folksy turn thanks to Lim’s clean, sporty silhouettes and his calculated use of graphic patterns. Tops were almost all sculpted into box-shapes, from cropped jackets to sheer sweatshirts to structured white blouses. Lim proved himself not only likeable among geologists this season (who would’ve surely approved of his rock salt runway), but also with the arts and crafts artisans whose collages were surely an influence in the designer’s beautiful mélange of materials, which effortlessly seamed up panels of fringe, embroidery, bonded leather and silk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

3.1 Phillip Lim

The worldly halls of fashion and Earth’s molten core may lay mesospheres apart but New York-based designer Phillip Lim brought them together in his compelling Spring offering. Lim’s big-brained riff on geological formations and terrains was translated into a combustive graphic schematic. The natural swirling motifs of minerals found their way onto the clothing, both in geode, faux bois and moiré prints as well as ornate jacquards that played on rich textures. The overall effect was organic and handcrafted, yet avoided a folksy turn thanks to Lim’s clean, sporty silhouettes and his calculated use of graphic patterns. Tops were almost all sculpted into box-shapes, from cropped jackets to sheer sweatshirts to structured white blouses. Lim proved himself not only likeable among geologists this season (who would’ve surely approved of his rock salt runway), but also with the arts and crafts artisans whose collages were surely an influence in the designer’s beautiful mélange of materials, which effortlessly seamed up panels of fringe, embroidery, bonded leather and silk.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's signature silhouette took a trip across the globe to India this season. The veteran designer's exotic vision centred on a hand-blocked print scarf, draped simply and seductively to form wrap dresses underneath deconstructed balmacaan coats. The colour palette further referenced the far-flung landscape; chambray blue and earthy terracotta shades gave the collection a desert-like feel. Karan's skill lies in her ability to complement structured men's-inspired pieces with more voluptuous separates. In this collection, blouse-y tunics both masculine and alluring were teamed with hand-embroidered silk skirts adorned with jewels. The collection's nomadic vibe triumphed in decorative kaftans with embellished skirts sliced teasingly high up the leg. Finished off with vegetable-tanned leather accessories and hats by master milliner Stephen Jones, the collection took us on an evocative journey to the East.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's signature silhouette took a trip across the globe to India this season. The veteran designer's exotic vision centred on a hand-blocked print scarf, draped simply and seductively to form wrap dresses underneath deconstructed balmacaan coats. The colour palette further referenced the far-flung landscape; chambray blue and earthy terracotta shades gave the collection a desert-like feel. Karan's skill lies in her ability to complement structured men's-inspired pieces with more voluptuous separates. In this collection, blouse-y tunics both masculine and alluring were teamed with hand-embroidered silk skirts adorned with jewels. The collection's nomadic vibe triumphed in decorative kaftans with embellished skirts sliced teasingly high up the leg. Finished off with vegetable-tanned leather accessories and hats by master milliner Stephen Jones, the collection took us on an evocative journey to the East.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's signature silhouette took a trip across the globe to India this season. The veteran designer's exotic vision centred on a hand-blocked print scarf, draped simply and seductively to form wrap dresses underneath deconstructed balmacaan coats. The colour palette further referenced the far-flung landscape; chambray blue and earthy terracotta shades gave the collection a desert-like feel. Karan's skill lies in her ability to complement structured men's-inspired pieces with more voluptuous separates. In this collection, blouse-y tunics both masculine and alluring were teamed with hand-embroidered silk skirts adorned with jewels. The collection's nomadic vibe triumphed in decorative kaftans with embellished skirts sliced teasingly high up the leg. Finished off with vegetable-tanned leather accessories and hats by master milliner Stephen Jones, the collection took us on an evocative journey to the East.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's signature silhouette took a trip across the globe to India this season. The veteran designer's exotic vision centred on a hand-blocked print scarf, draped simply and seductively to form wrap dresses underneath deconstructed balmacaan coats. The colour palette further referenced the far-flung landscape; chambray blue and earthy terracotta shades gave the collection a desert-like feel. Karan's skill lies in her ability to complement structured men's-inspired pieces with more voluptuous separates. In this collection, blouse-y tunics both masculine and alluring were teamed with hand-embroidered silk skirts adorned with jewels. The collection's nomadic vibe triumphed in decorative kaftans with embellished skirts sliced teasingly high up the leg. Finished off with vegetable-tanned leather accessories and hats by master milliner Stephen Jones, the collection took us on an evocative journey to the East.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Donna Karan

Donna Karan's signature silhouette took a trip across the globe to India this season. The veteran designer's exotic vision centred on a hand-blocked print scarf, draped simply and seductively to form wrap dresses underneath deconstructed balmacaan coats. The colour palette further referenced the far-flung landscape; chambray blue and earthy terracotta shades gave the collection a desert-like feel. Karan's skill lies in her ability to complement structured men's-inspired pieces with more voluptuous separates. In this collection, blouse-y tunics both masculine and alluring were teamed with hand-embroidered silk skirts adorned with jewels. The collection's nomadic vibe triumphed in decorative kaftans with embellished skirts sliced teasingly high up the leg. Finished off with vegetable-tanned leather accessories and hats by master milliner Stephen Jones, the collection took us on an evocative journey to the East.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Thom Browne

Welcome to the madhouse. This season Browne presented his fashion set as an insane asylum run by a crew of lace-clad nurses. Sporting powdered bouffants swept into pearl-embellished hair nets, round spectacles and thick white pantyhose, the nurses served both as the clinic's in-residence evildoers and custodians of the model patients who staggered onto the stage in extravagant couture concoctions, their lips smeared and waists cinched impossibly tight. There was distinct whiff of Helena Bonham Carter's eccentric style, but wacky theatrics aside: the collection was simply outstanding. Browne continues to remain the only designer in New York capable of matching the technical excellence of his couture-trained counterparts in Europe. The all-white collection, featuring highly sculptural petticoat dresses and A-line skirts, flaunted not only reams of achingly expensive lace, jacquards and brocade, but also the designer’s innate dexterity to cut and sew them together skilfully. Browne’s women may have been teetering on the brink of madness – and high-heeled oxfords – but the designer proved himself to be as even-keeled and confident as ever.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Thom Browne

Welcome to the madhouse. This season Browne presented his fashion set as an insane asylum run by a crew of lace-clad nurses. Sporting powdered bouffants swept into pearl-embellished hair nets, round spectacles and thick white pantyhose, the nurses served both as the clinic's in-residence evildoers and custodians of the model patients who staggered onto the stage in extravagant couture concoctions, their lips smeared and waists cinched impossibly tight. There was distinct whiff of Helena Bonham Carter's eccentric style, but wacky theatrics aside: the collection was simply outstanding. Browne continues to remain the only designer in New York capable of matching the technical excellence of his couture-trained counterparts in Europe. The all-white collection, featuring highly sculptural petticoat dresses and A-line skirts, flaunted not only reams of achingly expensive lace, jacquards and brocade, but also the designer’s innate dexterity to cut and sew them together skilfully. Browne’s women may have been teetering on the brink of madness – and high-heeled oxfords – but the designer proved himself to be as even-keeled and confident as ever.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Thom Browne

Welcome to the madhouse. This season Browne presented his fashion set as an insane asylum run by a crew of lace-clad nurses. Sporting powdered bouffants swept into pearl-embellished hair nets, round spectacles and thick white pantyhose, the nurses served both as the clinic's in-residence evildoers and custodians of the model patients who staggered onto the stage in extravagant couture concoctions, their lips smeared and waists cinched impossibly tight. There was distinct whiff of Helena Bonham Carter's eccentric style, but wacky theatrics aside: the collection was simply outstanding. Browne continues to remain the only designer in New York capable of matching the technical excellence of his couture-trained counterparts in Europe. The all-white collection, featuring highly sculptural petticoat dresses and A-line skirts, flaunted not only reams of achingly expensive lace, jacquards and brocade, but also the designer’s innate dexterity to cut and sew them together skilfully. Browne’s women may have been teetering on the brink of madness – and high-heeled oxfords – but the designer proved himself to be as even-keeled and confident as ever.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Thom Browne

Welcome to the madhouse. This season Browne presented his fashion set as an insane asylum run by a crew of lace-clad nurses. Sporting powdered bouffants swept into pearl-embellished hair nets, round spectacles and thick white pantyhose, the nurses served both as the clinic's in-residence evildoers and custodians of the model patients who staggered onto the stage in extravagant couture concoctions, their lips smeared and waists cinched impossibly tight. There was distinct whiff of Helena Bonham Carter's eccentric style, but wacky theatrics aside: the collection was simply outstanding. Browne continues to remain the only designer in New York capable of matching the technical excellence of his couture-trained counterparts in Europe. The all-white collection, featuring highly sculptural petticoat dresses and A-line skirts, flaunted not only reams of achingly expensive lace, jacquards and brocade, but also the designer’s innate dexterity to cut and sew them together skilfully. Browne’s women may have been teetering on the brink of madness – and high-heeled oxfords – but the designer proved himself to be as even-keeled and confident as ever.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Thom Browne

Welcome to the madhouse. This season Browne presented his fashion set as an insane asylum run by a crew of lace-clad nurses. Sporting powdered bouffants swept into pearl-embellished hair nets, round spectacles and thick white pantyhose, the nurses served both as the clinic's in-residence evildoers and custodians of the model patients who staggered onto the stage in extravagant couture concoctions, their lips smeared and waists cinched impossibly tight. There was distinct whiff of Helena Bonham Carter's eccentric style, but wacky theatrics aside: the collection was simply outstanding. Browne continues to remain the only designer in New York capable of matching the technical excellence of his couture-trained counterparts in Europe. The all-white collection, featuring highly sculptural petticoat dresses and A-line skirts, flaunted not only reams of achingly expensive lace, jacquards and brocade, but also the designer’s innate dexterity to cut and sew them together skilfully. Browne’s women may have been teetering on the brink of madness – and high-heeled oxfords – but the designer proved himself to be as even-keeled and confident as ever.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

J. Crew

Tom Mora, head of womenwear design, applied his Midas touch for stylish, casual fashion to the brand's new collection with full strength. Inspired by the laid-back cool of Californian beach culture, the label turned out beautiful, detail-oriented looks with retro numbers, such as tapered trousers, an ‘aloha’ shirt and vintage floral-printed tea dresses in a modern neon palette. Footwear designed in collaboration with Sophia Webster was another highlight, with stiletto pumps emblazoned with punchy patterns striding down the runway. On the menswear front, Frank Muytjens ran with a clean-cut, outdoorsy theme that paid tribute to the many national parks around the country. Leaf-printed utility parkas were paired with tailored short suits and crisp, sun-bleached shirting.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

J. Crew

Tom Mora, head of womenwear design, applied his Midas touch for stylish, casual fashion to the brand's new collection with full strength. Inspired by the laid-back cool of Californian beach culture, the label turned out beautiful, detail-oriented looks with retro numbers, such as tapered trousers, an ‘aloha’ shirt and vintage floral-printed tea dresses in a modern neon palette. Footwear designed in collaboration with Sophia Webster was another highlight, with stiletto pumps emblazoned with punchy patterns striding down the runway. On the menswear front, Frank Muytjens ran with a clean-cut, outdoorsy theme that paid tribute to the many national parks around the country. Leaf-printed utility parkas were paired with tailored short suits and crisp, sun-bleached shirting.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

J. Crew

Tom Mora, head of womenwear design, applied his Midas touch for stylish, casual fashion to the brand's new collection with full strength. Inspired by the laid-back cool of Californian beach culture, the label turned out beautiful, detail-oriented looks with retro numbers, such as tapered trousers, an ‘aloha’ shirt and vintage floral-printed tea dresses in a modern neon palette. Footwear designed in collaboration with Sophia Webster was another highlight, with stiletto pumps emblazoned with punchy patterns striding down the runway. On the menswear front, Frank Muytjens ran with a clean-cut, outdoorsy theme that paid tribute to the many national parks around the country. Leaf-printed utility parkas were paired with tailored short suits and crisp, sun-bleached shirting.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

J. Crew

Tom Mora, head of womenwear design, applied his Midas touch for stylish, casual fashion to the brand's new collection with full strength. Inspired by the laid-back cool of Californian beach culture, the label turned out beautiful, detail-oriented looks with retro numbers, such as tapered trousers, an ‘aloha’ shirt and vintage floral-printed tea dresses in a modern neon palette. Footwear designed in collaboration with Sophia Webster was another highlight, with stiletto pumps emblazoned with punchy patterns striding down the runway. On the menswear front, Frank Muytjens ran with a clean-cut, outdoorsy theme that paid tribute to the many national parks around the country. Leaf-printed utility parkas were paired with tailored short suits and crisp, sun-bleached shirting.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

J. Crew

Tom Mora, head of womenwear design, applied his Midas touch for stylish, casual fashion to the brand's new collection with full strength. Inspired by the laid-back cool of Californian beach culture, the label turned out beautiful, detail-oriented looks with retro numbers, such as tapered trousers, an ‘aloha’ shirt and vintage floral-printed tea dresses in a modern neon palette. Footwear designed in collaboration with Sophia Webster was another highlight, with stiletto pumps emblazoned with punchy patterns striding down the runway. On the menswear front, Frank Muytjens ran with a clean-cut, outdoorsy theme that paid tribute to the many national parks around the country. Leaf-printed utility parkas were paired with tailored short suits and crisp, sun-bleached shirting.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Rodarte

Rodarte’s Spring collection could be summed up in two words: ‘Rodeo Rap’. Sisters Laura and Kate Mulleavy were, after all, born and bred in Los Angeles – the birthplace of rap and hip hop’s achingly cool music scenes. The pair are still based there, so it wasn't a shock to see slouchy silk shirts printed with plaid; baseball caps slung backwards; studded suspenders; and some serious bling strung over their trash-cum-flash creations. What was less expected from the duo however, was the plunge into cowboy grunge – a theme that came charging down the runway like a bucking bronco in ankle booties. Denim shorts hemmed with satin ruffles were slashed to hot pants-proportions, asymmetrical skirts flashed plenty of skin through hip-grazing slits and brocade vests peeked from under leopard print blazers. It was a wild, raucous ride with the collection being trimmed in enough fringe to cover a lap dance lounge. According to these trendsetting sisters, bad girls are back - much to our delight.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rodarte

Rodarte’s Spring collection could be summed up in two words: ‘Rodeo Rap’. Sisters Laura and Kate Mulleavy were, after all, born and bred in Los Angeles – the birthplace of rap and hip hop’s achingly cool music scenes. The pair are still based there, so it wasn't a shock to see slouchy silk shirts printed with plaid; baseball caps slung backwards; studded suspenders; and some serious bling strung over their trash-cum-flash creations. What was less expected from the duo however, was the plunge into cowboy grunge – a theme that came charging down the runway like a bucking bronco in ankle booties. Denim shorts hemmed with satin ruffles were slashed to hot pants-proportions, asymmetrical skirts flashed plenty of skin through hip-grazing slits and brocade vests peeked from under leopard print blazers. It was a wild, raucous ride with the collection being trimmed in enough fringe to cover a lap dance lounge. According to these trendsetting sisters, bad girls are back - much to our delight.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rodarte

Rodarte’s Spring collection could be summed up in two words: ‘Rodeo Rap’. Sisters Laura and Kate Mulleavy were, after all, born and bred in Los Angeles – the birthplace of rap and hip hop’s achingly cool music scenes. The pair are still based there, so it wasn't a shock to see slouchy silk shirts printed with plaid; baseball caps slung backwards; studded suspenders; and some serious bling strung over their trash-cum-flash creations. What was less expected from the duo however, was the plunge into cowboy grunge – a theme that came charging down the runway like a bucking bronco in ankle booties. Denim shorts hemmed with satin ruffles were slashed to hot pants-proportions, asymmetrical skirts flashed plenty of skin through hip-grazing slits and brocade vests peeked from under leopard print blazers. It was a wild, raucous ride with the collection being trimmed in enough fringe to cover a lap dance lounge. According to these trendsetting sisters, bad girls are back - much to our delight.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rodarte

Rodarte’s Spring collection could be summed up in two words: ‘Rodeo Rap’. Sisters Laura and Kate Mulleavy were, after all, born and bred in Los Angeles – the birthplace of rap and hip hop’s achingly cool music scenes. The pair are still based there, so it wasn't a shock to see slouchy silk shirts printed with plaid; baseball caps slung backwards; studded suspenders; and some serious bling strung over their trash-cum-flash creations. What was less expected from the duo however, was the plunge into cowboy grunge – a theme that came charging down the runway like a bucking bronco in ankle booties. Denim shorts hemmed with satin ruffles were slashed to hot pants-proportions, asymmetrical skirts flashed plenty of skin through hip-grazing slits and brocade vests peeked from under leopard print blazers. It was a wild, raucous ride with the collection being trimmed in enough fringe to cover a lap dance lounge. According to these trendsetting sisters, bad girls are back - much to our delight.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rodarte

Rodarte’s Spring collection could be summed up in two words: ‘Rodeo Rap’. Sisters Laura and Kate Mulleavy were, after all, born and bred in Los Angeles – the birthplace of rap and hip hop’s achingly cool music scenes. The pair are still based there, so it wasn't a shock to see slouchy silk shirts printed with plaid; baseball caps slung backwards; studded suspenders; and some serious bling strung over their trash-cum-flash creations. What was less expected from the duo however, was the plunge into cowboy grunge – a theme that came charging down the runway like a bucking bronco in ankle booties. Denim shorts hemmed with satin ruffles were slashed to hot pants-proportions, asymmetrical skirts flashed plenty of skin through hip-grazing slits and brocade vests peeked from under leopard print blazers. It was a wild, raucous ride with the collection being trimmed in enough fringe to cover a lap dance lounge. According to these trendsetting sisters, bad girls are back - much to our delight.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Diesel Black Gold

The tough-as-nails, rock ‘n' roll spirit of Diesel Black Gold ventured to the Wild West this season with a womenswear collection flush with cowboy references. Grommets, leather laces and cotton eyelets were just some of the details that came together to give ensembles a rebellious, self-assured appeal. The prairie inspiration, which was apparent from the layering of leather vests, moto jackets, square-necked silk tops and chic mini-skirts, was reinforced by studded ankle boots and tousled French braids. Of course, no Diesel show would be complete without denim. This season's offerings were dished out in distressed pastels, and printed with a snakeskin-like tie-dye.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Diesel Black Gold

The tough-as-nails, rock ‘n' roll spirit of Diesel Black Gold ventured to the Wild West this season with a womenswear collection flush with cowboy references. Grommets, leather laces and cotton eyelets were just some of the details that came together to give ensembles a rebellious, self-assured appeal. The prairie inspiration, which was apparent from the layering of leather vests, moto jackets, square-necked silk tops and chic mini-skirts, was reinforced by studded ankle boots and tousled French braids. Of course, no Diesel show would be complete without denim. This season's offerings were dished out in distressed pastels, and printed with a snakeskin-like tie-dye.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Diesel Black Gold

The tough-as-nails, rock ‘n' roll spirit of Diesel Black Gold ventured to the Wild West this season with a womenswear collection flush with cowboy references. Grommets, leather laces and cotton eyelets were just some of the details that came together to give ensembles a rebellious, self-assured appeal. The prairie inspiration, which was apparent from the layering of leather vests, moto jackets, square-necked silk tops and chic mini-skirts, was reinforced by studded ankle boots and tousled French braids. Of course, no Diesel show would be complete without denim. This season's offerings were dished out in distressed pastels, and printed with a snakeskin-like tie-dye.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Diesel Black Gold

The tough-as-nails, rock ‘n' roll spirit of Diesel Black Gold ventured to the Wild West this season with a womenswear collection flush with cowboy references. Grommets, leather laces and cotton eyelets were just some of the details that came together to give ensembles a rebellious, self-assured appeal. The prairie inspiration, which was apparent from the layering of leather vests, moto jackets, square-necked silk tops and chic mini-skirts, was reinforced by studded ankle boots and tousled French braids. Of course, no Diesel show would be complete without denim. This season's offerings were dished out in distressed pastels, and printed with a snakeskin-like tie-dye.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Diesel Black Gold

The tough-as-nails, rock ‘n' roll spirit of Diesel Black Gold ventured to the Wild West this season with a womenswear collection flush with cowboy references. Grommets, leather laces and cotton eyelets were just some of the details that came together to give ensembles a rebellious, self-assured appeal. The prairie inspiration, which was apparent from the layering of leather vests, moto jackets, square-necked silk tops and chic mini-skirts, was reinforced by studded ankle boots and tousled French braids. Of course, no Diesel show would be complete without denim. This season's offerings were dished out in distressed pastels, and printed with a snakeskin-like tie-dye.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs likes to keep things simple at his diffusion line Marc by Marc Jacobs. To that end, this season’s retro theme - sneakers and sequins - worked like a charm. The American designer offered up the classic Stan Smith trainer in all manner of extravagant materials, from copper-painted python skin to metallic gold leather. The flashy footwear was the perfect accessory to complement his easygoing, low-key clothes. The louche trouser in particular had a major outing this season, served up with matching blouses and jackets or delivered in the form of a one-piece jumpsuit cut from silk. With their sporty, clean silhouettes, the ensembles looked vaguely like supercharged tracksuits, which suited us just fine.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs likes to keep things simple at his diffusion line Marc by Marc Jacobs. To that end, this season’s retro theme - sneakers and sequins - worked like a charm. The American designer offered up the classic Stan Smith trainer in all manner of extravagant materials, from copper-painted python skin to metallic gold leather. The flashy footwear was the perfect accessory to complement his easygoing, low-key clothes. The louche trouser in particular had a major outing this season, served up with matching blouses and jackets or delivered in the form of a one-piece jumpsuit cut from silk. With their sporty, clean silhouettes, the ensembles looked vaguely like supercharged tracksuits, which suited us just fine.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs likes to keep things simple at his diffusion line Marc by Marc Jacobs. To that end, this season’s retro theme - sneakers and sequins - worked like a charm. The American designer offered up the classic Stan Smith trainer in all manner of extravagant materials, from copper-painted python skin to metallic gold leather. The flashy footwear was the perfect accessory to complement his easygoing, low-key clothes. The louche trouser in particular had a major outing this season, served up with matching blouses and jackets or delivered in the form of a one-piece jumpsuit cut from silk. With their sporty, clean silhouettes, the ensembles looked vaguely like supercharged tracksuits, which suited us just fine.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs likes to keep things simple at his diffusion line Marc by Marc Jacobs. To that end, this season’s retro theme - sneakers and sequins - worked like a charm. The American designer offered up the classic Stan Smith trainer in all manner of extravagant materials, from copper-painted python skin to metallic gold leather. The flashy footwear was the perfect accessory to complement his easygoing, low-key clothes. The louche trouser in particular had a major outing this season, served up with matching blouses and jackets or delivered in the form of a one-piece jumpsuit cut from silk. With their sporty, clean silhouettes, the ensembles looked vaguely like supercharged tracksuits, which suited us just fine.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs likes to keep things simple at his diffusion line Marc by Marc Jacobs. To that end, this season’s retro theme - sneakers and sequins - worked like a charm. The American designer offered up the classic Stan Smith trainer in all manner of extravagant materials, from copper-painted python skin to metallic gold leather. The flashy footwear was the perfect accessory to complement his easygoing, low-key clothes. The louche trouser in particular had a major outing this season, served up with matching blouses and jackets or delivered in the form of a one-piece jumpsuit cut from silk. With their sporty, clean silhouettes, the ensembles looked vaguely like supercharged tracksuits, which suited us just fine.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Narciso Rodriguez

The New York designer’s take on classic femininity was charged with a modern twist this season, as he embraced texture and embellishment in addition to his trademark minimalism. Narciso Rodriguez kicked off his show with beautifully executed swing jackets, which were dressed up with laminated inserts for added oomph. His signature sculptural silhouette was then literally broken up, with shift shapes split into tops and skirts with a midriff showing in between. The sophisticated, subtle breaks in structural pieces were further underscored by the designer's expert use of jacquard, sheer panels, cutout details and foil-printed fabrics to add a futuristic dimension. Although pieces were predominantly tailored and controlled in shape, Rodriguez added the odd floating train and sleeve to provide a delicate balance. Jewel tones like rose, copper and citrine, added further lustre to the confident collection.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Narciso Rodriguez

The New York designer’s take on classic femininity was charged with a modern twist this season, as he embraced texture and embellishment in addition to his trademark minimalism. Narciso Rodriguez kicked off his show with beautifully executed swing jackets, which were dressed up with laminated inserts for added oomph. His signature sculptural silhouette was then literally broken up, with shift shapes split into tops and skirts with a midriff showing in between. The sophisticated, subtle breaks in structural pieces were further underscored by the designer's expert use of jacquard, sheer panels, cutout details and foil-printed fabrics to add a futuristic dimension. Although pieces were predominantly tailored and controlled in shape, Rodriguez added the odd floating train and sleeve to provide a delicate balance. Jewel tones like rose, copper and citrine, added further lustre to the confident collection.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Narciso Rodriguez

The New York designer’s take on classic femininity was charged with a modern twist this season, as he embraced texture and embellishment in addition to his trademark minimalism. Narciso Rodriguez kicked off his show with beautifully executed swing jackets, which were dressed up with laminated inserts for added oomph. His signature sculptural silhouette was then literally broken up, with shift shapes split into tops and skirts with a midriff showing in between. The sophisticated, subtle breaks in structural pieces were further underscored by the designer's expert use of jacquard, sheer panels, cutout details and foil-printed fabrics to add a futuristic dimension. Although pieces were predominantly tailored and controlled in shape, Rodriguez added the odd floating train and sleeve to provide a delicate balance. Jewel tones like rose, copper and citrine, added further lustre to the confident collection.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Narciso Rodriguez

The New York designer’s take on classic femininity was charged with a modern twist this season, as he embraced texture and embellishment in addition to his trademark minimalism. Narciso Rodriguez kicked off his show with beautifully executed swing jackets, which were dressed up with laminated inserts for added oomph. His signature sculptural silhouette was then literally broken up, with shift shapes split into tops and skirts with a midriff showing in between. The sophisticated, subtle breaks in structural pieces were further underscored by the designer's expert use of jacquard, sheer panels, cutout details and foil-printed fabrics to add a futuristic dimension. Although pieces were predominantly tailored and controlled in shape, Rodriguez added the odd floating train and sleeve to provide a delicate balance. Jewel tones like rose, copper and citrine, added further lustre to the confident collection.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Narciso Rodriguez

The New York designer’s take on classic femininity was charged with a modern twist this season, as he embraced texture and embellishment in addition to his trademark minimalism. Narciso Rodriguez kicked off his show with beautifully executed swing jackets, which were dressed up with laminated inserts for added oomph. His signature sculptural silhouette was then literally broken up, with shift shapes split into tops and skirts with a midriff showing in between. The sophisticated, subtle breaks in structural pieces were further underscored by the designer's expert use of jacquard, sheer panels, cutout details and foil-printed fabrics to add a futuristic dimension. Although pieces were predominantly tailored and controlled in shape, Rodriguez added the odd floating train and sleeve to provide a delicate balance. Jewel tones like rose, copper and citrine, added further lustre to the confident collection.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Michael Kors

Michael Kors name checked Katherine Hepburn and Lauren Hutton for his Spring show. The two style icons may have reigned over different eras in fashion, but both are inextricably linked. For Kors, they summed up the relaxed, boyish charm present in his classic sportswear pieces. The wide-leg, high waisted trouser - a signature silhouette in both the 1940s and 1970s - was the key staple of the collection. Paired with silk shirts, trenches and tailored jackets in contrasting tones, Kors presented a convincing case for sophisticated separates. But the collection was also populated with girlish numbers, such as the ultra-feminine circle skirts and retro two-piece swimwear, which worked simultaneously as midriff-baring halter-tops. Normally the master of minimal, it was refreshing to see Kors dip into something more romantic, especially when that meant florals and guipure lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors name checked Katherine Hepburn and Lauren Hutton for his Spring show. The two style icons may have reigned over different eras in fashion, but both are inextricably linked. For Kors, they summed up the relaxed, boyish charm present in his classic sportswear pieces. The wide-leg, high waisted trouser - a signature silhouette in both the 1940s and 1970s - was the key staple of the collection. Paired with silk shirts, trenches and tailored jackets in contrasting tones, Kors presented a convincing case for sophisticated separates. But the collection was also populated with girlish numbers, such as the ultra-feminine circle skirts and retro two-piece swimwear, which worked simultaneously as midriff-baring halter-tops. Normally the master of minimal, it was refreshing to see Kors dip into something more romantic, especially when that meant florals and guipure lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors name checked Katherine Hepburn and Lauren Hutton for his Spring show. The two style icons may have reigned over different eras in fashion, but both are inextricably linked. For Kors, they summed up the relaxed, boyish charm present in his classic sportswear pieces. The wide-leg, high waisted trouser - a signature silhouette in both the 1940s and 1970s - was the key staple of the collection. Paired with silk shirts, trenches and tailored jackets in contrasting tones, Kors presented a convincing case for sophisticated separates. But the collection was also populated with girlish numbers, such as the ultra-feminine circle skirts and retro two-piece swimwear, which worked simultaneously as midriff-baring halter-tops. Normally the master of minimal, it was refreshing to see Kors dip into something more romantic, especially when that meant florals and guipure lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors name checked Katherine Hepburn and Lauren Hutton for his Spring show. The two style icons may have reigned over different eras in fashion, but both are inextricably linked. For Kors, they summed up the relaxed, boyish charm present in his classic sportswear pieces. The wide-leg, high waisted trouser - a signature silhouette in both the 1940s and 1970s - was the key staple of the collection. Paired with silk shirts, trenches and tailored jackets in contrasting tones, Kors presented a convincing case for sophisticated separates. But the collection was also populated with girlish numbers, such as the ultra-feminine circle skirts and retro two-piece swimwear, which worked simultaneously as midriff-baring halter-tops. Normally the master of minimal, it was refreshing to see Kors dip into something more romantic, especially when that meant florals and guipure lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Michael Kors

Michael Kors name checked Katherine Hepburn and Lauren Hutton for his Spring show. The two style icons may have reigned over different eras in fashion, but both are inextricably linked. For Kors, they summed up the relaxed, boyish charm present in his classic sportswear pieces. The wide-leg, high waisted trouser - a signature silhouette in both the 1940s and 1970s - was the key staple of the collection. Paired with silk shirts, trenches and tailored jackets in contrasting tones, Kors presented a convincing case for sophisticated separates. But the collection was also populated with girlish numbers, such as the ultra-feminine circle skirts and retro two-piece swimwear, which worked simultaneously as midriff-baring halter-tops. Normally the master of minimal, it was refreshing to see Kors dip into something more romantic, especially when that meant florals and guipure lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Proenza Schouler

A lofty office building under construction in Midtown formed the striking backdrop to Proenza Schouler's Spring offering. Rather than opt for the soft, sheer materials that have floated down most of New York’s runways this season, designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez managed to bring substance and crispness to their collection without weighing it down. The key shapes - long and lean - were articulated in flattering wide-leg culottes, leisurely skirts, and layered dresses in a slew of multi-coloured metallic knife pleats. The design duo's forte has always been their manipulation of fabric, but the tricks were played down this season as ultra-luxe materials like tissue-thin suede in warm, summer shades took a leading role. Still, texture did arise in the form of cotton crepe tree prints, roller paint graphics, and metallic knits. Intriguing accessories continued to emerge during the show, from the gold metal plate buckles that pinned down the lapels of cropped jackets, to the oversized copper jewellery and, best of all, the towering stacked-heel sandals in wood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Proenza Schouler

A lofty office building under construction in Midtown formed the striking backdrop to Proenza Schouler's Spring offering. Rather than opt for the soft, sheer materials that have floated down most of New York’s runways this season, designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez managed to bring substance and crispness to their collection without weighing it down. The key shapes - long and lean - were articulated in flattering wide-leg culottes, leisurely skirts, and layered dresses in a slew of multi-coloured metallic knife pleats. The design duo's forte has always been their manipulation of fabric, but the tricks were played down this season as ultra-luxe materials like tissue-thin suede in warm, summer shades took a leading role. Still, texture did arise in the form of cotton crepe tree prints, roller paint graphics, and metallic knits. Intriguing accessories continued to emerge during the show, from the gold metal plate buckles that pinned down the lapels of cropped jackets, to the oversized copper jewellery and, best of all, the towering stacked-heel sandals in wood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Proenza Schouler

A lofty office building under construction in Midtown formed the striking backdrop to Proenza Schouler's Spring offering. Rather than opt for the soft, sheer materials that have floated down most of New York’s runways this season, designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez managed to bring substance and crispness to their collection without weighing it down. The key shapes - long and lean - were articulated in flattering wide-leg culottes, leisurely skirts, and layered dresses in a slew of multi-coloured metallic knife pleats. The design duo's forte has always been their manipulation of fabric, but the tricks were played down this season as ultra-luxe materials like tissue-thin suede in warm, summer shades took a leading role. Still, texture did arise in the form of cotton crepe tree prints, roller paint graphics, and metallic knits. Intriguing accessories continued to emerge during the show, from the gold metal plate buckles that pinned down the lapels of cropped jackets, to the oversized copper jewellery and, best of all, the towering stacked-heel sandals in wood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Proenza Schouler

A lofty office building under construction in Midtown formed the striking backdrop to Proenza Schouler's Spring offering. Rather than opt for the soft, sheer materials that have floated down most of New York’s runways this season, designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez managed to bring substance and crispness to their collection without weighing it down. The key shapes - long and lean - were articulated in flattering wide-leg culottes, leisurely skirts, and layered dresses in a slew of multi-coloured metallic knife pleats. The design duo's forte has always been their manipulation of fabric, but the tricks were played down this season as ultra-luxe materials like tissue-thin suede in warm, summer shades took a leading role. Still, texture did arise in the form of cotton crepe tree prints, roller paint graphics, and metallic knits. Intriguing accessories continued to emerge during the show, from the gold metal plate buckles that pinned down the lapels of cropped jackets, to the oversized copper jewellery and, best of all, the towering stacked-heel sandals in wood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Proenza Schouler

A lofty office building under construction in Midtown formed the striking backdrop to Proenza Schouler's Spring offering. Rather than opt for the soft, sheer materials that have floated down most of New York’s runways this season, designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez managed to bring substance and crispness to their collection without weighing it down. The key shapes - long and lean - were articulated in flattering wide-leg culottes, leisurely skirts, and layered dresses in a slew of multi-coloured metallic knife pleats. The design duo's forte has always been their manipulation of fabric, but the tricks were played down this season as ultra-luxe materials like tissue-thin suede in warm, summer shades took a leading role. Still, texture did arise in the form of cotton crepe tree prints, roller paint graphics, and metallic knits. Intriguing accessories continued to emerge during the show, from the gold metal plate buckles that pinned down the lapels of cropped jackets, to the oversized copper jewellery and, best of all, the towering stacked-heel sandals in wood.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Reed Krakoff

Reed Krakoff's presentation was the epitome of chic with a demure collection that juxtaposed boundless amounts of fluid fabrics with sophisticated tailoring, all in a delicate palette of nudes. As gossamer-like dresses and translucent blouse tops breezed down the runway, Krakoff kept things from going too soft by injecting sportswear details, like cotton waistbands to shirts and rounded-collars to runner-style jackets. It was this contrast that eloquently exuded the crisp, wearable luxury that the designer has become known for. Simple t-shirts and v-neck tops were made all the more desirable in sensual silk chiffon. Another delightful element was the interplay of sheer and opaque fabrics, often in different colours and finishes - like matt nude with shiny lemon - that lent a subtle, graphic quality to the simple silhouettes. Ultimately though, it was the dresses that stole the day. Boasting thin elegant shoulder straps, ruched bodices and elegant swallowtail hems, they had a seductive, barely-there quality that few could resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Reed Krakoff

Reed Krakoff's presentation was the epitome of chic with a demure collection that juxtaposed boundless amounts of fluid fabrics with sophisticated tailoring, all in a delicate palette of nudes. As gossamer-like dresses and translucent blouse tops breezed down the runway, Krakoff kept things from going too soft by injecting sportswear details, like cotton waistbands to shirts and rounded-collars to runner-style jackets. It was this contrast that eloquently exuded the crisp, wearable luxury that the designer has become known for. Simple t-shirts and v-neck tops were made all the more desirable in sensual silk chiffon. Another delightful element was the interplay of sheer and opaque fabrics, often in different colours and finishes - like matt nude with shiny lemon - that lent a subtle, graphic quality to the simple silhouettes. Ultimately though, it was the dresses that stole the day. Boasting thin elegant shoulder straps, ruched bodices and elegant swallowtail hems, they had a seductive, barely-there quality that few could resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Reed Krakoff

Reed Krakoff's presentation was the epitome of chic with a demure collection that juxtaposed boundless amounts of fluid fabrics with sophisticated tailoring, all in a delicate palette of nudes. As gossamer-like dresses and translucent blouse tops breezed down the runway, Krakoff kept things from going too soft by injecting sportswear details, like cotton waistbands to shirts and rounded-collars to runner-style jackets. It was this contrast that eloquently exuded the crisp, wearable luxury that the designer has become known for. Simple t-shirts and v-neck tops were made all the more desirable in sensual silk chiffon. Another delightful element was the interplay of sheer and opaque fabrics, often in different colours and finishes - like matt nude with shiny lemon - that lent a subtle, graphic quality to the simple silhouettes. Ultimately though, it was the dresses that stole the day. Boasting thin elegant shoulder straps, ruched bodices and elegant swallowtail hems, they had a seductive, barely-there quality that few could resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Reed Krakoff

Reed Krakoff's presentation was the epitome of chic with a demure collection that juxtaposed boundless amounts of fluid fabrics with sophisticated tailoring, all in a delicate palette of nudes. As gossamer-like dresses and translucent blouse tops breezed down the runway, Krakoff kept things from going too soft by injecting sportswear details, like cotton waistbands to shirts and rounded-collars to runner-style jackets. It was this contrast that eloquently exuded the crisp, wearable luxury that the designer has become known for. Simple t-shirts and v-neck tops were made all the more desirable in sensual silk chiffon. Another delightful element was the interplay of sheer and opaque fabrics, often in different colours and finishes - like matt nude with shiny lemon - that lent a subtle, graphic quality to the simple silhouettes. Ultimately though, it was the dresses that stole the day. Boasting thin elegant shoulder straps, ruched bodices and elegant swallowtail hems, they had a seductive, barely-there quality that few could resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Reed Krakoff

Reed Krakoff's presentation was the epitome of chic with a demure collection that juxtaposed boundless amounts of fluid fabrics with sophisticated tailoring, all in a delicate palette of nudes. As gossamer-like dresses and translucent blouse tops breezed down the runway, Krakoff kept things from going too soft by injecting sportswear details, like cotton waistbands to shirts and rounded-collars to runner-style jackets. It was this contrast that eloquently exuded the crisp, wearable luxury that the designer has become known for. Simple t-shirts and v-neck tops were made all the more desirable in sensual silk chiffon. Another delightful element was the interplay of sheer and opaque fabrics, often in different colours and finishes - like matt nude with shiny lemon - that lent a subtle, graphic quality to the simple silhouettes. Ultimately though, it was the dresses that stole the day. Boasting thin elegant shoulder straps, ruched bodices and elegant swallowtail hems, they had a seductive, barely-there quality that few could resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Osklen

Osklen translated its fun-loving Brazilian heritage into a playful collection that saw bright jewels tones take centre stage. The show opened with a series of punchy numbers, with models dressed in ruby red, citrine and emerald green from head-to-toe. ‘I was thinking a lot about the colour of gemstones for spring. About their brilliance and their transparency,’ said Oskar Metsavaht. Each look emerged with a little surprise. Straightforward tunic tops revealed plenty of skin from behind, with zips hanging open provocatively. Sheer chiffon tops featured angular, facet-like detailing. Printed pieces, emblazoned with multicoloured stripes and kaleidoscopic gem formations, were cleverly layered on top of one another to form a pastiche of different shapes and patterns, that echoed the different cuts of gemstones themselves.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Osklen

Osklen translated its fun-loving Brazilian heritage into a playful collection that saw bright jewels tones take centre stage. The show opened with a series of punchy numbers, with models dressed in ruby red, citrine and emerald green from head-to-toe. ‘I was thinking a lot about the colour of gemstones for spring. About their brilliance and their transparency,’ said Oskar Metsavaht. Each look emerged with a little surprise. Straightforward tunic tops revealed plenty of skin from behind, with zips hanging open provocatively. Sheer chiffon tops featured angular, facet-like detailing. Printed pieces, emblazoned with multicoloured stripes and kaleidoscopic gem formations, were cleverly layered on top of one another to form a pastiche of different shapes and patterns, that echoed the different cuts of gemstones themselves.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Osklen

Osklen translated its fun-loving Brazilian heritage into a playful collection that saw bright jewels tones take centre stage. The show opened with a series of punchy numbers, with models dressed in ruby red, citrine and emerald green from head-to-toe. ‘I was thinking a lot about the colour of gemstones for spring. About their brilliance and their transparency,’ said Oskar Metsavaht. Each look emerged with a little surprise. Straightforward tunic tops revealed plenty of skin from behind, with zips hanging open provocatively. Sheer chiffon tops featured angular, facet-like detailing. Printed pieces, emblazoned with multicoloured stripes and kaleidoscopic gem formations, were cleverly layered on top of one another to form a pastiche of different shapes and patterns, that echoed the different cuts of gemstones themselves.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Osklen

Osklen translated its fun-loving Brazilian heritage into a playful collection that saw bright jewels tones take centre stage. The show opened with a series of punchy numbers, with models dressed in ruby red, citrine and emerald green from head-to-toe. ‘I was thinking a lot about the colour of gemstones for spring. About their brilliance and their transparency,’ said Oskar Metsavaht. Each look emerged with a little surprise. Straightforward tunic tops revealed plenty of skin from behind, with zips hanging open provocatively. Sheer chiffon tops featured angular, facet-like detailing. Printed pieces, emblazoned with multicoloured stripes and kaleidoscopic gem formations, were cleverly layered on top of one another to form a pastiche of different shapes and patterns, that echoed the different cuts of gemstones themselves.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Osklen

Osklen translated its fun-loving Brazilian heritage into a playful collection that saw bright jewels tones take centre stage. The show opened with a series of punchy numbers, with models dressed in ruby red, citrine and emerald green from head-to-toe. ‘I was thinking a lot about the colour of gemstones for spring. About their brilliance and their transparency,’ said Oskar Metsavaht. Each look emerged with a little surprise. Straightforward tunic tops revealed plenty of skin from behind, with zips hanging open provocatively. Sheer chiffon tops featured angular, facet-like detailing. Printed pieces, emblazoned with multicoloured stripes and kaleidoscopic gem formations, were cleverly layered on top of one another to form a pastiche of different shapes and patterns, that echoed the different cuts of gemstones themselves.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh

Calvin Klein Collection

Here at Wallpaper*, it probably goes without saying that we are suckers for fashion designers that infuse architectonic silhouettes into their collections. Francisco Costa (also somewhat of a furniture design buff) never fails to deliver on this count. This season, which marks his 10th anniversary as creative director at Calvin Klein Collection, saw the designer kick it up a notch with roughened materials that had the weight and texture akin to upholstery fabrics. Boxy tops, for example, looked like modernist building facades with the sheer panels filling in for vertical glass windows, while cuffed canvas pants resembled chiseled skyscrapers. There was no quibbling over details. Instead, considered lines drew the eye across the body and below the knee, where Costa lopped off a flared wrap skirt. His crafty manipulation of fabrics also added to the visual intrigue. Strips of black mesh and white snakeskin were woven together on halter top dresses, while silk fringe was sheared in dramatic tuffs, creating a fresh decorative effect on monochromatic dresses. His canvas material, meanwhile, had the rich texture of woven jute or hemp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Here at Wallpaper*, it probably goes without saying that we are suckers for fashion designers that infuse architectonic silhouettes into their collections. Francisco Costa (also somewhat of a furniture design buff) never fails to deliver on this count. This season, which marks his 10th anniversary as creative director at Calvin Klein Collection, saw the designer kick it up a notch with roughened materials that had the weight and texture akin to upholstery fabrics. Boxy tops, for example, looked like modernist building facades with the sheer panels filling in for vertical glass windows, while cuffed canvas pants resembled chiseled skyscrapers. There was no quibbling over details. Instead, considered lines drew the eye across the body and below the knee, where Costa lopped off a flared wrap skirt. His crafty manipulation of fabrics also added to the visual intrigue. Strips of black mesh and white snakeskin were woven together on halter top dresses, while silk fringe was sheared in dramatic tuffs, creating a fresh decorative effect on monochromatic dresses. His canvas material, meanwhile, had the rich texture of woven jute or hemp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Here at Wallpaper*, it probably goes without saying that we are suckers for fashion designers that infuse architectonic silhouettes into their collections. Francisco Costa (also somewhat of a furniture design buff) never fails to deliver on this count. This season, which marks his 10th anniversary as creative director at Calvin Klein Collection, saw the designer kick it up a notch with roughened materials that had the weight and texture akin to upholstery fabrics. Boxy tops, for example, looked like modernist building facades with the sheer panels filling in for vertical glass windows, while cuffed canvas pants resembled chiseled skyscrapers. There was no quibbling over details. Instead, considered lines drew the eye across the body and below the knee, where Costa lopped off a flared wrap skirt. His crafty manipulation of fabrics also added to the visual intrigue. Strips of black mesh and white snakeskin were woven together on halter top dresses, while silk fringe was sheared in dramatic tuffs, creating a fresh decorative effect on monochromatic dresses. His canvas material, meanwhile, had the rich texture of woven jute or hemp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Calvin Klein Collections

Here at Wallpaper*, it probably goes without saying that we are suckers for fashion designers that infuse architectonic silhouettes into their collections. Francisco Costa (also somewhat of a furniture design buff) never fails to deliver on this count. This season, which marks his 10th anniversary as creative director at Calvin Klein Collections, saw the designer kick it up a notch with roughened materials that had the weight and texture akin to upholstery fabrics. Boxy tops, for example, looked like modernist building facades with the sheer panels filling

Calvin Klein Collection

Here at Wallpaper*, it probably goes without saying that we are suckers for fashion designers that infuse architectonic silhouettes into their collections. Francisco Costa (also somewhat of a furniture design buff) never fails to deliver on this count. This season, which marks his 10th anniversary as creative director at Calvin Klein Collection, saw the designer kick it up a notch with roughened materials that had the weight and texture akin to upholstery fabrics. Boxy tops, for example, looked like modernist building facades with the sheer panels filling in for vertical glass windows, while cuffed canvas pants resembled chiseled skyscrapers. There was no quibbling over details. Instead, considered lines drew the eye across the body and below the knee, where Costa lopped off a flared wrap skirt. His crafty manipulation of fabrics also added to the visual intrigue. Strips of black mesh and white snakeskin were woven together on halter top dresses, while silk fringe was sheared in dramatic tuffs, creating a fresh decorative effect on monochromatic dresses. His canvas material, meanwhile, had the rich texture of woven jute or hemp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

in for vertical glass windows, while cuffed canvas pants resembled chiseled skyscrapers. There was no quibbling over details. Instead, considered lines drew the eye across the body and below the knee, where Costa lopped off a flared wrap skirt. His crafty manipulation of fabrics also added to the visual intrigue. Strips of black mesh and white snakeskin were woven together on halter top dresses, while silk fringe was sheared in dramatic tuffs, creating a fresh decorative effect on monochromatic dresses. His canvas material, meanwhile, had the rich texture of woven jute or hemp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

Here at Wallpaper*, it probably goes without saying that we are suckers for fashion designers that infuse architectonic silhouettes into their collections. Francisco Costa (also somewhat of a furniture design buff) never fails to deliver on this count. This season, which marks his 10th anniversary as creative director at Calvin Klein Collection, saw the designer kick it up a notch with roughened materials that had the weight and texture akin to upholstery fabrics. Boxy tops, for example, looked like modernist building facades with the sheer panels filling in for vertical glass windows, while cuffed canvas pants resembled chiseled skyscrapers. There was no quibbling over details. Instead, considered lines drew the eye across the body and below the knee, where Costa lopped off a flared wrap skirt. His crafty manipulation of fabrics also added to the visual intrigue. Strips of black mesh and white snakeskin were woven together on halter top dresses, while silk fringe was sheared in dramatic tuffs, creating a fresh decorative effect on monochromatic dresses. His canvas material, meanwhile, had the rich texture of woven jute or hemp.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren has always loved the buttoned-up sophistication of patrician style, but this season the American fashion giant transported his women from their lofty English manors and onto the streets of London. The moment was the mod-tinged 1960s - new territory for the designer, but one that gave his clothes a fresh graphic quality and pared down edge. Silhouettes were simple but strong: low-rise boot cut trousers; flared miniskirts; cropped jackets and shiny trench coats. Lauren wisely resisted the tempting clichés of this era - most notably the go-go boot and psychedelic print - and instead made a convincing case for black knee socks worn with block-heeled pumps. The first looks paraded down the runway in strict black and white, but later exploded into a juicy rainbow of solid brights. Again, the American showed his flair for uncomplicated elegance - most especially on those floor grazing organza gowns cut in the most sumptuous of neon hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren has always loved the buttoned-up sophistication of patrician style, but this season the American fashion giant transported his women from their lofty English manors and onto the streets of London. The moment was the mod-tinged 1960s - new territory for the designer, but one that gave his clothes a fresh graphic quality and pared down edge. Silhouettes were simple but strong: low-rise boot cut trousers; flared miniskirts; cropped jackets and shiny trench coats. Lauren wisely resisted the tempting clichés of this era - most notably the go-go boot and psychedelic print - and instead made a convincing case for black knee socks worn with block-heeled pumps. The first looks paraded down the runway in strict black and white, but later exploded into a juicy rainbow of solid brights. Again, the American showed his flair for uncomplicated elegance - most especially on those floor grazing organza gowns cut in the most sumptuous of neon hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren has always loved the buttoned-up sophistication of patrician style, but this season the American fashion giant transported his women from their lofty English manors and onto the streets of London. The moment was the mod-tinged 1960s - new territory for the designer, but one that gave his clothes a fresh graphic quality and pared down edge. Silhouettes were simple but strong: low-rise boot cut trousers; flared miniskirts; cropped jackets and shiny trench coats. Lauren wisely resisted the tempting clichés of this era - most notably the go-go boot and psychedelic print - and instead made a convincing case for black knee socks worn with block-heeled pumps. The first looks paraded down the runway in strict black and white, but later exploded into a juicy rainbow of solid brights. Again, the American showed his flair for uncomplicated elegance - most especially on those floor grazing organza gowns cut in the most sumptuous of neon hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren has always loved the buttoned-up sophistication of patrician style, but this season the American fashion giant transported his women from their lofty English manors and onto the streets of London. The moment was the mod-tinged 1960s - new territory for the designer, but one that gave his clothes a fresh graphic quality and pared down edge. Silhouettes were simple but strong: low-rise boot cut trousers; flared miniskirts; cropped jackets and shiny trench coats. Lauren wisely resisted the tempting clichés of this era - most notably the go-go boot and psychedelic print - and instead made a convincing case for black knee socks worn with block-heeled pumps. The first looks paraded down the runway in strict black and white, but later exploded into a juicy rainbow of solid brights. Again, the American showed his flair for uncomplicated elegance - most especially on those floor grazing organza gowns cut in the most sumptuous of neon hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren has always loved the buttoned-up sophistication of patrician style, but this season the American fashion giant transported his women from their lofty English manors and onto the streets of London. The moment was the mod-tinged 1960s - new territory for the designer, but one that gave his clothes a fresh graphic quality and pared down edge. Silhouettes were simple but strong: low-rise boot cut trousers; flared miniskirts; cropped jackets and shiny trench coats. Lauren wisely resisted the tempting clichés of this era - most notably the go-go boot and psychedelic print - and instead made a convincing case for black knee socks worn with block-heeled pumps. The first looks paraded down the runway in strict black and white, but later exploded into a juicy rainbow of solid brights. Again, the American showed his flair for uncomplicated elegance - most especially on those floor grazing organza gowns cut in the most sumptuous of neon hues.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marc Jacobs
 
There will be no daisies for Marc Jacobs come springtime. No skipping in the sunshine, no joyous moods, no fresh faces, and certainly no Easter pastel pinks whatsoever. Jacobs envisions a cold, wintery darkness for next year: somber women in long, haunting gowns. The newfound moodiness could be perceived instantaneously inside New York's Armory, where Jacobs installed a post-apocalyptic set of wind-swept sand, twisting boardwalks and up-turned boats. The music was menacing; the heat likewise unbearable. The models' hair was cut into choppy bobs. But despite the somber surroundings, the clothes shone with an enigmatic glow. Midnight florals bloomed through solemn lace and embroidery. Military jackets and boyish Bermudas came wrapped in black velvet braiding, while the dresses trailed behind the models with a fragile Victorian hauteur. Jacobs mixed up his sober fare with touches of wit, like a Coca Cola wave symbol sans wording, and his whimsical footwear that included moccasins and bedazzled Teva-like sandals. Now that's something we can all skip home in the summer with.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Marc Jacobs
 
There will be no daisies for Marc Jacobs come springtime. No skipping in the sunshine, no joyous moods, no fresh faces, and certainly no Easter pastel pinks whatsoever. Jacobs envisions a cold, wintery darkness for next year: somber women in long, haunting gowns. The newfound moodiness could be perceived instantaneously inside New York's Armory, where Jacobs installed a post-apocalyptic set of wind-swept sand, twisting boardwalks and up-turned boats. The music was menacing; the heat likewise unbearable. The models' hair was cut into choppy bobs. But despite the somber surroundings, the clothes shone with an enigmatic glow. Midnight florals bloomed through solemn lace and embroidery. Military jackets and boyish Bermudas came wrapped in black velvet braiding, while the dresses trailed behind the models with a fragile Victorian hauteur. Jacobs mixed up his sober fare with touches of wit, like a Coca Cola wave symbol sans wording, and his whimsical footwear that included moccasins and bedazzled Teva-like sandals. Now that's something we can all skip home in the summer with.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Marc Jacobs
 
There will be no daisies for Marc Jacobs come springtime. No skipping in the sunshine, no joyous moods, no fresh faces, and certainly no Easter pastel pinks whatsoever. Jacobs envisions a cold, wintery darkness for next year: somber women in long, haunting gowns. The newfound moodiness could be perceived instantaneously inside New York's Armory, where Jacobs installed a post-apocalyptic set of wind-swept sand, twisting boardwalks and up-turned boats. The music was menacing; the heat likewise unbearable. The models' hair was cut into choppy bobs. But despite the somber surroundings, the clothes shone with an enigmatic glow. Midnight florals bloomed through solemn lace and embroidery. Military jackets and boyish Bermudas came wrapped in black velvet braiding, while the dresses trailed behind the models with a fragile Victorian hauteur. Jacobs mixed up his sober fare with touches of wit, like a Coca Cola wave symbol sans wording, and his whimsical footwear that included moccasins and bedazzled Teva-like sandals. Now that's something we can all skip home in the summer with.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Marc Jacobs
 
There will be no daisies for Marc Jacobs come springtime. No skipping in the sunshine, no joyous moods, no fresh faces, and certainly no Easter pastel pinks whatsoever. Jacobs envisions a cold, wintery darkness for next year: somber women in long, haunting gowns. The newfound moodiness could be perceived instantaneously inside New York's Armory, where Jacobs installed a post-apocalyptic set of wind-swept sand, twisting boardwalks and up-turned boats. The music was menacing; the heat likewise unbearable. The models' hair was cut into choppy bobs. But despite the somber surroundings, the clothes shone with an enigmatic glow. Midnight florals bloomed through solemn lace and embroidery. Military jackets and boyish Bermudas came wrapped in black velvet braiding, while the dresses trailed behind the models with a fragile Victorian hauteur. Jacobs mixed up his sober fare with touches of wit, like a Coca Cola wave symbol sans wording, and his whimsical footwear that included moccasins and bedazzled Teva-like sandals. Now that's something we can all skip home in the summer with.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Marc Jacobs
 
There will be no daisies for Marc Jacobs come springtime. No skipping in the sunshine, no joyous moods, no fresh faces, and certainly no Easter pastel pinks whatsoever. Jacobs envisions a cold, wintery darkness for next year: somber women in long, haunting gowns. The newfound moodiness could be perceived instantaneously inside New York's Armory, where Jacobs installed a post-apocalyptic set of wind-swept sand, twisting boardwalks and up-turned boats. The music was menacing; the heat likewise unbearable. The models' hair was cut into choppy bobs. But despite the somber surroundings, the clothes shone with an enigmatic glow. Midnight florals bloomed through solemn lace and embroidery. Military jackets and boyish Bermudas came wrapped in black velvet braiding, while the dresses trailed behind the models with a fragile Victorian hauteur. Jacobs mixed up his sober fare with touches of wit, like a Coca Cola wave symbol sans wording, and his whimsical footwear that included moccasins and bedazzled Teva-like sandals. Now that's something we can all skip home in the summer with.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Rag & Bone

Rag & Bone's signature cool received a 1990s remix this season. Minimalism reigned supreme, with models donning slip dresses, tailored overalls and box-pleat skirts in an equally restrained palette of blush, nude and white. All the mainstays of nineties pop culture got a look in. From thin-strapped halter-neck crop tops to overlaid knee-length chiffon skirts, the collection had a Calvin Klein feel to it. Designers David Neville and Marcus Wainwright elegantly infused the sportier pieces with hits of glamour, like languid track pants in shimmering, gauzy Lurex and buttoned-up polo Ts in black or turquoise chiffon. The pair's trademark details rippled quietly through: crinkled fabrics, shirttail hems and chunky lace-up wedges - finished off with semi-dried hair and a bright Geisha lip. The covetable insouciance was impossible to resist.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Pei-Ru Keh


Twitter feed

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired

  • twitter-blank

    This Twitter feed has now expired



Past shows


Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Google Plus Follow us on Tumblr