Jil Sander

Last season, Jil Sander introduced a wide-leg Bermuda short as the new essential bottom half in her reductive menswear wardrobe. Now that the rest of the fashion world has followed her lead, the designer has cut her short even longer and wider - so much so that it now appears like a pleated culotte or even a woman’s A-line skirt. But Sander avoids the pitfalls of dressing men too much like women with her knife-sharp cutting. Boxy button-down shirts came with scalpel-like collars, rectangular jackets were cut with a slight curved back and three-quarter-length coats were so dense they looked like they were sculpted from stone. The blouson jacket - a hybrid shirt-jacket with an elastic waist – is another Sander signature that is quickly gaining traction in the rest of the world’s trend radar. Sander washed hers with new borders of neon watermelon or tangerine—a splash of colour that quickly grew to a full pool of hue on her extra-wide Bermuda short suits.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Last season, Jil Sander introduced a wide-leg Bermuda short as the new essential bottom half in her reductive menswear wardrobe. Now that the rest of the fashion world has followed her lead, the designer has cut her short even longer and wider - so much so that it now appears like a pleated culotte or even a woman’s A-line skirt. But Sander avoids the pitfalls of dressing men too much like women with her knife-sharp cutting. Boxy button-down shirts came with scalpel-like collars, rectangular jackets were cut with a slight curved back and three-quarter-length coats were so dense they looked like they were sculpted from stone. The blouson jacket - a hybrid shirt-jacket with an elastic waist – is another Sander signature that is quickly gaining traction in the rest of the world’s trend radar. Sander washed hers with new borders of neon watermelon or tangerine—a splash of colour that quickly grew to a full pool of hue on her extra-wide Bermuda short suits.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Last season, Jil Sander introduced a wide-leg Bermuda short as the new essential bottom half in her reductive menswear wardrobe. Now that the rest of the fashion world has followed her lead, the designer has cut her short even longer and wider - so much so that it now appears like a pleated culotte or even a woman’s A-line skirt. But Sander avoids the pitfalls of dressing men too much like women with her knife-sharp cutting. Boxy button-down shirts came with scalpel-like collars, rectangular jackets were cut with a slight curved back and three-quarter-length coats were so dense they looked like they were sculpted from stone. The blouson jacket - a hybrid shirt-jacket with an elastic waist – is another Sander signature that is quickly gaining traction in the rest of the world’s trend radar. Sander washed hers with new borders of neon watermelon or tangerine—a splash of colour that quickly grew to a full pool of hue on her extra-wide Bermuda short suits.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Last season, Jil Sander introduced a wide-leg Bermuda short as the new essential bottom half in her reductive menswear wardrobe. Now that the rest of the fashion world has followed her lead, the designer has cut her short even longer and wider - so much so that it now appears like a pleated culotte or even a woman’s A-line skirt. But Sander avoids the pitfalls of dressing men too much like women with her knife-sharp cutting. Boxy button-down shirts came with scalpel-like collars, rectangular jackets were cut with a slight curved back and three-quarter-length coats were so dense they looked like they were sculpted from stone. The blouson jacket - a hybrid shirt-jacket with an elastic waist – is another Sander signature that is quickly gaining traction in the rest of the world’s trend radar. Sander washed hers with new borders of neon watermelon or tangerine—a splash of colour that quickly grew to a full pool of hue on her extra-wide Bermuda short suits.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Last season, Jil Sander introduced a wide-leg Bermuda short as the new essential bottom half in her reductive menswear wardrobe. Now that the rest of the fashion world has followed her lead, the designer has cut her short even longer and wider - so much so that it now appears like a pleated culotte or even a woman’s A-line skirt. But Sander avoids the pitfalls of dressing men too much like women with her knife-sharp cutting. Boxy button-down shirts came with scalpel-like collars, rectangular jackets were cut with a slight curved back and three-quarter-length coats were so dense they looked like they were sculpted from stone. The blouson jacket - a hybrid shirt-jacket with an elastic waist – is another Sander signature that is quickly gaining traction in the rest of the world’s trend radar. Sander washed hers with new borders of neon watermelon or tangerine—a splash of colour that quickly grew to a full pool of hue on her extra-wide Bermuda short suits.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Dolce & Gabbana

The compact yet muscular boys on the Dolce & Gabbana runway signalled two key influences in the Italian label’s Spring menswear collection. The first was a strong return to the meaty 1980s, when pumping out big bold muscles was just as important as wearing the clothes that showed them off to their absolute best. Dolce & Gabbana delivered on this 1980s aesthetic, cutting trousers tighter than skinny jeans, lopping off their lean, wide-lapel, double-breasted jackets right above the models’ buns of steel and stuffing their bronzed boys into retro two-piece knit bathing suits. But the ‘real buff boy’ casting also reflected the other key angle of this collection: a strong sprinkling of the traditional flavour of Southern Italy. As has been their preference of late, the designers wove their own heritage seamlessly into the collection.  Hand-drawn illustrations of classic Roman architecture or idyllic landscapes offered a fresh take on print, especially when used on macho tunics and boxy shorts. The footwear, meanwhile, gave a nod not only to the gladiators favoured in ancient Rome, but also to the woven flat sandals found on the poor feet of every countryside child in Postwar Italy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Dolce & Gabbana 

The compact yet muscular boys on the Dolce & Gabbana runway signalled two key influences in the Italian label’s Spring menswear collection. The first was a strong return to the meaty 1980s, when pumping out big bold muscles was just as important as wearing the clothes that showed them off to their absolute best. Dolce & Gabbana delivered on this 1980s aesthetic, cutting trousers tighter than skinny jeans, lopping off their lean, wide-lapel, double-breasted jackets right above the models’ buns of steel and stuffing their bronzed boys into retro two-piece knit bathing suits. But the ‘real buff boy’ casting also reflected the other key angle of this collection: a strong sprinkling of the traditional flavour of Southern Italy. As has been their preference of late, the designers wove their own heritage seamlessly into the collection.  Hand-drawn illustrations of classic Roman architecture or idyllic landscapes offered a fresh take on print, especially when used on macho tunics and boxy shorts. The footwear, meanwhile, gave a nod not only to the gladiators favoured in ancient Rome, but also to the woven flat sandals found on the poor feet of every countryside child in Postwar Italy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Dolce & Gabbana 

The compact yet muscular boys on the Dolce & Gabbana runway signalled two key influences in the Italian label’s Spring menswear collection. The first was a strong return to the meaty 1980s, when pumping out big bold muscles was just as important as wearing the clothes that showed them off to their absolute best. Dolce & Gabbana delivered on this 1980s aesthetic, cutting trousers tighter than skinny jeans, lopping off their lean, wide-lapel, double-breasted jackets right above the models’ buns of steel and stuffing their bronzed boys into retro two-piece knit bathing suits. But the ‘real buff boy’ casting also reflected the other key angle of this collection: a strong sprinkling of the traditional flavour of Southern Italy. As has been their preference of late, the designers wove their own heritage seamlessly into the collection.  Hand-drawn illustrations of classic Roman architecture or idyllic landscapes offered a fresh take on print, especially when used on macho tunics and boxy shorts. The footwear, meanwhile, gave a nod not only to the gladiators favoured in ancient Rome, but also to the woven flat sandals found on the poor feet of every countryside child in Postwar Italy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Dolce & Gabbana 

The compact yet muscular boys on the Dolce & Gabbana runway signalled two key influences in the Italian label’s Spring menswear collection. The first was a strong return to the meaty 1980s, when pumping out big bold muscles was just as important as wearing the clothes that showed them off to their absolute best. Dolce & Gabbana delivered on this 1980s aesthetic, cutting trousers tighter than skinny jeans, lopping off their lean, wide-lapel, double-breasted jackets right above the models’ buns of steel and stuffing their bronzed boys into retro two-piece knit bathing suits. But the ‘real buff boy’ casting also reflected the other key angle of this collection: a strong sprinkling of the traditional flavour of Southern Italy. As has been their preference of late, the designers wove their own heritage seamlessly into the collection.  Hand-drawn illustrations of classic Roman architecture or idyllic landscapes offered a fresh take on print, especially when used on macho tunics and boxy shorts. The footwear, meanwhile, gave a nod not only to the gladiators favoured in ancient Rome, but also to the woven flat sandals found on the poor feet of every countryside child in Postwar Italy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Dolce & Gabbana 

The compact yet muscular boys on the Dolce & Gabbana runway signalled two key influences in the Italian label’s Spring menswear collection. The first was a strong return to the meaty 1980s, when pumping out big bold muscles was just as important as wearing the clothes that showed them off to their absolute best. Dolce & Gabbana delivered on this 1980s aesthetic, cutting trousers tighter than skinny jeans, lopping off their lean, wide-lapel, double-breasted jackets right above the models’ buns of steel and stuffing their bronzed boys into retro two-piece knit bathing suits. But the ‘real buff boy’ casting also reflected the other key angle of this collection: a strong sprinkling of the traditional flavour of Southern Italy. As has been their preference of late, the designers wove their own heritage seamlessly into the collection.  Hand-drawn illustrations of classic Roman architecture or idyllic landscapes offered a fresh take on print, especially when used on macho tunics and boxy shorts. The footwear, meanwhile, gave a nod not only to the gladiators favoured in ancient Rome, but also to the woven flat sandals found on the poor feet of every countryside child in Postwar Italy.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

Stefano Pilati’s debut at Ermenegildo Zegna has been a hotly anticipated affair in the world of menswear: the central debate being, of course, just how fiercely the avant-garde designer would shake things up at this venerable Italian men’s label. As it turned out, Pilati’s freshman outing was a wonderfully disciplined exercise, with the designer tweaking Zegna’s time-honoured traditions ever so slightly. At the root of this collection were the brand’s exquisite fabrics - from kid mohair mixed with silk and compact striped waffle knits, to pure wools with floral jacquards. You could see the quality a mile away. Patterns came to the surface on slim-cut trousers or short jackets in a powerful wave of understatement that is excruciatingly difficult to achieve. A brilliant cutter, Pilati introduced the smallest of changes to his key menswear silhouettes – from new seamed horizontal panel in the back of jackets, to freshly shaped trapeze overcoats, and vertical pockets angled just at a slight diagonal. A new precision came into focus on the Zegna runway, sidestepping the weird, wacky or overly trendy, in favour of the extraordinary beautiful. Welcome back to Italy, Mr Pilati.

Words: J.J. Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

Stefano Pilati’s debut at Ermenegildo Zegna has been a hotly anticipated affair in the world of menswear: the central debate being, of course, just how fiercely the avant-garde designer would shake things up at this venerable Italian men’s label. As it turned out, Pilati’s freshman outing was a wonderfully disciplined exercise, with the designer tweaking Zegna’s time-honoured traditions ever so slightly. At the root of this collection were the brand’s exquisite fabrics - from kid mohair mixed with silk and compact striped waffle knits, to pure wools with floral jacquards. You could see the quality a mile away. Patterns came to the surface on slim-cut trousers or short jackets in a powerful wave of understatement that is excruciatingly difficult to achieve. A brilliant cutter, Pilati introduced the smallest of changes to his key menswear silhouettes – from new seamed horizontal panel in the back of jackets, to freshly shaped trapeze overcoats, and vertical pockets angled just at a slight diagonal. A new precision came into focus on the Zegna runway, sidestepping the weird, wacky or overly trendy, in favour of the extraordinary beautiful. Welcome back to Italy, Mr Pilati.

Words: J.J. Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

Stefano Pilati’s debut at Ermenegildo Zegna has been a hotly anticipated affair in the world of menswear: the central debate being, of course, just how fiercely the avant-garde designer would shake things up at this venerable Italian men’s label. As it turned out, Pilati’s freshman outing was a wonderfully disciplined exercise, with the designer tweaking Zegna’s time-honoured traditions ever so slightly. At the root of this collection were the brand’s exquisite fabrics - from kid mohair mixed with silk and compact striped waffle knits, to pure wools with floral jacquards. You could see the quality a mile away. Patterns came to the surface on slim-cut trousers or short jackets in a powerful wave of understatement that is excruciatingly difficult to achieve. A brilliant cutter, Pilati introduced the smallest of changes to his key menswear silhouettes – from new seamed horizontal panel in the back of jackets, to freshly shaped trapeze overcoats, and vertical pockets angled just at a slight diagonal. A new precision came into focus on the Zegna runway, sidestepping the weird, wacky or overly trendy, in favour of the extraordinary beautiful. Welcome back to Italy, Mr Pilati.

Words: J.J. Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

Stefano Pilati’s debut at Ermenegildo Zegna has been a hotly anticipated affair in the world of menswear: the central debate being, of course, just how fiercely the avant-garde designer would shake things up at this venerable Italian men’s label. As it turned out, Pilati’s freshman outing was a wonderfully disciplined exercise, with the designer tweaking Zegna’s time-honoured traditions ever so slightly. At the root of this collection were the brand’s exquisite fabrics - from kid mohair mixed with silk and compact striped waffle knits, to pure wools with floral jacquards. You could see the quality a mile away. Patterns came to the surface on slim-cut trousers or short jackets in a powerful wave of understatement that is excruciatingly difficult to achieve. A brilliant cutter, Pilati introduced the smallest of changes to his key menswear silhouettes – from new seamed horizontal panel in the back of jackets, to freshly shaped trapeze overcoats, and vertical pockets angled just at a slight diagonal. A new precision came into focus on the Zegna runway, sidestepping the weird, wacky or overly trendy, in favour of the extraordinary beautiful. Welcome back to Italy, Mr Pilati.

Words: J.J. Martin

Ermenegildo Zegna

Stefano Pilati’s debut at Ermenegildo Zegna has been a hotly anticipated affair in the world of menswear: the central debate being, of course, just how fiercely the avant-garde designer would shake things up at this venerable Italian men’s label. As it turned out, Pilati’s freshman outing was a wonderfully disciplined exercise, with the designer tweaking Zegna’s time-honoured traditions ever so slightly. At the root of this collection were the brand’s exquisite fabrics - from kid mohair mixed with silk and compact striped waffle knits, to pure wools with floral jacquards. You could see the quality a mile away. Patterns came to the surface on slim-cut trousers or short jackets in a powerful wave of understatement that is excruciatingly difficult to achieve. A brilliant cutter, Pilati introduced the smallest of changes to his key menswear silhouettes – from new seamed horizontal panel in the back of jackets, to freshly shaped trapeze overcoats, and vertical pockets angled just at a slight diagonal. A new precision came into focus on the Zegna runway, sidestepping the weird, wacky or overly trendy, in favour of the extraordinary beautiful. Welcome back to Italy, Mr Pilati.

Words: J.J. Martin

Neil Barrett

The moment Neil Barrett name-checked design legends Charles and Ray Eames in his show notes we were, unsurprisingly, hooked. Bringing furniture engineering to the body proved to be a facile for Barrett, who is a great lover and collector of the work of mid-century furniture designers, in addition to being a master cutter of modern clothing. ‘I'm obsessed, absolutely obsessed!’ the designer said backstage after his show, but acknowledged that he'd never brought furniture and fashion together in a collection before. ‘I'm looking for a curve - always a curve,’ he elaborated further on his collection’s inspiration. This season the curves came in the form of inlaid black and white waves cut into the designer’s preferred sportswear shapes - sweatshirts, stiff T-Shirts, boxy shorts and bomber jackets. Many of the pieces featured the horizontal quilting and punctured seaming found on Eames’ famous office chairs, but the collection wasn’t entirely modernist in its leanings. Barrett also sprinkled a heavy dose of lumberjack plaids across his clean, compact fabrics, giving new 21st-century life to Seattle-born grunge.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Neil Barrett

The moment Neil Barrett name-checked design legends Charles and Ray Eames in his show notes we were, unsurprisingly, hooked. Bringing furniture engineering to the body proved to be a facile for Barrett, who is a great lover and collector of the work of mid-century furniture designers, in addition to being a master cutter of modern clothing. ‘I'm obsessed, absolutely obsessed!’ the designer said backstage after his show, but acknowledged that he'd never brought furniture and fashion together in a collection before. ‘I'm looking for a curve - always a curve,’ he elaborated further on his collection’s inspiration. This season the curves came in the form of inlaid black and white waves cut into the designer’s preferred sportswear shapes - sweatshirts, stiff T-Shirts, boxy shorts and bomber jackets. Many of the pieces featured the horizontal quilting and punctured seaming found on Eames’ famous office chairs, but the collection wasn’t entirely modernist in its leanings. Barrett also sprinkled a heavy dose of lumberjack plaids across his clean, compact fabrics, giving new 21st-century life to Seattle-born grunge.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Neil Barrett

The moment Neil Barrett name-checked design legends Charles and Ray Eames in his show notes we were, unsurprisingly, hooked. Bringing furniture engineering to the body proved to be a facile for Barrett, who is a great lover and collector of the work of mid-century furniture designers, in addition to being a master cutter of modern clothing. ‘I'm obsessed, absolutely obsessed!’ the designer said backstage after his show, but acknowledged that he'd never brought furniture and fashion together in a collection before. ‘I'm looking for a curve - always a curve,’ he elaborated further on his collection’s inspiration. This season the curves came in the form of inlaid black and white waves cut into the designer’s preferred sportswear shapes - sweatshirts, stiff T-Shirts, boxy shorts and bomber jackets. Many of the pieces featured the horizontal quilting and punctured seaming found on Eames’ famous office chairs, but the collection wasn’t entirely modernist in its leanings. Barrett also sprinkled a heavy dose of lumberjack plaids across his clean, compact fabrics, giving new 21st-century life to Seattle-born grunge.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Neil Barrett

The moment Neil Barrett name-checked design legends Charles and Ray Eames in his show notes we were, unsurprisingly, hooked. Bringing furniture engineering to the body proved to be a facile for Barrett, who is a great lover and collector of the work of mid-century furniture designers, in addition to being a master cutter of modern clothing. ‘I'm obsessed, absolutely obsessed!’ the designer said backstage after his show, but acknowledged that he'd never brought furniture and fashion together in a collection before. ‘I'm looking for a curve - always a curve,’ he elaborated further on his collection’s inspiration. This season the curves came in the form of inlaid black and white waves cut into the designer’s preferred sportswear shapes - sweatshirts, stiff T-Shirts, boxy shorts and bomber jackets. Many of the pieces featured the horizontal quilting and punctured seaming found on Eames’ famous office chairs, but the collection wasn’t entirely modernist in its leanings. Barrett also sprinkled a heavy dose of lumberjack plaids across his clean, compact fabrics, giving new 21st-century life to Seattle-born grunge.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Neil Barrett

The moment Neil Barrett name-checked design legends Charles and Ray Eames in his show notes we were, unsurprisingly, hooked. Bringing furniture engineering to the body proved to be a facile for Barrett, who is a great lover and collector of the work of mid-century furniture designers, in addition to being a master cutter of modern clothing. ‘I'm obsessed, absolutely obsessed!’ the designer said backstage after his show, but acknowledged that he'd never brought furniture and fashion together in a collection before. ‘I'm looking for a curve - always a curve,’ he elaborated further on his collection’s inspiration. This season the curves came in the form of inlaid black and white waves cut into the designer’s preferred sportswear shapes - sweatshirts, stiff T-Shirts, boxy shorts and bomber jackets. Many of the pieces featured the horizontal quilting and punctured seaming found on Eames’ famous office chairs, but the collection wasn’t entirely modernist in its leanings. Barrett also sprinkled a heavy dose of lumberjack plaids across his clean, compact fabrics, giving new 21st-century life to Seattle-born grunge.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace continued her fashion affair with exuberance this season, delivering a collection high on colour, body-trimming silhouettes and a new striking decorative device: colourful strips of athletic tape, worn as a tattoo both on bare skin as well as on sweatshirts paired with barely-there bikini briefs. Normally a muscle-healer, these patches of colourful tape became a new printing device, providing a contrasting foil for the rest of the house’s well-known iconography. Baroque printed silk shirts, gold Medusa medallions and gladiator sandals were all there this season, mixed up with skin-tight 1980s tailored suits and micro gold stud leather jackets. A few classic Versace looks couldn’t help but make it into Spring’s line up – take for instance the lush black bathrobe worn over a skimpy bikini - but the novelty was in the new use of colour-blocking and over-painting on jumpsuits, jeans and shirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace continued her fashion affair with exuberance this season, delivering a collection high on colour, body-trimming silhouettes and a new striking decorative device: colourful strips of athletic tape, worn as a tattoo both on bare skin as well as on sweatshirts paired with barely-there bikini briefs. Normally a muscle-healer, these patches of colourful tape became a new printing device, providing a contrasting foil for the rest of the house’s well-known iconography. Baroque printed silk shirts, gold Medusa medallions and gladiator sandals were all there this season, mixed up with skin-tight 1980s tailored suits and micro gold stud leather jackets. A few classic Versace looks couldn’t help but make it into Spring’s line up – take for instance the lush black bathrobe worn over a skimpy bikini - but the novelty was in the new use of colour-blocking and over-painting on jumpsuits, jeans and shirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace continued her fashion affair with exuberance this season, delivering a collection high on colour, body-trimming silhouettes and a new striking decorative device: colourful strips of athletic tape, worn as a tattoo both on bare skin as well as on sweatshirts paired with barely-there bikini briefs. Normally a muscle-healer, these patches of colourful tape became a new printing device, providing a contrasting foil for the rest of the house’s well-known iconography. Baroque printed silk shirts, gold Medusa medallions and gladiator sandals were all there this season, mixed up with skin-tight 1980s tailored suits and micro gold stud leather jackets. A few classic Versace looks couldn’t help but make it into Spring’s line up – take for instance the lush black bathrobe worn over a skimpy bikini - but the novelty was in the new use of colour-blocking and over-painting on jumpsuits, jeans and shirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace continued her fashion affair with exuberance this season, delivering a collection high on colour, body-trimming silhouettes and a new striking decorative device: colourful strips of athletic tape, worn as a tattoo both on bare skin as well as on sweatshirts paired with barely-there bikini briefs. Normally a muscle-healer, these patches of colourful tape became a new printing device, providing a contrasting foil for the rest of the house’s well-known iconography. Baroque printed silk shirts, gold Medusa medallions and gladiator sandals were all there this season, mixed up with skin-tight 1980s tailored suits and micro gold stud leather jackets. A few classic Versace looks couldn’t help but make it into Spring’s line up – take for instance the lush black bathrobe worn over a skimpy bikini - but the novelty was in the new use of colour-blocking and over-painting on jumpsuits, jeans and shirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Versace

Donatella Versace continued her fashion affair with exuberance this season, delivering a collection high on colour, body-trimming silhouettes and a new striking decorative device: colourful strips of athletic tape, worn as a tattoo both on bare skin as well as on sweatshirts paired with barely-there bikini briefs. Normally a muscle-healer, these patches of colourful tape became a new printing device, providing a contrasting foil for the rest of the house’s well-known iconography. Baroque printed silk shirts, gold Medusa medallions and gladiator sandals were all there this season, mixed up with skin-tight 1980s tailored suits and micro gold stud leather jackets. A few classic Versace looks couldn’t help but make it into Spring’s line up – take for instance the lush black bathrobe worn over a skimpy bikini - but the novelty was in the new use of colour-blocking and over-painting on jumpsuits, jeans and shirts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Proper suiting made a big splash at Bottega Veneta, where Tomas Maier brought subtle, contemporary tweaks to the classic menswear tradition. And with dotted-line stripes of chalk being marked on grey gabardines and crisp navy cottons, the hand of the tailor was literally visible. The cool design detail made slope-shouldered jackets and narrow trousers appear like half-made suit muslins. That trompe l'oeil trick continued on a beautiful white leather bomber covered in a tangle of black zigzag stitching, as if a sewing machine had gone mad. The dressed-up mood of the collection was also seen in the casual looks. Proper slacks were paired with sharp shirt jackets, crisp polo jackets or buttery suede lean jackets. Also noteworthy, the new 'downtime' uniform: a dazzling black and white windowpane check that looked just right on a short-sleeve shirt and matching trouser.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Proper suiting made a big splash at Bottega Veneta, where Tomas Maier brought subtle, contemporary tweaks to the classic menswear tradition. And with dotted-line stripes of chalk being marked on grey gabardines and crisp navy cottons, the hand of the tailor was literally visible. The cool design detail made slope-shouldered jackets and narrow trousers appear like half-made suit muslins. That trompe l'oeil trick continued on a beautiful white leather bomber covered in a tangle of black zigzag stitching, as if a sewing machine had gone mad. The dressed-up mood of the collection was also seen in the casual looks. Proper slacks were paired with sharp shirt jackets, crisp polo jackets or buttery suede lean jackets. Also noteworthy, the new 'downtime' uniform: a dazzling black and white windowpane check that looked just right on a short-sleeve shirt and matching trouser.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Proper suiting made a big splash at Bottega Veneta, where Tomas Maier brought subtle, contemporary tweaks to the classic menswear tradition. And with dotted-line stripes of chalk being marked on grey gabardines and crisp navy cottons, the hand of the tailor was literally visible. The cool design detail made slope-shouldered jackets and narrow trousers appear like half-made suit muslins. That trompe l'oeil trick continued on a beautiful white leather bomber covered in a tangle of black zigzag stitching, as if a sewing machine had gone mad. The dressed-up mood of the collection was also seen in the casual looks. Proper slacks were paired with sharp shirt jackets, crisp polo jackets or buttery suede lean jackets. Also noteworthy, the new 'downtime' uniform: a dazzling black and white windowpane check that looked just right on a short-sleeve shirt and matching trouser.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Proper suiting made a big splash at Bottega Veneta, where Tomas Maier brought subtle, contemporary tweaks to the classic menswear tradition. And with dotted-line stripes of chalk being marked on grey gabardines and crisp navy cottons, the hand of the tailor was literally visible. The cool design detail made slope-shouldered jackets and narrow trousers appear like half-made suit muslins. That trompe l'oeil trick continued on a beautiful white leather bomber covered in a tangle of black zigzag stitching, as if a sewing machine had gone mad. The dressed-up mood of the collection was also seen in the casual looks. Proper slacks were paired with sharp shirt jackets, crisp polo jackets or buttery suede lean jackets. Also noteworthy, the new 'downtime' uniform: a dazzling black and white windowpane check that looked just right on a short-sleeve shirt and matching trouser.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Bottega Veneta

Proper suiting made a big splash at Bottega Veneta, where Tomas Maier brought subtle, contemporary tweaks to the classic menswear tradition. And with dotted-line stripes of chalk being marked on grey gabardines and crisp navy cottons, the hand of the tailor was literally visible. The cool design detail made slope-shouldered jackets and narrow trousers appear like half-made suit muslins. That trompe l'oeil trick continued on a beautiful white leather bomber covered in a tangle of black zigzag stitching, as if a sewing machine had gone mad. The dressed-up mood of the collection was also seen in the casual looks. Proper slacks were paired with sharp shirt jackets, crisp polo jackets or buttery suede lean jackets. Also noteworthy, the new 'downtime' uniform: a dazzling black and white windowpane check that looked just right on a short-sleeve shirt and matching trouser.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Trussardi's newest creative director was plucked from the branches of its own family tree. Gaia Trussardi, the great granddaughter of founder Dante Trussardi, took to the reigns this season to deliver a confident collection which returned to the house's roots. The Italian brand began as a luxury leather goods house, and Trussardi took the leather theme and ran with it, delivering looks that utilised the likes of paper-thin calfskin, spotty ostrich or scaly python. The highbrow materials were brought down to earth thanks to the use of informal shapes tinged with a sportswear influence. We saw basketball shorts, jogging pants, bomber jackets, tank tops and trenches - all cut from leather or exotic skins in shades of butter, cream, wheat and cornflower blue. The boys looked good but were boiling in Milan's heat; here's hoping they don't plan to spend next spring in a hot city.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Trussardi's newest creative director was plucked from the branches of its own family tree. Gaia Trussardi, the great granddaughter of founder Dante Trussardi, took to the reigns this season to deliver a confident collection which returned to the house's roots. The Italian brand began as a luxury leather goods house, and Trussardi took the leather theme and ran with it, delivering looks that utilised the likes of paper-thin calfskin, spotty ostrich or scaly python. The highbrow materials were brought down to earth thanks to the use of informal shapes tinged with a sportswear influence. We saw basketball shorts, jogging pants, bomber jackets, tank tops and trenches - all cut from leather or exotic skins in shades of butter, cream, wheat and cornflower blue. The boys looked good but were boiling in Milan's heat; here's hoping they don't plan to spend next spring in a hot city.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Trussardi's newest creative director was plucked from the branches of its own family tree. Gaia Trussardi, the great granddaughter of founder Dante Trussardi, took to the reigns this season to deliver a confident collection which returned to the house's roots. The Italian brand began as a luxury leather goods house, and Trussardi took the leather theme and ran with it, delivering looks that utilised the likes of paper-thin calfskin, spotty ostrich or scaly python. The highbrow materials were brought down to earth thanks to the use of informal shapes tinged with a sportswear influence. We saw basketball shorts, jogging pants, bomber jackets, tank tops and trenches - all cut from leather or exotic skins in shades of butter, cream, wheat and cornflower blue. The boys looked good but were boiling in Milan's heat; here's hoping they don't plan to spend next spring in a hot city.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Trussardi's newest creative director was plucked from the branches of its own family tree. Gaia Trussardi, the great granddaughter of founder Dante Trussardi, took to the reigns this season to deliver a confident collection which returned to the house's roots. The Italian brand began as a luxury leather goods house, and Trussardi took the leather theme and ran with it, delivering looks that utilised the likes of paper-thin calfskin, spotty ostrich or scaly python. The highbrow materials were brought down to earth thanks to the use of informal shapes tinged with a sportswear influence. We saw basketball shorts, jogging pants, bomber jackets, tank tops and trenches - all cut from leather or exotic skins in shades of butter, cream, wheat and cornflower blue. The boys looked good but were boiling in Milan's heat; here's hoping they don't plan to spend next spring in a hot city.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Trussardi

Trussardi's newest creative director was plucked from the branches of its own family tree. Gaia Trussardi, the great granddaughter of founder Dante Trussardi, took to the reigns this season to deliver a confident collection which returned to the house's roots. The Italian brand began as a luxury leather goods house, and Trussardi took the leather theme and ran with it, delivering looks that utilised the likes of paper-thin calfskin, spotty ostrich or scaly python. The highbrow materials were brought down to earth thanks to the use of informal shapes tinged with a sportswear influence. We saw basketball shorts, jogging pants, bomber jackets, tank tops and trenches - all cut from leather or exotic skins in shades of butter, cream, wheat and cornflower blue. The boys looked good but were boiling in Milan's heat; here's hoping they don't plan to spend next spring in a hot city.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giornetti loves a well-focused creative journey (and so, by the way, do we). This season he drew his collection around an athletic theme. Rather than muscle-pumping gym gear, Giornetti delivered cool, crisp classics that were dipped in fresh coats of saturated colour and set off with oversized numbers, creating an abstract optical effect on the backs of jersey jackets or on the front of knit tank tops. The colours were as fresh as a plunge in a pool: grass green mingled with navy, a mustard-like caramel was paired with bright white, and hot orange popped out throughout. The entire collection possessed a new crispness, as if the crackling cottons had been finely starched for hours, lending a luxurious hand to the casual sportswear silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giornetti loves a well-focused creative journey (and so, by the way, do we). This season he drew his collection around an athletic theme. Rather than muscle-pumping gym gear, Giornetti delivered cool, crisp classics that were dipped in fresh coats of saturated colour and set off with oversized numbers, creating an abstract optical effect on the backs of jersey jackets or on the front of knit tank tops. The colours were as fresh as a plunge in a pool: grass green mingled with navy, a mustard-like caramel was paired with bright white, and hot orange popped out throughout. The entire collection possessed a new crispness, as if the crackling cottons had been finely starched for hours, lending a luxurious hand to the casual sportswear silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giornetti loves a well-focused creative journey (and so, by the way, do we). This season he drew his collection around an athletic theme. Rather than muscle-pumping gym gear, Giornetti delivered cool, crisp classics that were dipped in fresh coats of saturated colour and set off with oversized numbers, creating an abstract optical effect on the backs of jersey jackets or on the front of knit tank tops. The colours were as fresh as a plunge in a pool: grass green mingled with navy, a mustard-like caramel was paired with bright white, and hot orange popped out throughout. The entire collection possessed a new crispness, as if the crackling cottons had been finely starched for hours, lending a luxurious hand to the casual sportswear silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giornetti loves a well-focused creative journey (and so, by the way, do we). This season he drew his collection around an athletic theme. Rather than muscle-pumping gym gear, Giornetti delivered cool, crisp classics that were dipped in fresh coats of saturated colour and set off with oversized numbers, creating an abstract optical effect on the backs of jersey jackets or on the front of knit tank tops. The colours were as fresh as a plunge in a pool: grass green mingled with navy, a mustard-like caramel was paired with bright white, and hot orange popped out throughout. The entire collection possessed a new crispness, as if the crackling cottons had been finely starched for hours, lending a luxurious hand to the casual sportswear silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

Ferragamo creative director Massimiliano Giornetti loves a well-focused creative journey (and so, by the way, do we). This season he drew his collection around an athletic theme. Rather than muscle-pumping gym gear, Giornetti delivered cool, crisp classics that were dipped in fresh coats of saturated colour and set off with oversized numbers, creating an abstract optical effect on the backs of jersey jackets or on the front of knit tank tops. The colours were as fresh as a plunge in a pool: grass green mingled with navy, a mustard-like caramel was paired with bright white, and hot orange popped out throughout. The entire collection possessed a new crispness, as if the crackling cottons had been finely starched for hours, lending a luxurious hand to the casual sportswear silhouettes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

The motto 'Time flies when you are having fun' certainly applies to Calvin Klein, where menswear creative director Italo Zucchelli is now celebrating his 10-year anniversary at the house. How sudden that feels, given that Zucchelli's path of sharp-cutting slim silhouettes and bold colour for Calvin's men still feels freshly paved. This season he looked to the sky for his bright palette, pulling in every shade of azure, from baby to electric blue. He also set a fiery sunset motif blazing across super compact T-Shirts and sweatshirts. But the most intriguing part of this collection came right at the start, when Zucchelli presented hybrid tops that seamlessly combined the billowing silk sleeves of a shirt, the back of a techno-weave waistcoat and the front of a slim bomber jacket. The cross-pollination deceived and delighted the eye, putting this designer's true sartorial skills right in the foreground.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

The motto 'Time flies when you are having fun' certainly applies to Calvin Klein, where menswear creative director Italo Zucchelli is now celebrating his 10-year anniversary at the house. How sudden that feels, given that Zucchelli's path of sharp-cutting slim silhouettes and bold colour for Calvin's men still feels freshly paved. This season he looked to the sky for his bright palette, pulling in every shade of azure, from baby to electric blue. He also set a fiery sunset motif blazing across super compact T-Shirts and sweatshirts. But the most intriguing part of this collection came right at the start, when Zucchelli presented hybrid tops that seamlessly combined the billowing silk sleeves of a shirt, the back of a techno-weave waistcoat and the front of a slim bomber jacket. The cross-pollination deceived and delighted the eye, putting this designer's true sartorial skills right in the foreground.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

The motto 'Time flies when you are having fun' certainly applies to Calvin Klein, where menswear creative director Italo Zucchelli is now celebrating his 10-year anniversary at the house. How sudden that feels, given that Zucchelli's path of sharp-cutting slim silhouettes and bold colour for Calvin's men still feels freshly paved. This season he looked to the sky for his bright palette, pulling in every shade of azure, from baby to electric blue. He also set a fiery sunset motif blazing across super compact T-Shirts and sweatshirts. But the most intriguing part of this collection came right at the start, when Zucchelli presented hybrid tops that seamlessly combined the billowing silk sleeves of a shirt, the back of a techno-weave waistcoat and the front of a slim bomber jacket. The cross-pollination deceived and delighted the eye, putting this designer's true sartorial skills right in the foreground.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

The motto 'Time flies when you are having fun' certainly applies to Calvin Klein, where menswear creative director Italo Zucchelli is now celebrating his 10-year anniversary at the house. How sudden that feels, given that Zucchelli's path of sharp-cutting slim silhouettes and bold colour for Calvin's men still feels freshly paved. This season he looked to the sky for his bright palette, pulling in every shade of azure, from baby to electric blue. He also set a fiery sunset motif blazing across super compact T-Shirts and sweatshirts. But the most intriguing part of this collection came right at the start, when Zucchelli presented hybrid tops that seamlessly combined the billowing silk sleeves of a shirt, the back of a techno-weave waistcoat and the front of a slim bomber jacket. The cross-pollination deceived and delighted the eye, putting this designer's true sartorial skills right in the foreground.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Calvin Klein Collection

The motto 'Time flies when you are having fun' certainly applies to Calvin Klein, where menswear creative director Italo Zucchelli is now celebrating his 10-year anniversary at the house. How sudden that feels, given that Zucchelli's path of sharp-cutting slim silhouettes and bold colour for Calvin's men still feels freshly paved. This season he looked to the sky for his bright palette, pulling in every shade of azure, from baby to electric blue. He also set a fiery sunset motif blazing across super compact T-Shirts and sweatshirts. But the most intriguing part of this collection came right at the start, when Zucchelli presented hybrid tops that seamlessly combined the billowing silk sleeves of a shirt, the back of a techno-weave waistcoat and the front of a slim bomber jacket. The cross-pollination deceived and delighted the eye, putting this designer's true sartorial skills right in the foreground.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: J.J. Martin

Missoni

The Missoni man undoubtedly looks set to spend a long, sweet summer under a thatched roof with a view of glimmering emerald waters for company. His wardrobe it seems, will be almost entirely knit-based - from the gauziest of light sweaters and Bermuda shorts to cosy, body-hugging jackets paired with relaxed trousers. The tranquil mood was underscored this season by a meditative palette; think dusty rose, pale sea green and indigo blue mixed with creams and khakis. Missoni classics got a new twist thanks to a special loom knit fabric made with rubber-coated yarn. That, together with rough thread and metal embroideries, tie-dye inspired prints, and swinging suede amulet necklaces, made this offering a sure-fire hit for drinking an icy beer under the scorching sun.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

The Missoni man undoubtedly looks set to spend a long, sweet summer under a thatched roof with a view of glimmering emerald waters for company. His wardrobe it seems, will be almost entirely knit-based - from the gauziest of light sweaters and Bermuda shorts to cosy, body-hugging jackets paired with relaxed trousers. The tranquil mood was underscored this season by a meditative palette; think dusty rose, pale sea green and indigo blue mixed with creams and khakis. Missoni classics got a new twist thanks to a special loom knit fabric made with rubber-coated yarn. That, together with rough thread and metal embroideries, tie-dye inspired prints, and swinging suede amulet necklaces, made this offering a sure-fire hit for drinking an icy beer under the scorching sun.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

The Missoni man undoubtedly looks set to spend a long, sweet summer under a thatched roof with a view of glimmering emerald waters for company. His wardrobe it seems, will be almost entirely knit-based - from the gauziest of light sweaters and Bermuda shorts to cosy, body-hugging jackets paired with relaxed trousers. The tranquil mood was underscored this season by a meditative palette; think dusty rose, pale sea green and indigo blue mixed with creams and khakis. Missoni classics got a new twist thanks to a special loom knit fabric made with rubber-coated yarn. That, together with rough thread and metal embroideries, tie-dye inspired prints, and swinging suede amulet necklaces, made this offering a sure-fire hit for drinking an icy beer under the scorching sun.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

The Missoni man undoubtedly looks set to spend a long, sweet summer under a thatched roof with a view of glimmering emerald waters for company. His wardrobe it seems, will be almost entirely knit-based - from the gauziest of light sweaters and Bermuda shorts to cosy, body-hugging jackets paired with relaxed trousers. The tranquil mood was underscored this season by a meditative palette; think dusty rose, pale sea green and indigo blue mixed with creams and khakis. Missoni classics got a new twist thanks to a special loom knit fabric made with rubber-coated yarn. That, together with rough thread and metal embroideries, tie-dye inspired prints, and swinging suede amulet necklaces, made this offering a sure-fire hit for drinking an icy beer under the scorching sun.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Missoni

The Missoni man undoubtedly looks set to spend a long, sweet summer under a thatched roof with a view of glimmering emerald waters for company. His wardrobe it seems, will be almost entirely knit-based - from the gauziest of light sweaters and Bermuda shorts to cosy, body-hugging jackets paired with relaxed trousers. The tranquil mood was underscored this season by a meditative palette; think dusty rose, pale sea green and indigo blue mixed with creams and khakis. Missoni classics got a new twist thanks to a special loom knit fabric made with rubber-coated yarn. That, together with rough thread and metal embroideries, tie-dye inspired prints, and swinging suede amulet necklaces, made this offering a sure-fire hit for drinking an icy beer under the scorching sun.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

As usual, Miuccia Prada delivered boatloads of fresh bounty to her menswear runway, ensuring that the wheels of fashion trends will churn along safely and smoothly next season. The most pressing news for fashion's loyal disciples is that tropical prints are back. Emblazoned across knit sweaters and silk shirts, the foliage and sunset motifs added a summery punch to otherwise sober men's suiting. The mood and silhouette were 1970s by way of the 1940s, with trousers puffed up to new volumes and cinched tightly at the waist with a stripy belt. Carrying boxy leaf-print valises, and showing off crimped clothes and moist brows, Prada's retro troop conjured up images of a dapper tourist perspiring in Southeast Asia fifty years ago. But the collection quickly sped up to today with lace-ups dipped in coatings of colorful rubber and fabric-blocked boots. We also loved, we must confess, the women's outfits: crystal-spangled sleeves on 1940s-cut knit intarsia dresses - an exciting preview of the womenswear show to come.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

As usual, Miuccia Prada delivered boatloads of fresh bounty to her menswear runway, ensuring that the wheels of fashion trends will churn along safely and smoothly next season. The most pressing news for fashion's loyal disciples is that tropical prints are back. Emblazoned across knit sweaters and silk shirts, the foliage and sunset motifs added a summery punch to otherwise sober men's suiting. The mood and silhouette were 1970s by way of the 1940s, with trousers puffed up to new volumes and cinched tightly at the waist with a stripy belt. Carrying boxy leaf-print valises, and showing off crimped clothes and moist brows, Prada's retro troop conjured up images of a dapper tourist perspiring in Southeast Asia fifty years ago. But the collection quickly sped up to today with lace-ups dipped in coatings of colorful rubber and fabric-blocked boots. We also loved, we must confess, the women's outfits: crystal-spangled sleeves on 1940s-cut knit intarsia dresses - an exciting preview of the womenswear show to come.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

As usual, Miuccia Prada delivered boatloads of fresh bounty to her menswear runway, ensuring that the wheels of fashion trends will churn along safely and smoothly next season. The most pressing news for fashion's loyal disciples is that tropical prints are back. Emblazoned across knit sweaters and silk shirts, the foliage and sunset motifs added a summery punch to otherwise sober men's suiting. The mood and silhouette were 1970s by way of the 1940s, with trousers puffed up to new volumes and cinched tightly at the waist with a stripy belt. Carrying boxy leaf-print valises, and showing off crimped clothes and moist brows, Prada's retro troop conjured up images of a dapper tourist perspiring in Southeast Asia fifty years ago. But the collection quickly sped up to today with lace-ups dipped in coatings of colorful rubber and fabric-blocked boots. We also loved, we must confess, the women's outfits: crystal-spangled sleeves on 1940s-cut knit intarsia dresses - an exciting preview of the womenswear show to come.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

As usual, Miuccia Prada delivered boatloads of fresh bounty to her menswear runway, ensuring that the wheels of fashion trends will churn along safely and smoothly next season. The most pressing news for fashion's loyal disciples is that tropical prints are back. Emblazoned across knit sweaters and silk shirts, the foliage and sunset motifs added a summery punch to otherwise sober men's suiting. The mood and silhouette were 1970s by way of the 1940s, with trousers puffed up to new volumes and cinched tightly at the waist with a stripy belt. Carrying boxy leaf-print valises, and showing off crimped clothes and moist brows, Prada's retro troop conjured up images of a dapper tourist perspiring in Southeast Asia fifty years ago. But the collection quickly sped up to today with lace-ups dipped in coatings of colorful rubber and fabric-blocked boots. We also loved, we must confess, the women's outfits: crystal-spangled sleeves on 1940s-cut knit intarsia dresses - an exciting preview of the womenswear show to come.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Prada

As usual, Miuccia Prada delivered boatloads of fresh bounty to her menswear runway, ensuring that the wheels of fashion trends will churn along safely and smoothly next season. The most pressing news for fashion's loyal disciples is that tropical prints are back. Emblazoned across knit sweaters and silk shirts, the foliage and sunset motifs added a summery punch to otherwise sober men's suiting. The mood and silhouette were 1970s by way of the 1940s, with trousers puffed up to new volumes and cinched tightly at the waist with a stripy belt. Carrying boxy leaf-print valises, and showing off crimped clothes and moist brows, Prada's retro troop conjured up images of a dapper tourist perspiring in Southeast Asia fifty years ago. But the collection quickly sped up to today with lace-ups dipped in coatings of colorful rubber and fabric-blocked boots. We also loved, we must confess, the women's outfits: crystal-spangled sleeves on 1940s-cut knit intarsia dresses - an exciting preview of the womenswear show to come.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

It's cricket time, boys! Thom Browne, the ingenious creative director heading up Moncler Gamme Bleu, showed us endless chic iterations of the sport's uniform. Padded, quilted, with navy trimming, red stripes, and skinny ties tucked under polite collars, layers of polished protection covered Moncler's sportsmen as they paraded down the runway, matching cricket bats in hand. Browne's strict use of pure, eye-popping white - his favourite non-colour colour - ensured that the perfectly groomed men came sharply into focus. So too did their lips, which were lacquered with an offbeat lick of opaque black polish. Who knew there were so many ways to wear head-to-toe white?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

It's cricket time, boys! Thom Browne, the ingenious creative director heading up Moncler Gamme Bleu, showed us endless chic iterations of the sport's uniform. Padded, quilted, with navy trimming, red stripes, and skinny ties tucked under polite collars, layers of polished protection covered Moncler's sportsmen as they paraded down the runway, matching cricket bats in hand. Browne's strict use of pure, eye-popping white - his favourite non-colour colour - ensured that the perfectly groomed men came sharply into focus. So too did their lips, which were lacquered with an offbeat lick of opaque black polish. Who knew there were so many ways to wear head-to-toe white?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

It's cricket time, boys! Thom Browne, the ingenious creative director heading up Moncler Gamme Bleu, showed us endless chic iterations of the sport's uniform. Padded, quilted, with navy trimming, red stripes, and skinny ties tucked under polite collars, layers of polished protection covered Moncler's sportsmen as they paraded down the runway, matching cricket bats in hand. Browne's strict use of pure, eye-popping white - his favourite non-colour colour - ensured that the perfectly groomed men came sharply into focus. So too did their lips, which were lacquered with an offbeat lick of opaque black polish. Who knew there were so many ways to wear head-to-toe white?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

It's cricket time, boys! Thom Browne, the ingenious creative director heading up Moncler Gamme Bleu, showed us endless chic iterations of the sport's uniform. Padded, quilted, with navy trimming, red stripes, and skinny ties tucked under polite collars, layers of polished protection covered Moncler's sportsmen as they paraded down the runway, matching cricket bats in hand. Browne's strict use of pure, eye-popping white - his favourite non-colour colour - ensured that the perfectly groomed men came sharply into focus. So too did their lips, which were lacquered with an offbeat lick of opaque black polish. Who knew there were so many ways to wear head-to-toe white?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Bleu

It's cricket time, boys! Thom Browne, the ingenious creative director heading up Moncler Gamme Bleu, showed us endless chic iterations of the sport's uniform. Padded, quilted, with navy trimming, red stripes, and skinny ties tucked under polite collars, layers of polished protection covered Moncler's sportsmen as they paraded down the runway, matching cricket bats in hand. Browne's strict use of pure, eye-popping white - his favourite non-colour colour - ensured that the perfectly groomed men came sharply into focus. So too did their lips, which were lacquered with an offbeat lick of opaque black polish. Who knew there were so many ways to wear head-to-toe white?

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

Roberto Cavalli's son Daniele is quickly shaping up to be one to watch. As creative director of menswear, Daniele brought a cutting-edge sense of modernity to his father's typically flashy fashion label. Set in the splendid garden of a 15th-century Milanese 'condominium', Cavalli presented this season's collection as an exhibit of photographs shot by Rankin. Sleek and gentlemanly, the beautifully tailored clothes possessed a fresh new allure. Also on display from Milan's esteemed purveyor G. Lorenzi was an assortment of rare antique knives that had inspired the print patterns used throughout the collection.

Words: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

Roberto Cavalli's son Daniele is quickly shaping up to be one to watch. As creative director of menswear, Daniele brought a cutting-edge sense of modernity to his father's typically flashy fashion label. Set in the splendid garden of a 15th-century Milanese 'condominium', Cavalli presented this season's collection as an exhibit of photographs shot by Rankin. Sleek and gentlemanly, the beautifully tailored clothes possessed a fresh new allure. Also on display from Milan's esteemed purveyor G. Lorenzi was an assortment of rare antique knives that had inspired the print patterns used throughout the collection.

Words: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

Roberto Cavalli's son Daniele is quickly shaping up to be one to watch. As creative director of menswear, Daniele brought a cutting-edge sense of modernity to his father's typically flashy fashion label. Set in the splendid garden of a 15th-century Milanese 'condominium', Cavalli presented this season's collection as an exhibit of photographs shot by Rankin. Sleek and gentlemanly, the beautifully tailored clothes possessed a fresh new allure. Also on display from Milan's esteemed purveyor G. Lorenzi was an assortment of rare antique knives that had inspired the print patterns used throughout the collection.

Words: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

Roberto Cavalli's son Daniele is quickly shaping up to be one to watch. As creative director of menswear, Daniele brought a cutting-edge sense of modernity to his father's typically flashy fashion label. Set in the splendid garden of a 15th-century Milanese 'condominium', Cavalli presented this season's collection as an exhibit of photographs shot by Rankin. Sleek and gentlemanly, the beautifully tailored clothes possessed a fresh new allure. Also on display from Milan's esteemed purveyor G. Lorenzi was an assortment of rare antique knives that had inspired the print patterns used throughout the collection.

Words: J.J. Martin

Roberto Cavalli

Roberto Cavalli's son Daniele is quickly shaping up to be one to watch. As creative director of menswear, Daniele brought a cutting-edge sense of modernity to his father's typically flashy fashion label. Set in the splendid garden of a 15th-century Milanese 'condominium', Cavalli presented this season's collection as an exhibit of photographs shot by Rankin. Sleek and gentlemanly, the beautifully tailored clothes possessed a fresh new allure. Also on display from Milan's esteemed purveyor G. Lorenzi was an assortment of rare antique knives that had inspired the print patterns used throughout the collection.

Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

There are many designers in Milan who envision their man for next summer being swathed in layers of leather, but none who have done it so appropriately as Giorgio Armani. For his Emporio show, the Italian menswear maestro showed he knows a thing or two about how men can and should actually dress. His paper thin, uber-soft leathers came punctured with all manner of holes and net effects - design touches that not only lightened the clothes' weight, but allowed the body to breathe. Tank tops, trouser shorts and even cropped slim jackets with slightly flared backs were all made hot weather-appropriate, thanks to micro laser-cut holes. The digitized surface of the leathers was contrasted with the sleek look of suiting separates that came in light wools. Armani's new shape this season was a double-breasted jacket that closed up with a zip instead of buttons. It looked great on the casual looks, but was even better on the evening tuxedos worn with folded shirts and no ties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

There are many designers in Milan who envision their man for next summer being swathed in layers of leather, but none who have done it so appropriately as Giorgio Armani. For his Emporio show, the Italian menswear maestro showed he knows a thing or two about how men can and should actually dress. His paper thin, uber-soft leathers came punctured with all manner of holes and net effects - design touches that not only lightened the clothes' weight, but allowed the body to breathe. Tank tops, trouser shorts and even cropped slim jackets with slightly flared backs were all made hot weather-appropriate, thanks to micro laser-cut holes. The digitized surface of the leathers was contrasted with the sleek look of suiting separates that came in light wools. Armani's new shape this season was a double-breasted jacket that closed up with a zip instead of buttons. It looked great on the casual looks, but was even better on the evening tuxedos worn with folded shirts and no ties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

There are many designers in Milan who envision their man for next summer being swathed in layers of leather, but none who have done it so appropriately as Giorgio Armani. For his Emporio show, the Italian menswear maestro showed he knows a thing or two about how men can and should actually dress. His paper thin, uber-soft leathers came punctured with all manner of holes and net effects - design touches that not only lightened the clothes' weight, but allowed the body to breathe. Tank tops, trouser shorts and even cropped slim jackets with slightly flared backs were all made hot weather-appropriate, thanks to micro laser-cut holes. The digitized surface of the leathers was contrasted with the sleek look of suiting separates that came in light wools. Armani's new shape this season was a double-breasted jacket that closed up with a zip instead of buttons. It looked great on the casual looks, but was even better on the evening tuxedos worn with folded shirts and no ties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

There are many designers in Milan who envision their man for next summer being swathed in layers of leather, but none who have done it so appropriately as Giorgio Armani. For his Emporio show, the Italian menswear maestro showed he knows a thing or two about how men can and should actually dress. His paper thin, uber-soft leathers came punctured with all manner of holes and net effects - design touches that not only lightened the clothes' weight, but allowed the body to breathe. Tank tops, trouser shorts and even cropped slim jackets with slightly flared backs were all made hot weather-appropriate, thanks to micro laser-cut holes. The digitized surface of the leathers was contrasted with the sleek look of suiting separates that came in light wools. Armani's new shape this season was a double-breasted jacket that closed up with a zip instead of buttons. It looked great on the casual looks, but was even better on the evening tuxedos worn with folded shirts and no ties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Emporio Armani

There are many designers in Milan who envision their man for next summer being swathed in layers of leather, but none who have done it so appropriately as Giorgio Armani. For his Emporio show, the Italian menswear maestro showed he knows a thing or two about how men can and should actually dress. His paper thin, uber-soft leathers came punctured with all manner of holes and net effects - design touches that not only lightened the clothes' weight, but allowed the body to breathe. Tank tops, trouser shorts and even cropped slim jackets with slightly flared backs were all made hot weather-appropriate, thanks to micro laser-cut holes. The digitized surface of the leathers was contrasted with the sleek look of suiting separates that came in light wools. Armani's new shape this season was a double-breasted jacket that closed up with a zip instead of buttons. It looked great on the casual looks, but was even better on the evening tuxedos worn with folded shirts and no ties.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

Ports 1961 has been sizzling on the scene ever since hiring new creative director Ian Hylton. For summer, Hilton delivered another concise, well-edited collection of reductive, modern clothing. At the core were great looking separates - from crispy cotton trousers with wide-cuff cropped legs to argyle-front white leather bomber jackets. The styling hit just the right note with nerdy lab eyewear, produced in blonde tortoiseshell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

Ports 1961 has been sizzling on the scene ever since hiring new creative director Ian Hylton. For summer, Hilton delivered another concise, well-edited collection of reductive, modern clothing. At the core were great looking separates - from crispy cotton trousers with wide-cuff cropped legs to argyle-front white leather bomber jackets. The styling hit just the right note with nerdy lab eyewear, produced in blonde tortoiseshell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

Ports 1961 has been sizzling on the scene ever since hiring new creative director Ian Hylton. For summer, Hilton delivered another concise, well-edited collection of reductive, modern clothing. At the core were great looking separates - from crispy cotton trousers with wide-cuff cropped legs to argyle-front white leather bomber jackets. The styling hit just the right note with nerdy lab eyewear, produced in blonde tortoiseshell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

Ports 1961 has been sizzling on the scene ever since hiring new creative director Ian Hylton. For summer, Hilton delivered another concise, well-edited collection of reductive, modern clothing. At the core were great looking separates - from crispy cotton trousers with wide-cuff cropped legs to argyle-front white leather bomber jackets. The styling hit just the right note with nerdy lab eyewear, produced in blonde tortoiseshell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Ports 1961

Ports 1961 has been sizzling on the scene ever since hiring new creative director Ian Hylton. For summer, Hilton delivered another concise, well-edited collection of reductive, modern clothing. At the core were great looking separates - from crispy cotton trousers with wide-cuff cropped legs to argyle-front white leather bomber jackets. The styling hit just the right note with nerdy lab eyewear, produced in blonde tortoiseshell.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

Wild foliage from the tropics is shaping up to be catnip for designers this season, and the design theme proved no less alluring to Gucci's Frida Giannini. Using a twiggy, leafy pattern, Giannini plastered everything from sharp suits and casual shirts to slim trousers in the decorative floral fauna. The effect was exotic and romantic, not to mention optically punchy, especially when configured in neon pinks and oranges and worn in two-piece contrasting sets. Giannini balanced out the exuberance of this season's main conceit by incorporating it in her signature slim suits. The colour palette was striking this season, with opaque corals cosying up with dusty dark tobaccos and cornflower blue mingling with hard burgundy - adding a fashion edge to the knit sweaters, hooded anoraks and stiffened T-Shirts. Best of all was a butterscotch-coloured hooded sweatshirt in leather and neoprene.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

Wild foliage from the tropics is shaping up to be catnip for designers this season, and the design theme proved no less alluring to Gucci's Frida Giannini. Using a twiggy, leafy pattern, Giannini plastered everything from sharp suits and casual shirts to slim trousers in the decorative floral fauna. The effect was exotic and romantic, not to mention optically punchy, especially when configured in neon pinks and oranges and worn in two-piece contrasting sets. Giannini balanced out the exuberance of this season's main conceit by incorporating it in her signature slim suits. The colour palette was striking this season, with opaque corals cosying up with dusty dark tobaccos and cornflower blue mingling with hard burgundy - adding a fashion edge to the knit sweaters, hooded anoraks and stiffened T-Shirts. Best of all was a butterscotch-coloured hooded sweatshirt in leather and neoprene.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

Wild foliage from the tropics is shaping up to be catnip for designers this season, and the design theme proved no less alluring to Gucci's Frida Giannini. Using a twiggy, leafy pattern, Giannini plastered everything from sharp suits and casual shirts to slim trousers in the decorative floral fauna. The effect was exotic and romantic, not to mention optically punchy, especially when configured in neon pinks and oranges and worn in two-piece contrasting sets. Giannini balanced out the exuberance of this season's main conceit by incorporating it in her signature slim suits. The colour palette was striking this season, with opaque corals cosying up with dusty dark tobaccos and cornflower blue mingling with hard burgundy - adding a fashion edge to the knit sweaters, hooded anoraks and stiffened T-Shirts. Best of all was a butterscotch-coloured hooded sweatshirt in leather and neoprene.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

Wild foliage from the tropics is shaping up to be catnip for designers this season, and the design theme proved no less alluring to Gucci's Frida Giannini. Using a twiggy, leafy pattern, Giannini plastered everything from sharp suits and casual shirts to slim trousers in the decorative floral fauna. The effect was exotic and romantic, not to mention optically punchy, especially when configured in neon pinks and oranges and worn in two-piece contrasting sets. Giannini balanced out the exuberance of this season's main conceit by incorporating it in her signature slim suits. The colour palette was striking this season, with opaque corals cosying up with dusty dark tobaccos and cornflower blue mingling with hard burgundy - adding a fashion edge to the knit sweaters, hooded anoraks and stiffened T-Shirts. Best of all was a butterscotch-coloured hooded sweatshirt in leather and neoprene.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Gucci

Wild foliage from the tropics is shaping up to be catnip for designers this season, and the design theme proved no less alluring to Gucci's Frida Giannini. Using a twiggy, leafy pattern, Giannini plastered everything from sharp suits and casual shirts to slim trousers in the decorative floral fauna. The effect was exotic and romantic, not to mention optically punchy, especially when configured in neon pinks and oranges and worn in two-piece contrasting sets. Giannini balanced out the exuberance of this season's main conceit by incorporating it in her signature slim suits. The colour palette was striking this season, with opaque corals cosying up with dusty dark tobaccos and cornflower blue mingling with hard burgundy - adding a fashion edge to the knit sweaters, hooded anoraks and stiffened T-Shirts. Best of all was a butterscotch-coloured hooded sweatshirt in leather and neoprene.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Umit Benan

With all the chaos currently taking over Istanbul's Taksim Gezi Park, it is very appropriate that Turkish designer Umit Benan celebrated his own ethnic roots for his Spring collection. As is always the case, Benan's set was major. Transforming a small theatre in Milan into a dark, authentic Meyane - a men's only Turkish café - Benan's theatrical treats included low round metal cocktail tables stocked with wine and nuts, and four live musicians who dished out traditional beats on a Turkish goblet drum and long-necked mandolins. Despite the fun, dramatic settings and the cartoon moustache masks that the models wore, this collection didn't look showy at all. Benan served up tons of great suiting, cut from crisp cottons and plaids or striped wools. The silhouettes were clean and straightforward, even when Benan introduced some elements of his home country's typical dress. Turkish influences could be felt in long tunics worn under jackets and over slim trousers or collarless shirts.

Words: J.J. Martin

Umit Benan

With all the chaos currently taking over Istanbul's Taksim Gezi Park, it is very appropriate that Turkish designer Umit Benan celebrated his own ethnic roots for his Spring collection. As is always the case, Benan's set was major. Transforming a small theatre in Milan into a dark, authentic Meyane - a men's only Turkish café - Benan's theatrical treats included low round metal cocktail tables stocked with wine and nuts, and four live musicians who dished out traditional beats on a Turkish goblet drum and long-necked mandolins. Despite the fun, dramatic settings and the cartoon moustache masks that the models wore, this collection didn't look showy at all. Benan served up tons of great suiting, cut from crisp cottons and plaids or striped wools. The silhouettes were clean and straightforward, even when Benan introduced some elements of his home country's typical dress. Turkish influences could be felt in long tunics worn under jackets and over slim trousers or collarless shirts.

Words: J.J. Martin

Umit Benan

With all the chaos currently taking over Istanbul's Taksim Gezi Park, it is very appropriate that Turkish designer Umit Benan celebrated his own ethnic roots for his Spring collection. As is always the case, Benan's set was major. Transforming a small theatre in Milan into a dark, authentic Meyane - a men's only Turkish café - Benan's theatrical treats included low round metal cocktail tables stocked with wine and nuts, and four live musicians who dished out traditional beats on a Turkish goblet drum and long-necked mandolins. Despite the fun, dramatic settings and the cartoon moustache masks that the models wore, this collection didn't look showy at all. Benan served up tons of great suiting, cut from crisp cottons and plaids or striped wools. The silhouettes were clean and straightforward, even when Benan introduced some elements of his home country's typical dress. Turkish influences could be felt in long tunics worn under jackets and over slim trousers or collarless shirts.

Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Fendi dumped a sea of yellow sand across the floor of its Fondazione Pomodoro show space in honour of its desert-inspired Spring collection. The heat of the dunes wafted off the ground and onto the clothes, where cotton suits looked as if they were cooked to a crispy state and leather sweatshirts appeared to crackle into a million pieces. The silhouettes this season were lean and clean. Square work-wear jackets, narrow pants and slim blousons were free from all but the most essential artifice. The interest, though, came in the rich game of colours, where shades of sienna and brick were effortlessly thrown in with indigo and saffron. Hot yellow flashed on the inside of a putty-coloured slicker jacket, while a brick-toned trouser was paired with a fuchsia shirt and mud jacket.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Fendi dumped a sea of yellow sand across the floor of its Fondazione Pomodoro show space in honour of its desert-inspired Spring collection. The heat of the dunes wafted off the ground and onto the clothes, where cotton suits looked as if they were cooked to a crispy state and leather sweatshirts appeared to crackle into a million pieces. The silhouettes this season were lean and clean. Square work-wear jackets, narrow pants and slim blousons were free from all but the most essential artifice. The interest, though, came in the rich game of colours, where shades of sienna and brick were effortlessly thrown in with indigo and saffron. Hot yellow flashed on the inside of a putty-coloured slicker jacket, while a brick-toned trouser was paired with a fuchsia shirt and mud jacket.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Fendi dumped a sea of yellow sand across the floor of its Fondazione Pomodoro show space in honour of its desert-inspired Spring collection. The heat of the dunes wafted off the ground and onto the clothes, where cotton suits looked as if they were cooked to a crispy state and leather sweatshirts appeared to crackle into a million pieces. The silhouettes this season were lean and clean. Square work-wear jackets, narrow pants and slim blousons were free from all but the most essential artifice. The interest, though, came in the rich game of colours, where shades of sienna and brick were effortlessly thrown in with indigo and saffron. Hot yellow flashed on the inside of a putty-coloured slicker jacket, while a brick-toned trouser was paired with a fuchsia shirt and mud jacket.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Fendi dumped a sea of yellow sand across the floor of its Fondazione Pomodoro show space in honour of its desert-inspired Spring collection. The heat of the dunes wafted off the ground and onto the clothes, where cotton suits looked as if they were cooked to a crispy state and leather sweatshirts appeared to crackle into a million pieces. The silhouettes this season were lean and clean. Square work-wear jackets, narrow pants and slim blousons were free from all but the most essential artifice. The interest, though, came in the rich game of colours, where shades of sienna and brick were effortlessly thrown in with indigo and saffron. Hot yellow flashed on the inside of a putty-coloured slicker jacket, while a brick-toned trouser was paired with a fuchsia shirt and mud jacket.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Fendi

Fendi dumped a sea of yellow sand across the floor of its Fondazione Pomodoro show space in honour of its desert-inspired Spring collection. The heat of the dunes wafted off the ground and onto the clothes, where cotton suits looked as if they were cooked to a crispy state and leather sweatshirts appeared to crackle into a million pieces. The silhouettes this season were lean and clean. Square work-wear jackets, narrow pants and slim blousons were free from all but the most essential artifice. The interest, though, came in the rich game of colours, where shades of sienna and brick were effortlessly thrown in with indigo and saffron. Hot yellow flashed on the inside of a putty-coloured slicker jacket, while a brick-toned trouser was paired with a fuchsia shirt and mud jacket.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Brioni

It's all about silk this season at Brioni, where creative director Brendan Mullane tapped an artisanal tie maker in Lake Como to produce extra bolts of fabric for his menswear collection. From traditional suits to trench coats and slim bombers, everything was awash with a subtle grey sheen, thanks to the beautiful micro-checked compact silk.

Words: J.J. Martin

Brioni

It's all about silk this season at Brioni, where creative director Brendan Mullane tapped an artisanal tie maker in Lake Como to produce extra bolts of fabric for his menswear collection. From traditional suits to trench coats and slim bombers, everything was awash with a subtle grey sheen, thanks to the beautiful micro-checked compact silk.

Words: J.J. Martin

Brioni

It's all about silk this season at Brioni, where creative director Brendan Mullane tapped an artisanal tie maker in Lake Como to produce extra bolts of fabric for his menswear collection. From traditional suits to trench coats and slim bombers, everything was awash with a subtle grey sheen, thanks to the beautiful micro-checked compact silk.

Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Mixing and matching your suit wardrobe is a dressing phenomenon that the Italians do flawlessly. Giorgio Armani embraced this local tradition for Spring, opening up his show with a great line-up of soft navy separates cut close to the body. The jackets, trousers and shirts all came from the same family of navy blue - Mr Armani's personal favourite colour - but had different intensities in hue and incorporated woven patterns that emerged and retreated in a subtle way. When mixed and matched, the effect was a new cool easy look for Spring that still looked buttoned up without being stiff. The other top moment of the collection came at the end, when Armani's impeccable formal suits - a mainstay of this Italian luxury brand - got jazzed up with the new woven canvas wing tip shoe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Mixing and matching your suit wardrobe is a dressing phenomenon that the Italians do flawlessly. Giorgio Armani embraced this local tradition for Spring, opening up his show with a great line-up of soft navy separates cut close to the body. The jackets, trousers and shirts all came from the same family of navy blue - Mr Armani's personal favourite colour - but had different intensities in hue and incorporated woven patterns that emerged and retreated in a subtle way. When mixed and matched, the effect was a new cool easy look for Spring that still looked buttoned up without being stiff. The other top moment of the collection came at the end, when Armani's impeccable formal suits - a mainstay of this Italian luxury brand - got jazzed up with the new woven canvas wing tip shoe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Mixing and matching your suit wardrobe is a dressing phenomenon that the Italians do flawlessly. Giorgio Armani embraced this local tradition for Spring, opening up his show with a great line-up of soft navy separates cut close to the body. The jackets, trousers and shirts all came from the same family of navy blue - Mr Armani's personal favourite colour - but had different intensities in hue and incorporated woven patterns that emerged and retreated in a subtle way. When mixed and matched, the effect was a new cool easy look for Spring that still looked buttoned up without being stiff. The other top moment of the collection came at the end, when Armani's impeccable formal suits - a mainstay of this Italian luxury brand - got jazzed up with the new woven canvas wing tip shoe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Mixing and matching your suit wardrobe is a dressing phenomenon that the Italians do flawlessly. Giorgio Armani embraced this local tradition for Spring, opening up his show with a great line-up of soft navy separates cut close to the body. The jackets, trousers and shirts all came from the same family of navy blue - Mr Armani's personal favourite colour - but had different intensities in hue and incorporated woven patterns that emerged and retreated in a subtle way. When mixed and matched, the effect was a new cool easy look for Spring that still looked buttoned up without being stiff. The other top moment of the collection came at the end, when Armani's impeccable formal suits - a mainstay of this Italian luxury brand - got jazzed up with the new woven canvas wing tip shoe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Giorgio Armani

Mixing and matching your suit wardrobe is a dressing phenomenon that the Italians do flawlessly. Giorgio Armani embraced this local tradition for Spring, opening up his show with a great line-up of soft navy separates cut close to the body. The jackets, trousers and shirts all came from the same family of navy blue - Mr Armani's personal favourite colour - but had different intensities in hue and incorporated woven patterns that emerged and retreated in a subtle way. When mixed and matched, the effect was a new cool easy look for Spring that still looked buttoned up without being stiff. The other top moment of the collection came at the end, when Armani's impeccable formal suits - a mainstay of this Italian luxury brand - got jazzed up with the new woven canvas wing tip shoe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Z Zegna

The crisscross configuration of the runway and seating space at the Z Zegna show was not only a visual treat, but also a clue to the clothes designed by creative director Paul Surridge. He looked to Sol LeWitt this season, borrowing from the artists' preferred geometrics and applying the aesthetic as 3D and flat surface treatment on sturdy cotton daywear. The same patterns could be found on the show space's walls as well as the runway. But the crisscross underfoot also demonstrated another crossover - that of sportswear and more sartorially based tailoring. The concept was evident from the first look - a sharp evening jacket with a lovely satin shawl collar that was paired with a gossamer knit sweater and silk taffeta trousers, puffed with volume for a sporty techno feel. Along the way, Surridge played with Zegna's awesome arsenal of fabrics, dreaming up technical wools in grape and green, high performance mohair blends and jacquard on cotton and silk. There was also a great soft colour moment where extremely blush-like pinks, the creamiest of greys and the most buttery of creams made their way onto uneven layers of jumpers, jackets and shirting and paired with open-toe leather sandals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Z Zegna

The crisscross configuration of the runway and seating space at the Z Zegna show was not only a visual treat, but also a clue to the clothes designed by creative director Paul Surridge. He looked to Sol LeWitt this season, borrowing from the artists' preferred geometrics and applying the aesthetic as 3D and flat surface treatment on sturdy cotton daywear. The same patterns could be found on the show space's walls as well as the runway. But the crisscross underfoot also demonstrated another crossover - that of sportswear and more sartorially based tailoring. The concept was evident from the first look - a sharp evening jacket with a lovely satin shawl collar that was paired with a gossamer knit sweater and silk taffeta trousers, puffed with volume for a sporty techno feel. Along the way, Surridge played with Zegna's awesome arsenal of fabrics, dreaming up technical wools in grape and green, high performance mohair blends and jacquard on cotton and silk. There was also a great soft colour moment where extremely blush-like pinks, the creamiest of greys and the most buttery of creams made their way onto uneven layers of jumpers, jackets and shirting and paired with open-toe leather sandals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Z Zegna

The crisscross configuration of the runway and seating space at the Z Zegna show was not only a visual treat, but also a clue to the clothes designed by creative director Paul Surridge. He looked to Sol LeWitt this season, borrowing from the artists' preferred geometrics and applying the aesthetic as 3D and flat surface treatment on sturdy cotton daywear. The same patterns could be found on the show space's walls as well as the runway. But the crisscross underfoot also demonstrated another crossover - that of sportswear and more sartorially based tailoring. The concept was evident from the first look - a sharp evening jacket with a lovely satin shawl collar that was paired with a gossamer knit sweater and silk taffeta trousers, puffed with volume for a sporty techno feel. Along the way, Surridge played with Zegna's awesome arsenal of fabrics, dreaming up technical wools in grape and green, high performance mohair blends and jacquard on cotton and silk. There was also a great soft colour moment where extremely blush-like pinks, the creamiest of greys and the most buttery of creams made their way onto uneven layers of jumpers, jackets and shirting and paired with open-toe leather sandals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Z Zegna

The crisscross configuration of the runway and seating space at the Z Zegna show was not only a visual treat, but also a clue to the clothes designed by creative director Paul Surridge. He looked to Sol LeWitt this season, borrowing from the artists' preferred geometrics and applying the aesthetic as 3D and flat surface treatment on sturdy cotton daywear. The same patterns could be found on the show space's walls as well as the runway. But the crisscross underfoot also demonstrated another crossover - that of sportswear and more sartorially based tailoring. The concept was evident from the first look - a sharp evening jacket with a lovely satin shawl collar that was paired with a gossamer knit sweater and silk taffeta trousers, puffed with volume for a sporty techno feel. Along the way, Surridge played with Zegna's awesome arsenal of fabrics, dreaming up technical wools in grape and green, high performance mohair blends and jacquard on cotton and silk. There was also a great soft colour moment where extremely blush-like pinks, the creamiest of greys and the most buttery of creams made their way onto uneven layers of jumpers, jackets and shirting and paired with open-toe leather sandals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Z Zegna

The crisscross configuration of the runway and seating space at the Z Zegna show was not only a visual treat, but also a clue to the clothes designed by creative director Paul Surridge. He looked to Sol LeWitt this season, borrowing from the artists' preferred geometrics and applying the aesthetic as 3D and flat surface treatment on sturdy cotton daywear. The same patterns could be found on the show space's walls as well as the runway. But the crisscross underfoot also demonstrated another crossover - that of sportswear and more sartorially based tailoring. The concept was evident from the first look - a sharp evening jacket with a lovely satin shawl collar that was paired with a gossamer knit sweater and silk taffeta trousers, puffed with volume for a sporty techno feel. Along the way, Surridge played with Zegna's awesome arsenal of fabrics, dreaming up technical wools in grape and green, high performance mohair blends and jacquard on cotton and silk. There was also a great soft colour moment where extremely blush-like pinks, the creamiest of greys and the most buttery of creams made their way onto uneven layers of jumpers, jackets and shirting and paired with open-toe leather sandals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Jil Sander

Last season, Jil Sander introduced a wide-leg Bermuda short as the new essential bottom half in her reductive menswear wardrobe. Now that the rest of the fashion world has followed her lead, the designer has cut her short even longer and wider - so much so that it now appears like a pleated culotte or even a woman’s A-line skirt. But Sander avoids the pitfalls of dressing men too much like women with her knife-sharp cutting. Boxy button-down shirts came with scalpel-like collars, rectangular jackets were cut with a slight curved back and three-quarter-length coats were so dense they looked like they were sculpted from stone. The blouson jacket - a hybrid shirt-jacket with an elastic waist – is another Sander signature that is quickly gaining traction in the rest of the world’s trend radar. Sander washed hers with new borders of neon watermelon or tangerine—a splash of colour that quickly grew to a full pool of hue on her extra-wide Bermuda short suits.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Words: J.J. Martin


Twitter feed



Past shows


Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Google Plus Follow us on Tumblr