Gucci

The first clue to Frida Giannini's new pared-down aesthetic this season came in the form of her usual Milan show space, which had been coated in an unusually brilliant white. The clean walls and runway underfoot made for a rousing canvas from which her sharply drawn, reductivist collection popped. Giannini's silhouettes were borrowed liberally from the 1960s and centered around Mod-like skinny pants (including a jean) and mini skirt dresses with sharp A-line cuts. The latter were beautifully rendered in dusty shades of sage, mustard and rose with sleeveless leather panelled tops and matching crepe skirts. The new cropped lengths allowed Giannini to play with low, block-heeled knee boots brandished with Gucci's famous horsebit hardware, a metal game that was later played across dress fronts. The boots, like the rest of the breezy sportswear inflected collection, were made not just for walking but also conveniently for sitting, standing, running, dancing and all the other activity sensible women do every day. It's refreshing to see Giannini go back to her levelheaded, feminine roots - to the simplicity, in fact, of her very first collections for Gucci. A clean, no-nonsense womanly aesthetic suits this designer. It allows for the occasional frippery, like Mongolian fur, shaggy goat hair and shaved mink, all in shades of powder pink, to be swallowed as easily and pleasantly as a gumdrop.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Gucci

The first clue to Frida Giannini's new pared-down aesthetic this season came in the form of her usual Milan show space, which had been coated in an unusually brilliant white. The clean walls and runway underfoot made for a rousing canvas from which her sharply drawn, reductivist collection popped. Giannini's silhouettes were borrowed liberally from the 1960s and centered around Mod-like skinny pants (including a jean) and mini skirt dresses with sharp A-line cuts. The latter were beautifully rendered in dusty shades of sage, mustard and rose with sleeveless leather panelled tops and matching crepe skirts. The new cropped lengths allowed Giannini to play with low, block-heeled knee boots brandished with Gucci's famous horsebit hardware, a metal game that was later played across dress fronts. The boots, like the rest of the breezy sportswear inflected collection, were made not just for walking but also conveniently for sitting, standing, running, dancing and all the other activity sensible women do every day. It's refreshing to see Giannini go back to her levelheaded, feminine roots - to the simplicity, in fact, of her very first collections for Gucci. A clean, no-nonsense womanly aesthetic suits this designer. It allows for the occasional frippery, like Mongolian fur, shaggy goat hair and shaved mink, all in shades of powder pink, to be swallowed as easily and pleasantly as a gumdrop.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Gucci

The first clue to Frida Giannini's new pared-down aesthetic this season came in the form of her usual Milan show space, which had been coated in an unusually brilliant white. The clean walls and runway underfoot made for a rousing canvas from which her sharply drawn, reductivist collection popped. Giannini's silhouettes were borrowed liberally from the 1960s and centered around Mod-like skinny pants (including a jean) and mini skirt dresses with sharp A-line cuts. The latter were beautifully rendered in dusty shades of sage, mustard and rose with sleeveless leather panelled tops and matching crepe skirts. The new cropped lengths allowed Giannini to play with low, block-heeled knee boots brandished with Gucci's famous horsebit hardware, a metal game that was later played across dress fronts. The boots, like the rest of the breezy sportswear inflected collection, were made not just for walking but also conveniently for sitting, standing, running, dancing and all the other activity sensible women do every day. It's refreshing to see Giannini go back to her levelheaded, feminine roots - to the simplicity, in fact, of her very first collections for Gucci. A clean, no-nonsense womanly aesthetic suits this designer. It allows for the occasional frippery, like Mongolian fur, shaggy goat hair and shaved mink, all in shades of powder pink, to be swallowed as easily and pleasantly as a gumdrop.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Gucci

The first clue to Frida Giannini's new pared-down aesthetic this season came in the form of her usual Milan show space, which had been coated in an unusually brilliant white. The clean walls and runway underfoot made for a rousing canvas from which her sharply drawn, reductivist collection popped. Giannini's silhouettes were borrowed liberally from the 1960s and centered around Mod-like skinny pants (including a jean) and mini skirt dresses with sharp A-line cuts. The latter were beautifully rendered in dusty shades of sage, mustard and rose with sleeveless leather panelled tops and matching crepe skirts. The new cropped lengths allowed Giannini to play with low, block-heeled knee boots brandished with Gucci's famous horsebit hardware, a metal game that was later played across dress fronts. The boots, like the rest of the breezy sportswear inflected collection, were made not just for walking but also conveniently for sitting, standing, running, dancing and all the other activity sensible women do every day. It's refreshing to see Giannini go back to her levelheaded, feminine roots - to the simplicity, in fact, of her very first collections for Gucci. A clean, no-nonsense womanly aesthetic suits this designer. It allows for the occasional frippery, like Mongolian fur, shaggy goat hair and shaved mink, all in shades of powder pink, to be swallowed as easily and pleasantly as a gumdrop.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Gucci

The first clue to Frida Giannini's new pared-down aesthetic this season came in the form of her usual Milan show space, which had been coated in an unusually brilliant white. The clean walls and runway underfoot made for a rousing canvas from which her sharply drawn, reductivist collection popped. Giannini's silhouettes were borrowed liberally from the 1960s and centered around Mod-like skinny pants (including a jean) and mini skirt dresses with sharp A-line cuts. The latter were beautifully rendered in dusty shades of sage, mustard and rose with sleeveless leather panelled tops and matching crepe skirts. The new cropped lengths allowed Giannini to play with low, block-heeled knee boots brandished with Gucci's famous horsebit hardware, a metal game that was later played across dress fronts. The boots, like the rest of the breezy sportswear inflected collection, were made not just for walking but also conveniently for sitting, standing, running, dancing and all the other activity sensible women do every day. It's refreshing to see Giannini go back to her levelheaded, feminine roots - to the simplicity, in fact, of her very first collections for Gucci. A clean, no-nonsense womanly aesthetic suits this designer. It allows for the occasional frippery, like Mongolian fur, shaggy goat hair and shaved mink, all in shades of powder pink, to be swallowed as easily and pleasantly as a gumdrop.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

No. 21

At first glance, the micro sequins that were ablaze in iridescent turquoise and cherry red on the No. 21 runway seemed to shout 'Disco Ball' in capital letters. But Alessandro Dell'Acqua's collection was light years away from any cheesy light show-esque dance floor. Dell'Acqua sits firmly in the fashion school of thought that teams the girlish with the boyish, the decorative with the sober, and the kooky with the calm. It's the fashion equivalent of topping a slice of multi-grain whole wheat bread with chocolate frosting and devouring it all in one bite. This season he tempered the eye-busting bling with homely flat shoes and camel hair sweaters that were as cosy as anything your grandpa used to wear. Cut into mannish - and sometimes shapeless - silhouettes, all of the fire that could have potentially exploded from those glittering mini crystals was promptly extinguished. What was left was a runway full of covetable pieces to fill a woman's wardrobe next fall and a modern vision of magically quiet beauty.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

No. 21

At first glance, the micro sequins that were ablaze in iridescent turquoise and cherry red on the No. 21 runway seemed to shout 'Disco Ball' in capital letters. But Alessandro Dell'Acqua's collection was light years away from any cheesy light show-esque dance floor. Dell'Acqua sits firmly in the fashion school of thought that teams the girlish with the boyish, the decorative with the sober, and the kooky with the calm. It's the fashion equivalent of topping a slice of multi-grain whole wheat bread with chocolate frosting and devouring it all in one bite. This season he tempered the eye-busting bling with homely flat shoes and camel hair sweaters that were as cosy as anything your grandpa used to wear. Cut into mannish - and sometimes shapeless - silhouettes, all of the fire that could have potentially exploded from those glittering mini crystals was promptly extinguished. What was left was a runway full of covetable pieces to fill a woman's wardrobe next fall and a modern vision of magically quiet beauty.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

No. 21

At first glance, the micro sequins that were ablaze in iridescent turquoise and cherry red on the No. 21 runway seemed to shout 'Disco Ball' in capital letters. But Alessandro Dell'Acqua's collection was light years away from any cheesy light show-esque dance floor. Dell'Acqua sits firmly in the fashion school of thought that teams the girlish with the boyish, the decorative with the sober, and the kooky with the calm. It's the fashion equivalent of topping a slice of multi-grain whole wheat bread with chocolate frosting and devouring it all in one bite. This season he tempered the eye-busting bling with homely flat shoes and camel hair sweaters that were as cosy as anything your grandpa used to wear. Cut into mannish - and sometimes shapeless - silhouettes, all of the fire that could have potentially exploded from those glittering mini crystals was promptly extinguished. What was left was a runway full of covetable pieces to fill a woman's wardrobe next fall and a modern vision of magically quiet beauty.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

No. 21

At first glance, the micro sequins that were ablaze in iridescent turquoise and cherry red on the No. 21 runway seemed to shout 'Disco Ball' in capital letters. But Alessandro Dell'Acqua's collection was light years away from any cheesy light show-esque dance floor. Dell'Acqua sits firmly in the fashion school of thought that teams the girlish with the boyish, the decorative with the sober, and the kooky with the calm. It's the fashion equivalent of topping a slice of multi-grain whole wheat bread with chocolate frosting and devouring it all in one bite. This season he tempered the eye-busting bling with homely flat shoes and camel hair sweaters that were as cosy as anything your grandpa used to wear. Cut into mannish - and sometimes shapeless - silhouettes, all of the fire that could have potentially exploded from those glittering mini crystals was promptly extinguished. What was left was a runway full of covetable pieces to fill a woman's wardrobe next fall and a modern vision of magically quiet beauty.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

No. 21

At first glance, the micro sequins that were ablaze in iridescent turquoise and cherry red on the No. 21 runway seemed to shout 'Disco Ball' in capital letters. But Alessandro Dell'Acqua's collection was light years away from any cheesy light show-esque dance floor. Dell'Acqua sits firmly in the fashion school of thought that teams the girlish with the boyish, the decorative with the sober, and the kooky with the calm. It's the fashion equivalent of topping a slice of multi-grain whole wheat bread with chocolate frosting and devouring it all in one bite. This season he tempered the eye-busting bling with homely flat shoes and camel hair sweaters that were as cosy as anything your grandpa used to wear. Cut into mannish - and sometimes shapeless - silhouettes, all of the fire that could have potentially exploded from those glittering mini crystals was promptly extinguished. What was left was a runway full of covetable pieces to fill a woman's wardrobe next fall and a modern vision of magically quiet beauty.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Max Mara

Max Mara is one of those trusted Italian brands that never lets us down, nor the teeming throng of shoppers that pass through its 2,300 stores each year. With deep roots in no-nonsense outerwear, we always get a perfectly cut camel hair coat, or a well-proportioned tweed tailleur. This season we got all that plus a whole lot more as Max Mara strode confidently down a route filled with unexpected twists and applauding turns.The collection was based on the brand's trusted wools, tweeds and cashmere but new voluminous, elongated silhouettes and patchwork constructions shifted the eye completely. The fronts of cocoon-like coats, wool column skirts and mohair sweaters, for example, were conceived in mannish wools, while the backs revealed gilded gold crocodile embossed panels. The mix of opulence and sobriety was perfectly judged and was threaded throughout the collection in low-heeled gold booties and collars on coats. There was plenty of covetable outerwear here, especially the wool panelled puffer coats and mushrooming shaved shearling coats printed in two-tone check patterns. Max Mara completed this beautifully conceived collection with the new evening suit cut from ultra-fine wools on the front and daring edgy PVC from behind.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Max Mara

Max Mara is one of those trusted Italian brands that never lets us down, nor the teeming throng of shoppers that pass through its 2,300 stores each year. With deep roots in no-nonsense outerwear, we always get a perfectly cut camel hair coat, or a well-proportioned tweed tailleur. This season we got all that plus a whole lot more as Max Mara strode confidently down a route filled with unexpected twists and applauding turns.The collection was based on the brand's trusted wools, tweeds and cashmere but new voluminous, elongated silhouettes and patchwork constructions shifted the eye completely. The fronts of cocoon-like coats, wool column skirts and mohair sweaters, for example, were conceived in mannish wools, while the backs revealed gilded gold crocodile embossed panels. The mix of opulence and sobriety was perfectly judged and was threaded throughout the collection in low-heeled gold booties and collars on coats. There was plenty of covetable outerwear here, especially the wool panelled puffer coats and mushrooming shaved shearling coats printed in two-tone check patterns. Max Mara completed this beautifully conceived collection with the new evening suit cut from ultra-fine wools on the front and daring edgy PVC from behind.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Max Mara

Max Mara is one of those trusted Italian brands that never lets us down, nor the teeming throng of shoppers that pass through its 2,300 stores each year. With deep roots in no-nonsense outerwear, we always get a perfectly cut camel hair coat, or a well-proportioned tweed tailleur. This season we got all that plus a whole lot more as Max Mara strode confidently down a route filled with unexpected twists and applauding turns.The collection was based on the brand's trusted wools, tweeds and cashmere but new voluminous, elongated silhouettes and patchwork constructions shifted the eye completely. The fronts of cocoon-like coats, wool column skirts and mohair sweaters, for example, were conceived in mannish wools, while the backs revealed gilded gold crocodile embossed panels. The mix of opulence and sobriety was perfectly judged and was threaded throughout the collection in low-heeled gold booties and collars on coats. There was plenty of covetable outerwear here, especially the wool panelled puffer coats and mushrooming shaved shearling coats printed in two-tone check patterns. Max Mara completed this beautifully conceived collection with the new evening suit cut from ultra-fine wools on the front and daring edgy PVC from behind.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Max Mara

Max Mara is one of those trusted Italian brands that never lets us down, nor the teeming throng of shoppers that pass through its 2,300 stores each year. With deep roots in no-nonsense outerwear, we always get a perfectly cut camel hair coat, or a well-proportioned tweed tailleur. This season we got all that plus a whole lot more as Max Mara strode confidently down a route filled with unexpected twists and applauding turns.The collection was based on the brand's trusted wools, tweeds and cashmere but new voluminous, elongated silhouettes and patchwork constructions shifted the eye completely. The fronts of cocoon-like coats, wool column skirts and mohair sweaters, for example, were conceived in mannish wools, while the backs revealed gilded gold crocodile embossed panels. The mix of opulence and sobriety was perfectly judged and was threaded throughout the collection in low-heeled gold booties and collars on coats. There was plenty of covetable outerwear here, especially the wool panelled puffer coats and mushrooming shaved shearling coats printed in two-tone check patterns. Max Mara completed this beautifully conceived collection with the new evening suit cut from ultra-fine wools on the front and daring edgy PVC from behind.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Max Mara

Max Mara is one of those trusted Italian brands that never lets us down, nor the teeming throng of shoppers that pass through its 2,300 stores each year. With deep roots in no-nonsense outerwear, we always get a perfectly cut camel hair coat, or a well-proportioned tweed tailleur. This season we got all that plus a whole lot more as Max Mara strode confidently down a route filled with unexpected twists and applauding turns.The collection was based on the brand's trusted wools, tweeds and cashmere but new voluminous, elongated silhouettes and patchwork constructions shifted the eye completely. The fronts of cocoon-like coats, wool column skirts and mohair sweaters, for example, were conceived in mannish wools, while the backs revealed gilded gold crocodile embossed panels. The mix of opulence and sobriety was perfectly judged and was threaded throughout the collection in low-heeled gold booties and collars on coats. There was plenty of covetable outerwear here, especially the wool panelled puffer coats and mushrooming shaved shearling coats printed in two-tone check patterns. Max Mara completed this beautifully conceived collection with the new evening suit cut from ultra-fine wools on the front and daring edgy PVC from behind.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Fendi

The sheer amount of power that reverberates off a Fendi show runway is increasingly making it one of the most seismic shows in Milan. It is almost impossible, however, to digest the depth and multi-layered creativity from one's show seat. This season, Fendi had some help broadcasting its message with a series of flying drones - illuminated disks that zoomed across the show space over guests' heads and that transmitted real-time video to the folks back home in front of their computers. What could have been a gimmicky move elsewhere turned out to be a slick, futuristic act in Fendi's case. It also happened to be perfectly in step with a fashion collection that was, pardon the pun, out of this world. From the collaged pieces of fur that were assembled like a puzzle over perforated leather coats to the rock crystals that scintillated like stars in a midnight sky of shaved mink, each look in this collection was an example of the phenomenal workmanship that only the Italians can muster. Unusual effects were everywhere - from foxy mohawk trims on wool dresses to ladylike orchid corsages that snaked across fur coats. But what was most striking was the way creative director Karl Lagerfeld can keep his sense of humour. We loved the fur-helmeted Cara Delevingne who opened the show effortlessly dangling a shaggy handbag in the shape of the designer's unmistakable face.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Fendi

The sheer amount of power that reverberates off a Fendi show runway is increasingly making it one of the most seismic shows in Milan. It is almost impossible, however, to digest the depth and multi-layered creativity from one's show seat. This season, Fendi had some help broadcasting its message with a series of flying drones - illuminated disks that zoomed across the show space over guests' heads and that transmitted real-time video to the folks back home in front of their computers. What could have been a gimmicky move elsewhere turned out to be a slick, futuristic act in Fendi's case. It also happened to be perfectly in step with a fashion collection that was, pardon the pun, out of this world. From the collaged pieces of fur that were assembled like a puzzle over perforated leather coats to the rock crystals that scintillated like stars in a midnight sky of shaved mink, each look in this collection was an example of the phenomenal workmanship that only the Italians can muster. Unusual effects were everywhere - from foxy mohawk trims on wool dresses to ladylike orchid corsages that snaked across fur coats. But what was most striking was the way creative director Karl Lagerfeld can keep his sense of humour. We loved the fur-helmeted Cara Delevingne who opened the show effortlessly dangling a shaggy handbag in the shape of the designer's unmistakable face.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Fendi

The sheer amount of power that reverberates off a Fendi show runway is increasingly making it one of the most seismic shows in Milan. It is almost impossible, however, to digest the depth and multi-layered creativity from one's show seat. This season, Fendi had some help broadcasting its message with a series of flying drones - illuminated disks that zoomed across the show space over guests' heads and that transmitted real-time video to the folks back home in front of their computers. What could have been a gimmicky move elsewhere turned out to be a slick, futuristic act in Fendi's case. It also happened to be perfectly in step with a fashion collection that was, pardon the pun, out of this world. From the collaged pieces of fur that were assembled like a puzzle over perforated leather coats to the rock crystals that scintillated like stars in a midnight sky of shaved mink, each look in this collection was an example of the phenomenal workmanship that only the Italians can muster. Unusual effects were everywhere - from foxy mohawk trims on wool dresses to ladylike orchid corsages that snaked across fur coats. But what was most striking was the way creative director Karl Lagerfeld can keep his sense of humour. We loved the fur-helmeted Cara Delevingne who opened the show effortlessly dangling a shaggy handbag in the shape of the designer's unmistakable face.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Fendi

The sheer amount of power that reverberates off a Fendi show runway is increasingly making it one of the most seismic shows in Milan. It is almost impossible, however, to digest the depth and multi-layered creativity from one's show seat. This season, Fendi had some help broadcasting its message with a series of flying drones - illuminated disks that zoomed across the show space over guests' heads and that transmitted real-time video to the folks back home in front of their computers. What could have been a gimmicky move elsewhere turned out to be a slick, futuristic act in Fendi's case. It also happened to be perfectly in step with a fashion collection that was, pardon the pun, out of this world. From the collaged pieces of fur that were assembled like a puzzle over perforated leather coats to the rock crystals that scintillated like stars in a midnight sky of shaved mink, each look in this collection was an example of the phenomenal workmanship that only the Italians can muster. Unusual effects were everywhere - from foxy mohawk trims on wool dresses to ladylike orchid corsages that snaked across fur coats. But what was most striking was the way creative director Karl Lagerfeld can keep his sense of humour. We loved the fur-helmeted Cara Delevingne who opened the show effortlessly dangling a shaggy handbag in the shape of the designer's unmistakable face.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Fendi

The sheer amount of power that reverberates off a Fendi show runway is increasingly making it one of the most seismic shows in Milan. It is almost impossible, however, to digest the depth and multi-layered creativity from one's show seat. This season, Fendi had some help broadcasting its message with a series of flying drones - illuminated disks that zoomed across the show space over guests' heads and that transmitted real-time video to the folks back home in front of their computers. What could have been a gimmicky move elsewhere turned out to be a slick, futuristic act in Fendi's case. It also happened to be perfectly in step with a fashion collection that was, pardon the pun, out of this world. From the collaged pieces of fur that were assembled like a puzzle over perforated leather coats to the rock crystals that scintillated like stars in a midnight sky of shaved mink, each look in this collection was an example of the phenomenal workmanship that only the Italians can muster. Unusual effects were everywhere - from foxy mohawk trims on wool dresses to ladylike orchid corsages that snaked across fur coats. But what was most striking was the way creative director Karl Lagerfeld can keep his sense of humour. We loved the fur-helmeted Cara Delevingne who opened the show effortlessly dangling a shaggy handbag in the shape of the designer's unmistakable face.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prada

Miuccia Prada packaged her womenswear show space in Milan in the same heavy-duty mover's felt we saw for her menswear show one month ago. Oddly enough, the power tool vibe had more to do with the girls than the boys this season, as Prada worked her women's outerwear into the proportions of giant cardboard moving boxes. Although they were cut like a 2-tonne container, these coats built slowly and effectively into decorative, even feminine, pieces. Prada's main design conceit was her magnificent colour blocking, which she achieved on stiff wool coats trimmed in contrast taping. From there, both the materials and the décor went into happy overdrive, moving to black and gold shearling trimmed in colourful cherry, lemon and rust curled lambswool. The effect - when paired with monochrome neck scarves, white plasticised wedge boots, and flat leather handbags - looked artfully assembled and brought a new graphic quality we have yet to see in burly ranger coats. Underneath all the beef were wispy 1930s inflected dresses cut from slinky silk satin or completely transparent chiffon. It is true that many designers have tackled the sheer story over the last three seasons but none have done it like Prada, who offered hers up in a circular silhouette, trimmed with tufts of feather and fur. That, coupled with the new triangular piping on printed dresses and matching criss-cross straps on single-sole wedge pumps, gave us plenty of newness to dwell on.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prada

Miuccia Prada packaged her womenswear show space in Milan in the same heavy-duty mover's felt we saw for her menswear show one month ago. Oddly enough, the power tool vibe had more to do with the girls than the boys this season, as Prada worked her women's outerwear into the proportions of giant cardboard moving boxes. Although they were cut like a 2-tonne container, these coats built slowly and effectively into decorative, even feminine, pieces. Prada's main design conceit was her magnificent colour blocking, which she achieved on stiff wool coats trimmed in contrast taping. From there, both the materials and the décor went into happy overdrive, moving to black and gold shearling trimmed in colourful cherry, lemon and rust curled lambswool. The effect - when paired with monochrome neck scarves, white plasticised wedge boots, and flat leather handbags - looked artfully assembled and brought a new graphic quality we have yet to see in burly ranger coats. Underneath all the beef were wispy 1930s inflected dresses cut from slinky silk satin or completely transparent chiffon. It is true that many designers have tackled the sheer story over the last three seasons but none have done it like Prada, who offered hers up in a circular silhouette, trimmed with tufts of feather and fur. That, coupled with the new triangular piping on printed dresses and matching criss-cross straps on single-sole wedge pumps, gave us plenty of newness to dwell on.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prada

Miuccia Prada packaged her womenswear show space in Milan in the same heavy-duty mover's felt we saw for her menswear show one month ago. Oddly enough, the power tool vibe had more to do with the girls than the boys this season, as Prada worked her women's outerwear into the proportions of giant cardboard moving boxes. Although they were cut like a 2-tonne container, these coats built slowly and effectively into decorative, even feminine, pieces. Prada's main design conceit was her magnificent colour blocking, which she achieved on stiff wool coats trimmed in contrast taping. From there, both the materials and the décor went into happy overdrive, moving to black and gold shearling trimmed in colourful cherry, lemon and rust curled lambswool. The effect - when paired with monochrome neck scarves, white plasticised wedge boots, and flat leather handbags - looked artfully assembled and brought a new graphic quality we have yet to see in burly ranger coats. Underneath all the beef were wispy 1930s inflected dresses cut from slinky silk satin or completely transparent chiffon. It is true that many designers have tackled the sheer story over the last three seasons but none have done it like Prada, who offered hers up in a circular silhouette, trimmed with tufts of feather and fur. That, coupled with the new triangular piping on printed dresses and matching criss-cross straps on single-sole wedge pumps, gave us plenty of newness to dwell on.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prada

Miuccia Prada packaged her womenswear show space in Milan in the same heavy-duty mover's felt we saw for her menswear show one month ago. Oddly enough, the power tool vibe had more to do with the girls than the boys this season, as Prada worked her women's outerwear into the proportions of giant cardboard moving boxes. Although they were cut like a 2-tonne container, these coats built slowly and effectively into decorative, even feminine, pieces. Prada's main design conceit was her magnificent colour blocking, which she achieved on stiff wool coats trimmed in contrast taping. From there, both the materials and the décor went into happy overdrive, moving to black and gold shearling trimmed in colourful cherry, lemon and rust curled lambswool. The effect - when paired with monochrome neck scarves, white plasticised wedge boots, and flat leather handbags - looked artfully assembled and brought a new graphic quality we have yet to see in burly ranger coats. Underneath all the beef were wispy 1930s inflected dresses cut from slinky silk satin or completely transparent chiffon. It is true that many designers have tackled the sheer story over the last three seasons but none have done it like Prada, who offered hers up in a circular silhouette, trimmed with tufts of feather and fur. That, coupled with the new triangular piping on printed dresses and matching criss-cross straps on single-sole wedge pumps, gave us plenty of newness to dwell on.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Prada

Miuccia Prada packaged her womenswear show space in Milan in the same heavy-duty mover's felt we saw for her menswear show one month ago. Oddly enough, the power tool vibe had more to do with the girls than the boys this season, as Prada worked her women's outerwear into the proportions of giant cardboard moving boxes. Although they were cut like a 2-tonne container, these coats built slowly and effectively into decorative, even feminine, pieces. Prada's main design conceit was her magnificent colour blocking, which she achieved on stiff wool coats trimmed in contrast taping. From there, both the materials and the décor went into happy overdrive, moving to black and gold shearling trimmed in colourful cherry, lemon and rust curled lambswool. The effect - when paired with monochrome neck scarves, white plasticised wedge boots, and flat leather handbags - looked artfully assembled and brought a new graphic quality we have yet to see in burly ranger coats. Underneath all the beef were wispy 1930s inflected dresses cut from slinky silk satin or completely transparent chiffon. It is true that many designers have tackled the sheer story over the last three seasons but none have done it like Prada, who offered hers up in a circular silhouette, trimmed with tufts of feather and fur. That, coupled with the new triangular piping on printed dresses and matching criss-cross straps on single-sole wedge pumps, gave us plenty of newness to dwell on.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ports 1961

How many ways can one cut a classic men's shirt for a woman? In honour of Ports original No. 10 blouse, designer Fiona Cibani gave a wholehearted stab this season at finding out. From properly buttoned-up iterations worn classically under black sweaters and circle skirts, to the more elaborate layers of tiered cotton ruffles belted to look like a structured jacket, the white shirt came in multiple and inventive guises across the runway. When pleated into a jacket version, or worn with a draped white mink collar with loose black pants, this piece took on the clean lines of the strongest sections of the collection. The sheer arm versions, on the other hand, looked less successful with fussy black tuxedo overalls worn flap down. Cibani regained ground however, on her sharply tailored, mile-long, boot cut flared pants and the pleated leather skirt worn with a matching voluminous leather skirt that emerged as a convincing new winter tailleur.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ports 1961

How many ways can one cut a classic men's shirt for a woman? In honour of Ports original No. 10 blouse, designer Fiona Cibani gave a wholehearted stab this season at finding out. From properly buttoned-up iterations worn classically under black sweaters and circle skirts, to the more elaborate layers of tiered cotton ruffles belted to look like a structured jacket, the white shirt came in multiple and inventive guises across the runway. When pleated into a jacket version, or worn with a draped white mink collar with loose black pants, this piece took on the clean lines of the strongest sections of the collection. The sheer arm versions, on the other hand, looked less successful with fussy black tuxedo overalls worn flap down. Cibani regained ground however, on her sharply tailored, mile-long, boot cut flared pants and the pleated leather skirt worn with a matching voluminous leather skirt that emerged as a convincing new winter tailleur.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ports 1961

How many ways can one cut a classic men's shirt for a woman? In honour of Ports original No. 10 blouse, designer Fiona Cibani gave a wholehearted stab this season at finding out. From properly buttoned-up iterations worn classically under black sweaters and circle skirts, to the more elaborate layers of tiered cotton ruffles belted to look like a structured jacket, the white shirt came in multiple and inventive guises across the runway. When pleated into a jacket version, or worn with a draped white mink collar with loose black pants, this piece took on the clean lines of the strongest sections of the collection. The sheer arm versions, on the other hand, looked less successful with fussy black tuxedo overalls worn flap down. Cibani regained ground however, on her sharply tailored, mile-long, boot cut flared pants and the pleated leather skirt worn with a matching voluminous leather skirt that emerged as a convincing new winter tailleur.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ports 1961

How many ways can one cut a classic men's shirt for a woman? In honour of Ports original No. 10 blouse, designer Fiona Cibani gave a wholehearted stab this season at finding out. From properly buttoned-up iterations worn classically under black sweaters and circle skirts, to the more elaborate layers of tiered cotton ruffles belted to look like a structured jacket, the white shirt came in multiple and inventive guises across the runway. When pleated into a jacket version, or worn with a draped white mink collar with loose black pants, this piece took on the clean lines of the strongest sections of the collection. The sheer arm versions, on the other hand, looked less successful with fussy black tuxedo overalls worn flap down. Cibani regained ground however, on her sharply tailored, mile-long, boot cut flared pants and the pleated leather skirt worn with a matching voluminous leather skirt that emerged as a convincing new winter tailleur.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Ports 1961

How many ways can one cut a classic men's shirt for a woman? In honour of Ports original No. 10 blouse, designer Fiona Cibani gave a wholehearted stab this season at finding out. From properly buttoned-up iterations worn classically under black sweaters and circle skirts, to the more elaborate layers of tiered cotton ruffles belted to look like a structured jacket, the white shirt came in multiple and inventive guises across the runway. When pleated into a jacket version, or worn with a draped white mink collar with loose black pants, this piece took on the clean lines of the strongest sections of the collection. The sheer arm versions, on the other hand, looked less successful with fussy black tuxedo overalls worn flap down. Cibani regained ground however, on her sharply tailored, mile-long, boot cut flared pants and the pleated leather skirt worn with a matching voluminous leather skirt that emerged as a convincing new winter tailleur.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Moschino

For the first 50 minutes of Moschino's scheduled show time in Milan, the jury was still out on whether new creative director Jeremy Scott was the right choice for the job. Audience members, fanning away their heat and hunger, waited patiently first for a tardy Rita Ora and then a painfully late Katy Perry. The mood, it has to be said, was sour. But the minute the first model hit the runway wearing McDonald's golden arches on her pointy-toe pumps with a quilted handbag swinging off her arm like a serving of French fries, all trespasses were immediately forgiven. Jeremy Scott had his audience at the first Happy Meal and yet, the fun only swelled from that first line up of burger-like clothing (which, in a nod to the fast food theme, is already available in a select number of specialty and Moschino stores worldwide). Scott is the king of making bad taste look tantalising and here he played with all manners of trash, from 1980s Versace gilded bondage and SpongeBob SquarePants motifs to the aisles of American mini-marts, where he mined popcorn, gummy bears, Froot Loops, and cheese puffs for his printed cocktail dresses. It is possible that we've never seen a couture-worthy ball gown fashioned out of a can of Budweiser, and it is most definitely the first time we've seen a wedding gown complete with a nutritional facts table. The wit, humour and irony that founder Franco Moschino brought to the notoriously stuffy fashion world is something that has, up until now, been almost impossible to replicate. But now we see this sliver of pure fantasy in the open heart of Scott, a designer whose enthusiasm is entirely infectious. With this debut, Scott managed the quickest and sharpest turn around in an audience's mood that we have yet to witness, ever, at a fashion show. Even the most jaded of fashion editors could not suppress their smiles, or at least a toe-tap or two, at the resounding finale.

Writer: JJ Martin

Moschino

For the first 50 minutes of Moschino's scheduled show time in Milan, the jury was still out on whether new creative director Jeremy Scott was the right choice for the job. Audience members, fanning away their heat and hunger, waited patiently first for a tardy Rita Ora and then a painfully late Katy Perry. The mood, it has to be said, was sour. But the minute the first model hit the runway wearing McDonald's golden arches on her pointy-toe pumps with a quilted handbag swinging off her arm like a serving of French fries, all trespasses were immediately forgiven. Jeremy Scott had his audience at the first Happy Meal and yet, the fun only swelled from that first line up of burger-like clothing (which, in a nod to the fast food theme, is already available in a select number of specialty and Moschino stores worldwide). Scott is the king of making bad taste look tantalising and here he played with all manners of trash, from 1980s Versace gilded bondage and SpongeBob SquarePants motifs to the aisles of American mini-marts, where he mined popcorn, gummy bears, Froot Loops, and cheese puffs for his printed cocktail dresses. It is possible that we've never seen a couture-worthy ball gown fashioned out of a can of Budweiser, and it is most definitely the first time we've seen a wedding gown complete with a nutritional facts table. The wit, humour and irony that founder Franco Moschino brought to the notoriously stuffy fashion world is something that has, up until now, been almost impossible to replicate. But now we see this sliver of pure fantasy in the open heart of Scott, a designer whose enthusiasm is entirely infectious. With this debut, Scott managed the quickest and sharpest turn around in an audience's mood that we have yet to witness, ever, at a fashion show. Even the most jaded of fashion editors could not suppress their smiles, or at least a toe-tap or two, at the resounding finale.

Writer: JJ Martin

Moschino

For the first 50 minutes of Moschino's scheduled show time in Milan, the jury was still out on whether new creative director Jeremy Scott was the right choice for the job. Audience members, fanning away their heat and hunger, waited patiently first for a tardy Rita Ora and then a painfully late Katy Perry. The mood, it has to be said, was sour. But the minute the first model hit the runway wearing McDonald's golden arches on her pointy-toe pumps with a quilted handbag swinging off her arm like a serving of French fries, all trespasses were immediately forgiven. Jeremy Scott had his audience at the first Happy Meal and yet, the fun only swelled from that first line up of burger-like clothing (which, in a nod to the fast food theme, is already available in a select number of specialty and Moschino stores worldwide). Scott is the king of making bad taste look tantalising and here he played with all manners of trash, from 1980s Versace gilded bondage and SpongeBob SquarePants motifs to the aisles of American mini-marts, where he mined popcorn, gummy bears, Froot Loops, and cheese puffs for his printed cocktail dresses. It is possible that we've never seen a couture-worthy ball gown fashioned out of a can of Budweiser, and it is most definitely the first time we've seen a wedding gown complete with a nutritional facts table. The wit, humour and irony that founder Franco Moschino brought to the notoriously stuffy fashion world is something that has, up until now, been almost impossible to replicate. But now we see this sliver of pure fantasy in the open heart of Scott, a designer whose enthusiasm is entirely infectious. With this debut, Scott managed the quickest and sharpest turn around in an audience's mood that we have yet to witness, ever, at a fashion show. Even the most jaded of fashion editors could not suppress their smiles, or at least a toe-tap or two, at the resounding finale.

Writer: JJ Martin

Moschino

For the first 50 minutes of Moschino's scheduled show time in Milan, the jury was still out on whether new creative director Jeremy Scott was the right choice for the job. Audience members, fanning away their heat and hunger, waited patiently first for a tardy Rita Ora and then a painfully late Katy Perry. The mood, it has to be said, was sour. But the minute the first model hit the runway wearing McDonald's golden arches on her pointy-toe pumps with a quilted handbag swinging off her arm like a serving of French fries, all trespasses were immediately forgiven. Jeremy Scott had his audience at the first Happy Meal and yet, the fun only swelled from that first line up of burger-like clothing (which, in a nod to the fast food theme, is already available in a select number of specialty and Moschino stores worldwide). Scott is the king of making bad taste look tantalising and here he played with all manners of trash, from 1980s Versace gilded bondage and SpongeBob SquarePants motifs to the aisles of American mini-marts, where he mined popcorn, gummy bears, Froot Loops, and cheese puffs for his printed cocktail dresses. It is possible that we've never seen a couture-worthy ball gown fashioned out of a can of Budweiser, and it is most definitely the first time we've seen a wedding gown complete with a nutritional facts table. The wit, humour and irony that founder Franco Moschino brought to the notoriously stuffy fashion world is something that has, up until now, been almost impossible to replicate. But now we see this sliver of pure fantasy in the open heart of Scott, a designer whose enthusiasm is entirely infectious. With this debut, Scott managed the quickest and sharpest turn around in an audience's mood that we have yet to witness, ever, at a fashion show. Even the most jaded of fashion editors could not suppress their smiles, or at least a toe-tap or two, at the resounding finale.

Writer: JJ Martin

Moschino

For the first 50 minutes of Moschino's scheduled show time in Milan, the jury was still out on whether new creative director Jeremy Scott was the right choice for the job. Audience members, fanning away their heat and hunger, waited patiently first for a tardy Rita Ora and then a painfully late Katy Perry. The mood, it has to be said, was sour. But the minute the first model hit the runway wearing McDonald's golden arches on her pointy-toe pumps with a quilted handbag swinging off her arm like a serving of French fries, all trespasses were immediately forgiven. Jeremy Scott had his audience at the first Happy Meal and yet, the fun only swelled from that first line up of burger-like clothing (which, in a nod to the fast food theme, is already available in a select number of specialty and Moschino stores worldwide). Scott is the king of making bad taste look tantalising and here he played with all manners of trash, from 1980s Versace gilded bondage and SpongeBob SquarePants motifs to the aisles of American mini-marts, where he mined popcorn, gummy bears, Froot Loops, and cheese puffs for his printed cocktail dresses. It is possible that we've never seen a couture-worthy ball gown fashioned out of a can of Budweiser, and it is most definitely the first time we've seen a wedding gown complete with a nutritional facts table. The wit, humour and irony that founder Franco Moschino brought to the notoriously stuffy fashion world is something that has, up until now, been almost impossible to replicate. But now we see this sliver of pure fantasy in the open heart of Scott, a designer whose enthusiasm is entirely infectious. With this debut, Scott managed the quickest and sharpest turn around in an audience's mood that we have yet to witness, ever, at a fashion show. Even the most jaded of fashion editors could not suppress their smiles, or at least a toe-tap or two, at the resounding finale.

Writer: JJ Martin

Emporio Armani

The Italian designer Giorgio Armani loves a bold piece of headgear and this season he fashioned large bowler-style crowns on the tops of his hats for Emporio Armani. The oversized volume was a theme that weaved in and out of the collection as Armani introduced a new cropped wide-leg pant that was blown up with air. When cut in stiffened wool silk and paired with pointed flats the new silhouette looked fresh and fun. The more rigid materials - as opposed to drooping silks and velvets - had the most success in the collection. They looked terrific, for example, on structured swing skirts paired with cropped jackets or on a tank dress featuring a circular skirt that leaned beautifully away from the body. Shiny plastic neckwear almost took the collection off track but Armani got back on his rails with rows of miniature white beading that added graphic borders to his jackets, trousers and bags.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emporio Armani

The Italian designer Giorgio Armani loves a bold piece of headgear and this season he fashioned large bowler-style crowns on the tops of his hats for Emporio Armani. The oversized volume was a theme that weaved in and out of the collection as Armani introduced a new cropped wide-leg pant that was blown up with air. When cut in stiffened wool silk and paired with pointed flats the new silhouette looked fresh and fun. The more rigid materials - as opposed to drooping silks and velvets - had the most success in the collection. They looked terrific, for example, on structured swing skirts paired with cropped jackets or on a tank dress featuring a circular skirt that leaned beautifully away from the body. Shiny plastic neckwear almost took the collection off track but Armani got back on his rails with rows of miniature white beading that added graphic borders to his jackets, trousers and bags.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emporio Armani

The Italian designer Giorgio Armani loves a bold piece of headgear and this season he fashioned large bowler-style crowns on the tops of his hats for Emporio Armani. The oversized volume was a theme that weaved in and out of the collection as Armani introduced a new cropped wide-leg pant that was blown up with air. When cut in stiffened wool silk and paired with pointed flats the new silhouette looked fresh and fun. The more rigid materials - as opposed to drooping silks and velvets - had the most success in the collection. They looked terrific, for example, on structured swing skirts paired with cropped jackets or on a tank dress featuring a circular skirt that leaned beautifully away from the body. Shiny plastic neckwear almost took the collection off track but Armani got back on his rails with rows of miniature white beading that added graphic borders to his jackets, trousers and bags.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emporio Armani

The Italian designer Giorgio Armani loves a bold piece of headgear and this season he fashioned large bowler-style crowns on the tops of his hats for Emporio Armani. The oversized volume was a theme that weaved in and out of the collection as Armani introduced a new cropped wide-leg pant that was blown up with air. When cut in stiffened wool silk and paired with pointed flats the new silhouette looked fresh and fun. The more rigid materials - as opposed to drooping silks and velvets - had the most success in the collection. They looked terrific, for example, on structured swing skirts paired with cropped jackets or on a tank dress featuring a circular skirt that leaned beautifully away from the body. Shiny plastic neckwear almost took the collection off track but Armani got back on his rails with rows of miniature white beading that added graphic borders to his jackets, trousers and bags.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emporio Armani

The Italian designer Giorgio Armani loves a bold piece of headgear and this season he fashioned large bowler-style crowns on the tops of his hats for Emporio Armani. The oversized volume was a theme that weaved in and out of the collection as Armani introduced a new cropped wide-leg pant that was blown up with air. When cut in stiffened wool silk and paired with pointed flats the new silhouette looked fresh and fun. The more rigid materials - as opposed to drooping silks and velvets - had the most success in the collection. They looked terrific, for example, on structured swing skirts paired with cropped jackets or on a tank dress featuring a circular skirt that leaned beautifully away from the body. Shiny plastic neckwear almost took the collection off track but Armani got back on his rails with rows of miniature white beading that added graphic borders to his jackets, trousers and bags.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Sportmax

There's been a shake up in the design ranks at Sportmax over the last few seasons, sifting a new layer of cool on its fashion runway. The collection opened with plays on leopard and python, two roaring animal prints that have seen their fair share of show time. But here, cut into sturdy coats and narrow V-neck dresses, the wild graphics were tamed. The streamlined shapes were immaculate, set off by extra-long leather arm cuffs while equestrian-inspired martingales were used as thick clean belts to divide the canvas. By mid-show, Sportmax had already converted its audience with a strong outing but things only continued to bubble more vivaciously with woolly multi-coloured mohair coats, dip-dyed wool suiting and a brilliant neon jacquard, with Jackson Pollock-like squiggles and drips, that was imagined in narrow Modernist 2-piece skirt suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Sportmax

There's been a shake up in the design ranks at Sportmax over the last few seasons, sifting a new layer of cool on its fashion runway. The collection opened with plays on leopard and python, two roaring animal prints that have seen their fair share of show time. But here, cut into sturdy coats and narrow V-neck dresses, the wild graphics were tamed. The streamlined shapes were immaculate, set off by extra-long leather arm cuffs while equestrian-inspired martingales were used as thick clean belts to divide the canvas. By mid-show, Sportmax had already converted its audience with a strong outing but things only continued to bubble more vivaciously with woolly multi-coloured mohair coats, dip-dyed wool suiting and a brilliant neon jacquard, with Jackson Pollock-like squiggles and drips, that was imagined in narrow Modernist 2-piece skirt suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Sportmax

There's been a shake up in the design ranks at Sportmax over the last few seasons, sifting a new layer of cool on its fashion runway. The collection opened with plays on leopard and python, two roaring animal prints that have seen their fair share of show time. But here, cut into sturdy coats and narrow V-neck dresses, the wild graphics were tamed. The streamlined shapes were immaculate, set off by extra-long leather arm cuffs while equestrian-inspired martingales were used as thick clean belts to divide the canvas. By mid-show, Sportmax had already converted its audience with a strong outing but things only continued to bubble more vivaciously with woolly multi-coloured mohair coats, dip-dyed wool suiting and a brilliant neon jacquard, with Jackson Pollock-like squiggles and drips, that was imagined in narrow Modernist 2-piece skirt suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Sportmax

There's been a shake up in the design ranks at Sportmax over the last few seasons, sifting a new layer of cool on its fashion runway. The collection opened with plays on leopard and python, two roaring animal prints that have seen their fair share of show time. But here, cut into sturdy coats and narrow V-neck dresses, the wild graphics were tamed. The streamlined shapes were immaculate, set off by extra-long leather arm cuffs while equestrian-inspired martingales were used as thick clean belts to divide the canvas. By mid-show, Sportmax had already converted its audience with a strong outing but things only continued to bubble more vivaciously with woolly multi-coloured mohair coats, dip-dyed wool suiting and a brilliant neon jacquard, with Jackson Pollock-like squiggles and drips, that was imagined in narrow Modernist 2-piece skirt suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Sportmax

There's been a shake up in the design ranks at Sportmax over the last few seasons, sifting a new layer of cool on its fashion runway. The collection opened with plays on leopard and python, two roaring animal prints that have seen their fair share of show time. But here, cut into sturdy coats and narrow V-neck dresses, the wild graphics were tamed. The streamlined shapes were immaculate, set off by extra-long leather arm cuffs while equestrian-inspired martingales were used as thick clean belts to divide the canvas. By mid-show, Sportmax had already converted its audience with a strong outing but things only continued to bubble more vivaciously with woolly multi-coloured mohair coats, dip-dyed wool suiting and a brilliant neon jacquard, with Jackson Pollock-like squiggles and drips, that was imagined in narrow Modernist 2-piece skirt suiting.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Tod's

Alessandra Facchinetti hit a home run last season in her debut for Tod’s and her sophomore effort proved that this was no fluke. Building further on the strong foundation she laid last season, Facchinetti presented another collection rooted in the footwear brand’s leather goods expertise. Working with buttery, paper-thin slices of leather in cream and white, or striking puzzle piece-like intarsia formations, Facchinetti cut voluminous asymmetrical anorak-style capes and clothes that edged away from the body. There was a strong focus on outerwear - it is a winter season after all - and she nailed a boxy silhouette with a boyish crop in the front while trailing a feminine flourish from behind. Train constructions, normally reserved for formal ball gowns, were worked in unusual ways, such as on a lavender patent leather dress cut to the knee. There were indulgent details every where you looked in this collection, from the supersized leather visors that wrapped around the head like chic umbrellas, to leather aprons worn as waist and shoulder flaps, and finally, touches of luxe mink that were wrapped around wrists, ankles and necks as chokers. Topped with Tod’s fine footwear - patent leather knee-high boots, loafers and rugged ankle boots - Facchinetti has quickly created a signature look that is an intriguing and very welcome addition to Milan’s sometimes-staid fashion scene.

Tod's

Alessandra Facchinetti hit a home run last season in her debut for Tod’s and her sophomore effort proved that this was no fluke. Building further on the strong foundation she laid last season, Facchinetti presented another collection rooted in the footwear brand’s leather goods expertise. Working with buttery, paper-thin slices of leather in cream and white, or striking puzzle piece-like intarsia formations, Facchinetti cut voluminous asymmetrical anorak-style capes and clothes that edged away from the body. There was a strong focus on outerwear - it is a winter season after all - and she nailed a boxy silhouette with a boyish crop in the front while trailing a feminine flourish from behind. Train constructions, normally reserved for formal ball gowns, were worked in unusual ways, such as on a lavender patent leather dress cut to the knee. There were indulgent details every where you looked in this collection, from the supersized leather visors that wrapped around the head like chic umbrellas, to leather aprons worn as waist and shoulder flaps, and finally, touches of luxe mink that were wrapped around wrists, ankles and necks as chokers. Topped with Tod’s fine footwear - patent leather knee-high boots, loafers and rugged ankle boots - Facchinetti has quickly created a signature look that is an intriguing and very welcome addition to Milan’s sometimes-staid fashion scene.

Tod's

Alessandra Facchinetti hit a home run last season in her debut for Tod’s and her sophomore effort proved that this was no fluke. Building further on the strong foundation she laid last season, Facchinetti presented another collection rooted in the footwear brand’s leather goods expertise. Working with buttery, paper-thin slices of leather in cream and white, or striking puzzle piece-like intarsia formations, Facchinetti cut voluminous asymmetrical anorak-style capes and clothes that edged away from the body. There was a strong focus on outerwear - it is a winter season after all - and she nailed a boxy silhouette with a boyish crop in the front while trailing a feminine flourish from behind. Train constructions, normally reserved for formal ball gowns, were worked in unusual ways, such as on a lavender patent leather dress cut to the knee. There were indulgent details every where you looked in this collection, from the supersized leather visors that wrapped around the head like chic umbrellas, to leather aprons worn as waist and shoulder flaps, and finally, touches of luxe mink that were wrapped around wrists, ankles and necks as chokers. Topped with Tod’s fine footwear - patent leather knee-high boots, loafers and rugged ankle boots - Facchinetti has quickly created a signature look that is an intriguing and very welcome addition to Milan’s sometimes-staid fashion scene.

Tod's

Alessandra Facchinetti hit a home run last season in her debut for Tod’s and her sophomore effort proved that this was no fluke. Building further on the strong foundation she laid last season, Facchinetti presented another collection rooted in the footwear brand’s leather goods expertise. Working with buttery, paper-thin slices of leather in cream and white, or striking puzzle piece-like intarsia formations, Facchinetti cut voluminous asymmetrical anorak-style capes and clothes that edged away from the body. There was a strong focus on outerwear - it is a winter season after all - and she nailed a boxy silhouette with a boyish crop in the front while trailing a feminine flourish from behind. Train constructions, normally reserved for formal ball gowns, were worked in unusual ways, such as on a lavender patent leather dress cut to the knee. There were indulgent details every where you looked in this collection, from the supersized leather visors that wrapped around the head like chic umbrellas, to leather aprons worn as waist and shoulder flaps, and finally, touches of luxe mink that were wrapped around wrists, ankles and necks as chokers. Topped with Tod’s fine footwear - patent leather knee-high boots, loafers and rugged ankle boots - Facchinetti has quickly created a signature look that is an intriguing and very welcome addition to Milan’s sometimes-staid fashion scene.

Tod's

Alessandra Facchinetti hit a home run last season in her debut for Tod’s and her sophomore effort proved that this was no fluke. Building further on the strong foundation she laid last season, Facchinetti presented another collection rooted in the footwear brand’s leather goods expertise. Working with buttery, paper-thin slices of leather in cream and white, or striking puzzle piece-like intarsia formations, Facchinetti cut voluminous asymmetrical anorak-style capes and clothes that edged away from the body. There was a strong focus on outerwear - it is a winter season after all - and she nailed a boxy silhouette with a boyish crop in the front while trailing a feminine flourish from behind. Train constructions, normally reserved for formal ball gowns, were worked in unusual ways, such as on a lavender patent leather dress cut to the knee. There were indulgent details every where you looked in this collection, from the supersized leather visors that wrapped around the head like chic umbrellas, to leather aprons worn as waist and shoulder flaps, and finally, touches of luxe mink that were wrapped around wrists, ankles and necks as chokers. Topped with Tod’s fine footwear - patent leather knee-high boots, loafers and rugged ankle boots - Facchinetti has quickly created a signature look that is an intriguing and very welcome addition to Milan’s sometimes-staid fashion scene.

Versace

In comparison to the last several seasons that we've seen from this Milanese designer, A/W was tame by Versace standards. The mistress of maximalism began her show with an almost sober long sleeve, bias-cut dress with asymmetrical hems. Sure, the knee-length skirt had some kick to it, but the clean wool jersey material - later worked in brilliant shades of turquoise, jade and cinnamon - created a calming canvas that felt newly tranquil. Boxy jackets and trapeze shaped coats, especially in deeply hued couture duchesse silk satin, also gave the collection an altered - and welcomed - calibration. That is not to say however that the Versace girls lost their va va voom. Hemlines were still scant, hips were still hugged, and accessories were still generously embraced. In fact, gold metal sprouted liberally along studded trims, on coin bracelets, across embellished bags, and even on gold embroidered sashes that wrapped around figure-hugging gowns, not unlike a beauty pageant queen. Donatella used a military compass to guide the rigorous tailoring of her latest collection and also used the opportunity to shower mini dresses in officer's button, and snug jackets with gold frogging or corporal-like epaulettes. Suede fringe, meanwhile, found its way onto mini skirts and draping off intarsia mink coats. That, coupled with the saucy suede lace-up high boots featuring intricate beading and embroidery, seemed like an irresistible move to sexpot territory.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Versace

In comparison to the last several seasons that we've seen from this Milanese designer, A/W was tame by Versace standards. The mistress of maximalism began her show with an almost sober long sleeve, bias-cut dress with asymmetrical hems. Sure, the knee-length skirt had some kick to it, but the clean wool jersey material - later worked in brilliant shades of turquoise, jade and cinnamon - created a calming canvas that felt newly tranquil. Boxy jackets and trapeze shaped coats, especially in deeply hued couture duchesse silk satin, also gave the collection an altered - and welcomed - calibration. That is not to say however that the Versace girls lost their va va voom. Hemlines were still scant, hips were still hugged, and accessories were still generously embraced. In fact, gold metal sprouted liberally along studded trims, on coin bracelets, across embellished bags, and even on gold embroidered sashes that wrapped around figure-hugging gowns, not unlike a beauty pageant queen. Donatella used a military compass to guide the rigorous tailoring of her latest collection and also used the opportunity to shower mini dresses in officer's button, and snug jackets with gold frogging or corporal-like epaulettes. Suede fringe, meanwhile, found its way onto mini skirts and draping off intarsia mink coats. That, coupled with the saucy suede lace-up high boots featuring intricate beading and embroidery, seemed like an irresistible move to sexpot territory.

​Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Versace

In comparison to the last several seasons that we've seen from this Milanese designer, A/W was tame by Versace standards. The mistress of maximalism began her show with an almost sober long sleeve, bias-cut dress with asymmetrical hems. Sure, the knee-length skirt had some kick to it, but the clean wool jersey material - later worked in brilliant shades of turquoise, jade and cinnamon - created a calming canvas that felt newly tranquil. Boxy jackets and trapeze shaped coats, especially in deeply hued couture duchesse silk satin, also gave the collection an altered - and welcomed - calibration. That is not to say however that the Versace girls lost their va va voom. Hemlines were still scant, hips were still hugged, and accessories were still generously embraced. In fact, gold metal sprouted liberally along studded trims, on coin bracelets, across embellished bags, and even on gold embroidered sashes that wrapped around figure-hugging gowns, not unlike a beauty pageant queen. Donatella used a military compass to guide the rigorous tailoring of her latest collection and also used the opportunity to shower mini dresses in officer's button, and snug jackets with gold frogging or corporal-like epaulettes. Suede fringe, meanwhile, found its way onto mini skirts and draping off intarsia mink coats. That, coupled with the saucy suede lace-up high boots featuring intricate beading and embroidery, seemed like an irresistible move to sexpot territory.

​Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Versace

In comparison to the last several seasons that we've seen from this Milanese designer, A/W was tame by Versace standards. The mistress of maximalism began her show with an almost sober long sleeve, bias-cut dress with asymmetrical hems. Sure, the knee-length skirt had some kick to it, but the clean wool jersey material - later worked in brilliant shades of turquoise, jade and cinnamon - created a calming canvas that felt newly tranquil. Boxy jackets and trapeze shaped coats, especially in deeply hued couture duchesse silk satin, also gave the collection an altered - and welcomed - calibration. That is not to say however that the Versace girls lost their va va voom. Hemlines were still scant, hips were still hugged, and accessories were still generously embraced. In fact, gold metal sprouted liberally along studded trims, on coin bracelets, across embellished bags, and even on gold embroidered sashes that wrapped around figure-hugging gowns, not unlike a beauty pageant queen. Donatella used a military compass to guide the rigorous tailoring of her latest collection and also used the opportunity to shower mini dresses in officer's button, and snug jackets with gold frogging or corporal-like epaulettes. Suede fringe, meanwhile, found its way onto mini skirts and draping off intarsia mink coats. That, coupled with the saucy suede lace-up high boots featuring intricate beading and embroidery, seemed like an irresistible move to sexpot territory.

​Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Versace

In comparison to the last several seasons that we've seen from this Milanese designer, A/W was tame by Versace standards. The mistress of maximalism began her show with an almost sober long sleeve, bias-cut dress with asymmetrical hems. Sure, the knee-length skirt had some kick to it, but the clean wool jersey material - later worked in brilliant shades of turquoise, jade and cinnamon - created a calming canvas that felt newly tranquil. Boxy jackets and trapeze shaped coats, especially in deeply hued couture duchesse silk satin, also gave the collection an altered - and welcomed - calibration. That is not to say however that the Versace girls lost their va va voom. Hemlines were still scant, hips were still hugged, and accessories were still generously embraced. In fact, gold metal sprouted liberally along studded trims, on coin bracelets, across embellished bags, and even on gold embroidered sashes that wrapped around figure-hugging gowns, not unlike a beauty pageant queen. Donatella used a military compass to guide the rigorous tailoring of her latest collection and also used the opportunity to shower mini dresses in officer's button, and snug jackets with gold frogging or corporal-like epaulettes. Suede fringe, meanwhile, found its way onto mini skirts and draping off intarsia mink coats. That, coupled with the saucy suede lace-up high boots featuring intricate beading and embroidery, seemed like an irresistible move to sexpot territory.

​Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Bottega Veneta

If there was a single trouser on the Bottega Veneta runway this morning in Milan, we certainly didn't see it, as creative director Tomas Maier was fully entranced by the feminine power of the dress and the practical pairing of skirt with sweater. Maier is a well-seasoned expert at womanly dressing, so the challenge for Winter was how to make all of this look new. He accomplished this with pleating and slits, which he cleverly cut into the constructions of the skirts and dresses. When the girls walked, their legs pushed the material to reveal a burst of contrasting coloured panels beneath. Compounding the graphic effect were fractured rays that Maier either printed or stitched into intarsias over the dress bodies. The workmanship built, as it typically does in a Bottega show, slowly and subtly, as more substantial wools, satins, leather inserts, and beading were introduced. The apex of this was densely pleated dresses, whose pattern created 3D squiggling coils around the body. But our highlight was a long sleeve wool jersey dress that was crafted from zig-zagged vertical panels of cream, black and lime. It was sharp and streamlined, yet utterly feminine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Bottega Veneta

If there was a single trouser on the Bottega Veneta runway this morning in Milan, we certainly didn't see it, as creative director Tomas Maier was fully entranced by the feminine power of the dress and the practical pairing of skirt with sweater. Maier is a well-seasoned expert at womanly dressing, so the challenge for Winter was how to make all of this look new. He accomplished this with pleating and slits, which he cleverly cut into the constructions of the skirts and dresses. When the girls walked, their legs pushed the material to reveal a burst of contrasting coloured panels beneath. Compounding the graphic effect were fractured rays that Maier either printed or stitched into intarsias over the dress bodies. The workmanship built, as it typically does in a Bottega show, slowly and subtly, as more substantial wools, satins, leather inserts, and beading were introduced. The apex of this was densely pleated dresses, whose pattern created 3D squiggling coils around the body. But our highlight was a long sleeve wool jersey dress that was crafted from zig-zagged vertical panels of cream, black and lime. It was sharp and streamlined, yet utterly feminine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Bottega Veneta

If there was a single trouser on the Bottega Veneta runway this morning in Milan, we certainly didn't see it, as creative director Tomas Maier was fully entranced by the feminine power of the dress and the practical pairing of skirt with sweater. Maier is a well-seasoned expert at womanly dressing, so the challenge for Winter was how to make all of this look new. He accomplished this with pleating and slits, which he cleverly cut into the constructions of the skirts and dresses. When the girls walked, their legs pushed the material to reveal a burst of contrasting coloured panels beneath. Compounding the graphic effect were fractured rays that Maier either printed or stitched into intarsias over the dress bodies. The workmanship built, as it typically does in a Bottega show, slowly and subtly, as more substantial wools, satins, leather inserts, and beading were introduced. The apex of this was densely pleated dresses, whose pattern created 3D squiggling coils around the body. But our highlight was a long sleeve wool jersey dress that was crafted from zig-zagged vertical panels of cream, black and lime. It was sharp and streamlined, yet utterly feminine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Bottega Veneta

If there was a single trouser on the Bottega Veneta runway this morning in Milan, we certainly didn't see it, as creative director Tomas Maier was fully entranced by the feminine power of the dress and the practical pairing of skirt with sweater. Maier is a well-seasoned expert at womanly dressing, so the challenge for Winter was how to make all of this look new. He accomplished this with pleating and slits, which he cleverly cut into the constructions of the skirts and dresses. When the girls walked, their legs pushed the material to reveal a burst of contrasting coloured panels beneath. Compounding the graphic effect were fractured rays that Maier either printed or stitched into intarsias over the dress bodies. The workmanship built, as it typically does in a Bottega show, slowly and subtly, as more substantial wools, satins, leather inserts, and beading were introduced. The apex of this was densely pleated dresses, whose pattern created 3D squiggling coils around the body. But our highlight was a long sleeve wool jersey dress that was crafted from zig-zagged vertical panels of cream, black and lime. It was sharp and streamlined, yet utterly feminine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Bottega Veneta

If there was a single trouser on the Bottega Veneta runway this morning in Milan, we certainly didn't see it, as creative director Tomas Maier was fully entranced by the feminine power of the dress and the practical pairing of skirt with sweater. Maier is a well-seasoned expert at womanly dressing, so the challenge for Winter was how to make all of this look new. He accomplished this with pleating and slits, which he cleverly cut into the constructions of the skirts and dresses. When the girls walked, their legs pushed the material to reveal a burst of contrasting coloured panels beneath. Compounding the graphic effect were fractured rays that Maier either printed or stitched into intarsias over the dress bodies. The workmanship built, as it typically does in a Bottega show, slowly and subtly, as more substantial wools, satins, leather inserts, and beading were introduced. The apex of this was densely pleated dresses, whose pattern created 3D squiggling coils around the body. But our highlight was a long sleeve wool jersey dress that was crafted from zig-zagged vertical panels of cream, black and lime. It was sharp and streamlined, yet utterly feminine.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roberto Cavalli

The scalding ring of fire that curved around a pool of water at the Roberto Cavalli show ignited a fierce setting for the Florentine designer's tribal infused show. As the models strutted out in vacuum sucked python pants and jackets trimmed with fox collars, one could almost imagine them hooting and hollering on their stiletto pin-heels like ancient warriors giving thanks to the gods before the flames. In reality, the Cavalli woman will shower her thanks directly on Roberto next winter as the designer delivered a fantastic fusion of roaring wild kingdom sexiness and 1920s chic. Much like last season, the silhouettes were planted in the jazz age where drop-waist flapper dresses created a refined, but highly spirited look. Cavalli brought his own unique flavour to these classic shapes by cutting the fringe from every leather, skin, feather and fur he could get his animal loving hands on. Similarly speaking, printing and metal studding created intricate patterns over the clothes, adding to the indigenous vibe. But these clothes were anything but primitive: a chinchilla coat with alligator arms, leather studded flapper fringe, pierced and punched to oblivion, and a finale of crunchy bead-embroidered sheer gowns, all screamed modern civilization. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roberto Cavalli

The scalding ring of fire that curved around a pool of water at the Roberto Cavalli show ignited a fierce setting for the Florentine designer's tribal infused show. As the models strutted out in vacuum sucked python pants and jackets trimmed with fox collars, one could almost imagine them hooting and hollering on their stiletto pin-heels like ancient warriors giving thanks to the gods before the flames. In reality, the Cavalli woman will shower her thanks directly on Roberto next winter as the designer delivered a fantastic fusion of roaring wild kingdom sexiness and 1920s chic. Much like last season, the silhouettes were planted in the jazz age where drop-waist flapper dresses created a refined, but highly spirited look. Cavalli brought his own unique flavour to these classic shapes by cutting the fringe from every leather, skin, feather and fur he could get his animal loving hands on. Similarly speaking, printing and metal studding created intricate patterns over the clothes, adding to the indigenous vibe. But these clothes were anything but primitive: a chinchilla coat with alligator arms, leather studded flapper fringe, pierced and punched to oblivion, and a finale of crunchy bead-embroidered sheer gowns, all screamed modern civilization.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roberto Cavalli

The scalding ring of fire that curved around a pool of water at the Roberto Cavalli show ignited a fierce setting for the Florentine designer's tribal infused show. As the models strutted out in vacuum sucked python pants and jackets trimmed with fox collars, one could almost imagine them hooting and hollering on their stiletto pin-heels like ancient warriors giving thanks to the gods before the flames. In reality, the Cavalli woman will shower her thanks directly on Roberto next winter as the designer delivered a fantastic fusion of roaring wild kingdom sexiness and 1920s chic. Much like last season, the silhouettes were planted in the jazz age where drop-waist flapper dresses created a refined, but highly spirited look. Cavalli brought his own unique flavour to these classic shapes by cutting the fringe from every leather, skin, feather and fur he could get his animal loving hands on. Similarly speaking, printing and metal studding created intricate patterns over the clothes, adding to the indigenous vibe. But these clothes were anything but primitive: a chinchilla coat with alligator arms, leather studded flapper fringe, pierced and punched to oblivion, and a finale of crunchy bead-embroidered sheer gowns, all screamed modern civilization.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roberto Cavalli

The scalding ring of fire that curved around a pool of water at the Roberto Cavalli show ignited a fierce setting for the Florentine designer's tribal infused show. As the models strutted out in vacuum sucked python pants and jackets trimmed with fox collars, one could almost imagine them hooting and hollering on their stiletto pin-heels like ancient warriors giving thanks to the gods before the flames. In reality, the Cavalli woman will shower her thanks directly on Roberto next winter as the designer delivered a fantastic fusion of roaring wild kingdom sexiness and 1920s chic. Much like last season, the silhouettes were planted in the jazz age where drop-waist flapper dresses created a refined, but highly spirited look. Cavalli brought his own unique flavour to these classic shapes by cutting the fringe from every leather, skin, feather and fur he could get his animal loving hands on. Similarly speaking, printing and metal studding created intricate patterns over the clothes, adding to the indigenous vibe. But these clothes were anything but primitive: a chinchilla coat with alligator arms, leather studded flapper fringe, pierced and punched to oblivion, and a finale of crunchy bead-embroidered sheer gowns, all screamed modern civilization. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roberto Cavalli

The scalding ring of fire that curved around a pool of water at the Roberto Cavalli show ignited a fierce setting for the Florentine designer's tribal infused show. As the models strutted out in vacuum sucked python pants and jackets trimmed with fox collars, one could almost imagine them hooting and hollering on their stiletto pin-heels like ancient warriors giving thanks to the gods before the flames. In reality, the Cavalli woman will shower her thanks directly on Roberto next winter as the designer delivered a fantastic fusion of roaring wild kingdom sexiness and 1920s chic. Much like last season, the silhouettes were planted in the jazz age where drop-waist flapper dresses created a refined, but highly spirited look. Cavalli brought his own unique flavour to these classic shapes by cutting the fringe from every leather, skin, feather and fur he could get his animal loving hands on. Similarly speaking, printing and metal studding created intricate patterns over the clothes, adding to the indigenous vibe. But these clothes were anything but primitive: a chinchilla coat with alligator arms, leather studded flapper fringe, pierced and punched to oblivion, and a finale of crunchy bead-embroidered sheer gowns, all screamed modern civilization.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Antonio Marras

Antonio Marras is Milan's resident romantic and consistently one of our favourite fashion talents. What one sees on the Marras runway never emerges anywhere else in Milan, making his art-tinged collections all the more special. This season the Sardinian designer took snow-jumping wolves as his inspiration. Images of the woodsy creatures were printed onto duchesse satin, beaded onto intricate chain mail, and recreated like illustrations on the front of crystal-covered knitwear. Even the models' hair had a touch of the wild, wrapped as they were into waves on either side of the head that resembled fox ears. The workmanship at a Marras show is always something to behold and this season he made magical layers of fur, embroidery and sturdy wools such as a pink furry panel covered in jet embroidered and sewn onto mannish tweed coats. The romantic quotient, on the other hand, seemed slightly tamed by the designer's own poetic standards, as he moved into more tailoring and even sports inflected silhouettes like anoraks, bomber jackets and military-tinged coats. The arts and craft soul of this designer can never be fully extinguished, however. Which means that there was still plenty of pretty pleated chiffon, macramé lace and fancy crystal cages transforming the menswear touches into artfully detailed collages.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Antonio Marras

Antonio Marras is Milan's resident romantic and consistently one of our favourite fashion talents. What one sees on the Marras runway never emerges anywhere else in Milan, making his art-tinged collections all the more special. This season the Sardinian designer took snow-jumping wolves as his inspiration. Images of the woodsy creatures were printed onto duchesse satin, beaded onto intricate chain mail, and recreated like illustrations on the front of crystal-covered knitwear. Even the models' hair had a touch of the wild, wrapped as they were into waves on either side of the head that resembled fox ears. The workmanship at a Marras show is always something to behold and this season he made magical layers of fur, embroidery and sturdy wools such as a pink furry panel covered in jet embroidered and sewn onto mannish tweed coats. The romantic quotient, on the other hand, seemed slightly tamed by the designer's own poetic standards, as he moved into more tailoring and even sports inflected silhouettes like anoraks, bomber jackets and military-tinged coats. The arts and craft soul of this designer can never be fully extinguished, however. Which means that there was still plenty of pretty pleated chiffon, macramé lace and fancy crystal cages transforming the menswear touches into artfully detailed collages.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Antonio Marras

Antonio Marras is Milan's resident romantic and consistently one of our favourite fashion talents. What one sees on the Marras runway never emerges anywhere else in Milan, making his art-tinged collections all the more special. This season the Sardinian designer took snow-jumping wolves as his inspiration. Images of the woodsy creatures were printed onto duchesse satin, beaded onto intricate chain mail, and recreated like illustrations on the front of crystal-covered knitwear. Even the models' hair had a touch of the wild, wrapped as they were into waves on either side of the head that resembled fox ears. The workmanship at a Marras show is always something to behold and this season he made magical layers of fur, embroidery and sturdy wools such as a pink furry panel covered in jet embroidered and sewn onto mannish tweed coats. The romantic quotient, on the other hand, seemed slightly tamed by the designer's own poetic standards, as he moved into more tailoring and even sports inflected silhouettes like anoraks, bomber jackets and military-tinged coats. The arts and craft soul of this designer can never be fully extinguished, however. Which means that there was still plenty of pretty pleated chiffon, macramé lace and fancy crystal cages transforming the menswear touches into artfully detailed collages.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Antonio Marras

Antonio Marras is Milan's resident romantic and consistently one of our favourite fashion talents. What one sees on the Marras runway never emerges anywhere else in Milan, making his art-tinged collections all the more special. This season the Sardinian designer took snow-jumping wolves as his inspiration. Images of the woodsy creatures were printed onto duchesse satin, beaded onto intricate chain mail, and recreated like illustrations on the front of crystal-covered knitwear. Even the models' hair had a touch of the wild, wrapped as they were into waves on either side of the head that resembled fox ears. The workmanship at a Marras show is always something to behold and this season he made magical layers of fur, embroidery and sturdy wools such as a pink furry panel covered in jet embroidered and sewn onto mannish tweed coats. The romantic quotient, on the other hand, seemed slightly tamed by the designer's own poetic standards, as he moved into more tailoring and even sports inflected silhouettes like anoraks, bomber jackets and military-tinged coats. The arts and craft soul of this designer can never be fully extinguished, however. Which means that there was still plenty of pretty pleated chiffon, macramé lace and fancy crystal cages transforming the menswear touches into artfully detailed collages.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Antonio Marras

Antonio Marras is Milan's resident romantic and consistently one of our favourite fashion talents. What one sees on the Marras runway never emerges anywhere else in Milan, making his art-tinged collections all the more special. This season the Sardinian designer took snow-jumping wolves as his inspiration. Images of the woodsy creatures were printed onto duchesse satin, beaded onto intricate chain mail, and recreated like illustrations on the front of crystal-covered knitwear. Even the models' hair had a touch of the wild, wrapped as they were into waves on either side of the head that resembled fox ears. The workmanship at a Marras show is always something to behold and this season he made magical layers of fur, embroidery and sturdy wools such as a pink furry panel covered in jet embroidered and sewn onto mannish tweed coats. The romantic quotient, on the other hand, seemed slightly tamed by the designer's own poetic standards, as he moved into more tailoring and even sports inflected silhouettes like anoraks, bomber jackets and military-tinged coats. The arts and craft soul of this designer can never be fully extinguished, however. Which means that there was still plenty of pretty pleated chiffon, macramé lace and fancy crystal cages transforming the menswear touches into artfully detailed collages.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Jil Sander

As Jil Sander continues to conduct its ongoing search for a new creative director, the in-house design team is charged with carrying on the flame of the house's founding designer. For pre-collections that is a non-issue but for the runway, where a kinetic sort of energy is required to inspire viewers in a live audience, it can present more of a challenge. Certainly all of the clothes we saw on this Winter runway were beautifully cut and crafted, doing justice to the twin pillar trademarks of this purist-minded brand. They featured Sander's signature clean lines, but were softly updated with tucks across shift dress fronts, or in the new longer dress shape that was taught across the hips but loose around the chest. The palette was a range of deeply muted pastels, as if only a drop of sea green, lavender or pink grapefruit had been dropped into a pool of white ink. As a whole, the collection was subtle, soft and at times lovely. But we look forward to the days when a Jil Sander show jolts us out of our seats into the wonderful surprises of avant-garde design.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Jil Sander

As Jil Sander continues to conduct its ongoing search for a new creative director, the in-house design team is charged with carrying on the flame of the house's founding designer. For pre-collections that is a non-issue but for the runway, where a kinetic sort of energy is required to inspire viewers in a live audience, it can present more of a challenge. Certainly all of the clothes we saw on this Winter runway were beautifully cut and crafted, doing justice to the twin pillar trademarks of this purist-minded brand. They featured Sander's signature clean lines, but were softly updated with tucks across shift dress fronts, or in the new longer dress shape that was taught across the hips but loose around the chest. The palette was a range of deeply muted pastels, as if only a drop of sea green, lavender or pink grapefruit had been dropped into a pool of white ink. As a whole, the collection was subtle, soft and at times lovely. But we look forward to the days when a Jil Sander show jolts us out of our seats into the wonderful surprises of avant-garde design.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Jil Sander

As Jil Sander continues to conduct its ongoing search for a new creative director, the in-house design team is charged with carrying on the flame of the house's founding designer. For pre-collections that is a non-issue but for the runway, where a kinetic sort of energy is required to inspire viewers in a live audience, it can present more of a challenge. Certainly all of the clothes we saw on this Winter runway were beautifully cut and crafted, doing justice to the twin pillar trademarks of this purist-minded brand. They featured Sander's signature clean lines, but were softly updated with tucks across shift dress fronts, or in the new longer dress shape that was taught across the hips but loose around the chest. The palette was a range of deeply muted pastels, as if only a drop of sea green, lavender or pink grapefruit had been dropped into a pool of white ink. As a whole, the collection was subtle, soft and at times lovely. But we look forward to the days when a Jil Sander show jolts us out of our seats into the wonderful surprises of avant-garde design.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Jil Sander

As Jil Sander continues to conduct its ongoing search for a new creative director, the in-house design team is charged with carrying on the flame of the house's founding designer. For pre-collections that is a non-issue but for the runway, where a kinetic sort of energy is required to inspire viewers in a live audience, it can present more of a challenge. Certainly all of the clothes we saw on this Winter runway were beautifully cut and crafted, doing justice to the twin pillar trademarks of this purist-minded brand. They featured Sander's signature clean lines, but were softly updated with tucks across shift dress fronts, or in the new longer dress shape that was taught across the hips but loose around the chest. The palette was a range of deeply muted pastels, as if only a drop of sea green, lavender or pink grapefruit had been dropped into a pool of white ink. As a whole, the collection was subtle, soft and at times lovely. But we look forward to the days when a Jil Sander show jolts us out of our seats into the wonderful surprises of avant-garde design.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Jil Sander

As Jil Sander continues to conduct its ongoing search for a new creative director, the in-house design team is charged with carrying on the flame of the house's founding designer. For pre-collections that is a non-issue but for the runway, where a kinetic sort of energy is required to inspire viewers in a live audience, it can present more of a challenge. Certainly all of the clothes we saw on this Winter runway were beautifully cut and crafted, doing justice to the twin pillar trademarks of this purist-minded brand. They featured Sander's signature clean lines, but were softly updated with tucks across shift dress fronts, or in the new longer dress shape that was taught across the hips but loose around the chest. The palette was a range of deeply muted pastels, as if only a drop of sea green, lavender or pink grapefruit had been dropped into a pool of white ink. As a whole, the collection was subtle, soft and at times lovely. But we look forward to the days when a Jil Sander show jolts us out of our seats into the wonderful surprises of avant-garde design.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emilio Pucci

Peter Dundas' 'Call of the Wild' Pucci collection could have easily signified an animal print stampede for his gilded runway. In actuality, though, the Pucci girl roared with a much more sophisticated sensibility this season, playing off the noble roots of the Florentine brand, but wrapping it up in a still smoking hot package. The fil rouge in Dundas' work for this venerable Italian house is the way in which he reinterprets classic notions of print. Though he always plays with printed motifs - in this case a historic motif called 'Orchidea' - Dundas' real passion is put forth in the intricate knit patterns, the elaborate embroideries and the mouth-watering fur intarsias, all of which are a new way, his way in fact, of expressing the classic Pucci graphics. This season the motifs took on a Navajo meets Inuit tribal quality, a cross between the two cultures this half American, half Norwegian designer feels a natural affinity for. The results, especially when mixed with spotty appaloosa pony skin, yards of metal studding and racy lacy high stiletto boots, was graphic, punchy and yes, wild, but in a savage chic sort of way.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emilio Pucci

Peter Dundas' 'Call of the Wild' Pucci collection could have easily signified an animal print stampede for his gilded runway. In actuality, though, the Pucci girl roared with a much more sophisticated sensibility this season, playing off the noble roots of the Florentine brand, but wrapping it up in a still smoking hot package. The fil rouge in Dundas' work for this venerable Italian house is the way in which he reinterprets classic notions of print. Though he always plays with printed motifs - in this case a historic motif called 'Orchidea' - Dundas' real passion is put forth in the intricate knit patterns, the elaborate embroideries and the mouth-watering fur intarsias, all of which are a new way, his way in fact, of expressing the classic Pucci graphics. This season the motifs took on a Navajo meets Inuit tribal quality, a cross between the two cultures this half American, half Norwegian designer feels a natural affinity for. The results, especially when mixed with spotty appaloosa pony skin, yards of metal studding and racy lacy high stiletto boots, was graphic, punchy and yes, wild, but in a savage chic sort of way.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emilio Pucci

Peter Dundas' 'Call of the Wild' Pucci collection could have easily signified an animal print stampede for his gilded runway. In actuality, though, the Pucci girl roared with a much more sophisticated sensibility this season, playing off the noble roots of the Florentine brand, but wrapping it up in a still smoking hot package. The fil rouge in Dundas' work for this venerable Italian house is the way in which he reinterprets classic notions of print. Though he always plays with printed motifs - in this case a historic motif called 'Orchidea' - Dundas' real passion is put forth in the intricate knit patterns, the elaborate embroideries and the mouth-watering fur intarsias, all of which are a new way, his way in fact, of expressing the classic Pucci graphics. This season the motifs took on a Navajo meets Inuit tribal quality, a cross between the two cultures this half American, half Norwegian designer feels a natural affinity for. The results, especially when mixed with spotty appaloosa pony skin, yards of metal studding and racy lacy high stiletto boots, was graphic, punchy and yes, wild, but in a savage chic sort of way.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emilio Pucci

Peter Dundas' 'Call of the Wild' Pucci collection could have easily signified an animal print stampede for his gilded runway. In actuality, though, the Pucci girl roared with a much more sophisticated sensibility this season, playing off the noble roots of the Florentine brand, but wrapping it up in a still smoking hot package. The fil rouge in Dundas' work for this venerable Italian house is the way in which he reinterprets classic notions of print. Though he always plays with printed motifs - in this case a historic motif called 'Orchidea' - Dundas' real passion is put forth in the intricate knit patterns, the elaborate embroideries and the mouth-watering fur intarsias, all of which are a new way, his way in fact, of expressing the classic Pucci graphics. This season the motifs took on a Navajo meets Inuit tribal quality, a cross between the two cultures this half American, half Norwegian designer feels a natural affinity for. The results, especially when mixed with spotty appaloosa pony skin, yards of metal studding and racy lacy high stiletto boots, was graphic, punchy and yes, wild, but in a savage chic sort of way.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Emilio Pucci

Peter Dundas' 'Call of the Wild' Pucci collection could have easily signified an animal print stampede for his gilded runway. In actuality, though, the Pucci girl roared with a much more sophisticated sensibility this season, playing off the noble roots of the Florentine brand, but wrapping it up in a still smoking hot package. The fil rouge in Dundas' work for this venerable Italian house is the way in which he reinterprets classic notions of print. Though he always plays with printed motifs - in this case a historic motif called 'Orchidea' - Dundas' real passion is put forth in the intricate knit patterns, the elaborate embroideries and the mouth-watering fur intarsias, all of which are a new way, his way in fact, of expressing the classic Pucci graphics. This season the motifs took on a Navajo meets Inuit tribal quality, a cross between the two cultures this half American, half Norwegian designer feels a natural affinity for. The results, especially when mixed with spotty appaloosa pony skin, yards of metal studding and racy lacy high stiletto boots, was graphic, punchy and yes, wild, but in a savage chic sort of way.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marni

Where, oh where, to start with the Marni show? With so many twists and quick turns, new ideas and buried details, the key moments on this Winter runway defy being boxed into a single category. Let's start, then, with the model's hair that was crumpled into a tangled, wet mess and gave the girls the air of a woman who'd been confined to her bed for many days in a row. Another clue to the women's subversive state were in their mid-calf length sheer pantyhose that left the models' ankles and calves with black tattoos of tribal blocking. Clearly, the Marni woman fits into no other fashion category - least of all the bourgeois one that her home city typically exudes - and the original, art-streaked clothes on the runway, together with wavy architectural tailoring, felt right in tune with the Milanese brand's signature quirk. Creative director Consuelo Castiglioni opened the show with a dramatic unfurling of stiffened wool, or bonded jersey ruffles, cut into tiers on long skirt fronts, or as pleating on lean dresses. From there, her silhouettes grew, blowing air into bell-shaped arms and oversized skirts in substantial weighty fabrics. The eyes moved everywhere all at once, flashing from a caramel leather anorak sprouting a grass green mohair hood to spotted goats hair coats. Bold street striping, meanwhile, made for one of the season's most effective graphics, paving its way vertically up long belted coats or boiled wool suits with long column skirts. But the highlight of the show was the finale of wool dresses, coats and sweeping skirts that were panelled with a jungle's worth of grass-like feathers and fur, and topped with two-tone beaver coats. That was one thing we could have feasted our eyes on for eternity.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marni

Where, oh where, to start with the Marni show? With so many twists and quick turns, new ideas and buried details, the key moments on this Winter runway defy being boxed into a single category. Let's start, then, with the model's hair that was crumpled into a tangled, wet mess and gave the girls the air of a woman who'd been confined to her bed for many days in a row. Another clue to the women's subversive state were in their mid-calf length sheer pantyhose that left the models' ankles and calves with black tattoos of tribal blocking. Clearly, the Marni woman fits into no other fashion category - least of all the bourgeois one that her home city typically exudes - and the original, art-streaked clothes on the runway, together with wavy architectural tailoring, felt right in tune with the Milanese brand's signature quirk. Creative director Consuelo Castiglioni opened the show with a dramatic unfurling of stiffened wool, or bonded jersey ruffles, cut into tiers on long skirt fronts, or as pleating on lean dresses. From there, her silhouettes grew, blowing air into bell-shaped arms and oversized skirts in substantial weighty fabrics. The eyes moved everywhere all at once, flashing from a caramel leather anorak sprouting a grass green mohair hood to spotted goats hair coats. Bold street striping, meanwhile, made for one of the season's most effective graphics, paving its way vertically up long belted coats or boiled wool suits with long column skirts. But the highlight of the show was the finale of wool dresses, coats and sweeping skirts that were panelled with a jungle's worth of grass-like feathers and fur, and topped with two-tone beaver coats. That was one thing we could have feasted our eyes on for eternity.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marni

Where, oh where, to start with the Marni show? With so many twists and quick turns, new ideas and buried details, the key moments on this Winter runway defy being boxed into a single category. Let's start, then, with the model's hair that was crumpled into a tangled, wet mess and gave the girls the air of a woman who'd been confined to her bed for many days in a row. Another clue to the women's subversive state were in their mid-calf length sheer pantyhose that left the models' ankles and calves with black tattoos of tribal blocking. Clearly, the Marni woman fits into no other fashion category - least of all the bourgeois one that her home city typically exudes - and the original, art-streaked clothes on the runway, together with wavy architectural tailoring, felt right in tune with the Milanese brand's signature quirk. Creative director Consuelo Castiglioni opened the show with a dramatic unfurling of stiffened wool, or bonded jersey ruffles, cut into tiers on long skirt fronts, or as pleating on lean dresses. From there, her silhouettes grew, blowing air into bell-shaped arms and oversized skirts in substantial weighty fabrics. The eyes moved everywhere all at once, flashing from a caramel leather anorak sprouting a grass green mohair hood to spotted goats hair coats. Bold street striping, meanwhile, made for one of the season's most effective graphics, paving its way vertically up long belted coats or boiled wool suits with long column skirts. But the highlight of the show was the finale of wool dresses, coats and sweeping skirts that were panelled with a jungle's worth of grass-like feathers and fur, and topped with two-tone beaver coats. That was one thing we could have feasted our eyes on for eternity.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marni

Where, oh where, to start with the Marni show? With so many twists and quick turns, new ideas and buried details, the key moments on this Winter runway defy being boxed into a single category. Let's start, then, with the model's hair that was crumpled into a tangled, wet mess and gave the girls the air of a woman who'd been confined to her bed for many days in a row. Another clue to the women's subversive state were in their mid-calf length sheer pantyhose that left the models' ankles and calves with black tattoos of tribal blocking. Clearly, the Marni woman fits into no other fashion category - least of all the bourgeois one that her home city typically exudes - and the original, art-streaked clothes on the runway, together with wavy architectural tailoring, felt right in tune with the Milanese brand's signature quirk. Creative director Consuelo Castiglioni opened the show with a dramatic unfurling of stiffened wool, or bonded jersey ruffles, cut into tiers on long skirt fronts, or as pleating on lean dresses. From there, her silhouettes grew, blowing air into bell-shaped arms and oversized skirts in substantial weighty fabrics. The eyes moved everywhere all at once, flashing from a caramel leather anorak sprouting a grass green mohair hood to spotted goats hair coats. Bold street striping, meanwhile, made for one of the season's most effective graphics, paving its way vertically up long belted coats or boiled wool suits with long column skirts. But the highlight of the show was the finale of wool dresses, coats and sweeping skirts that were panelled with a jungle's worth of grass-like feathers and fur, and topped with two-tone beaver coats. That was one thing we could have feasted our eyes on for eternity.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Marni

Where, oh where, to start with the Marni show? With so many twists and quick turns, new ideas and buried details, the key moments on this Winter runway defy being boxed into a single category. Let's start, then, with the model's hair that was crumpled into a tangled, wet mess and gave the girls the air of a woman who'd been confined to her bed for many days in a row. Another clue to the women's subversive state were in their mid-calf length sheer pantyhose that left the models' ankles and calves with black tattoos of tribal blocking. Clearly, the Marni woman fits into no other fashion category - least of all the bourgeois one that her home city typically exudes - and the original, art-streaked clothes on the runway, together with wavy architectural tailoring, felt right in tune with the Milanese brand's signature quirk. Creative director Consuelo Castiglioni opened the show with a dramatic unfurling of stiffened wool, or bonded jersey ruffles, cut into tiers on long skirt fronts, or as pleating on lean dresses. From there, her silhouettes grew, blowing air into bell-shaped arms and oversized skirts in substantial weighty fabrics. The eyes moved everywhere all at once, flashing from a caramel leather anorak sprouting a grass green mohair hood to spotted goats hair coats. Bold street striping, meanwhile, made for one of the season's most effective graphics, paving its way vertically up long belted coats or boiled wool suits with long column skirts. But the highlight of the show was the finale of wool dresses, coats and sweeping skirts that were panelled with a jungle's worth of grass-like feathers and fur, and topped with two-tone beaver coats. That was one thing we could have feasted our eyes on for eternity.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Missoni

A part from inebriating her guests with a scrumptious pre-show bowl of pure chocolate mousse, Angela Missoni also treated them to a read of her Missoni Moments newspaper, which gave a recipe for an orange fennel salad amongst other juicy tidbits. It wasn't just a gourmand afternoon at Missoni (although that is never a problem for us). The four-page mini sheet also gave a clue into the collection in a photograph of a shaggy carpet that informed the majority of the pattern work on the clothes this season. The broken puzzle piece configuration of the carpet, which featured oversized shards of white trimmed dusty colours, was a smooth move for Missoni this season. It gave a graphic edge to the clothes and looked especially alluring on long, full circle skirts, or on ribbed knit dresses that fell like a column to the floor. Missoni played with blocks of colour throughout, tossing in aqua astrakhan hues over coats, red ribbed cuffs on dresses, or egg yolk yellow curled lambs wool on the earflaps of wool caps. The house's signature zigs and zags came abstracted this season in bright mandarin and rust, while pops of citrus tones was scattered in slivers of plastic appliqués across dress fronts. The mood, however, was playfully boyish as cropped cargo pants, track pants, parkas and degrade crew neck sweaters all built towards an off-duty, sporty uniform. Soft, fleecy fabrics aided Missoni in achieving cosy silhouettes, and when they clung to the body such as on ribbed tube dresses or thermal style tops, they came in striking intarsia colour patterns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Missoni

A part from inebriating her guests with a scrumptious pre-show bowl of pure chocolate mousse, Angela Missoni also treated them to a read of her Missoni Moments newspaper, which gave a recipe for an orange fennel salad amongst other juicy tidbits. It wasn't just a gourmand afternoon at Missoni (although that is never a problem for us). The four-page mini sheet also gave a clue into the collection in a photograph of a shaggy carpet that informed the majority of the pattern work on the clothes this season. The broken puzzle piece configuration of the carpet, which featured oversized shards of white trimmed dusty colours, was a smooth move for Missoni this season. It gave a graphic edge to the clothes and looked especially alluring on long, full circle skirts, or on ribbed knit dresses that fell like a column to the floor. Missoni played with blocks of colour throughout, tossing in aqua astrakhan hues over coats, red ribbed cuffs on dresses, or egg yolk yellow curled lambs wool on the earflaps of wool caps. The house's signature zigs and zags came abstracted this season in bright mandarin and rust, while pops of citrus tones was scattered in slivers of plastic appliqués across dress fronts. The mood, however, was playfully boyish as cropped cargo pants, track pants, parkas and degrade crew neck sweaters all built towards an off-duty, sporty uniform. Soft, fleecy fabrics aided Missoni in achieving cosy silhouettes, and when they clung to the body such as on ribbed tube dresses or thermal style tops, they came in striking intarsia colour patterns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Missoni

A part from inebriating her guests with a scrumptious pre-show bowl of pure chocolate mousse, Angela Missoni also treated them to a read of her Missoni Moments newspaper, which gave a recipe for an orange fennel salad amongst other juicy tidbits. It wasn't just a gourmand afternoon at Missoni (although that is never a problem for us). The four-page mini sheet also gave a clue into the collection in a photograph of a shaggy carpet that informed the majority of the pattern work on the clothes this season. The broken puzzle piece configuration of the carpet, which featured oversized shards of white trimmed dusty colours, was a smooth move for Missoni this season. It gave a graphic edge to the clothes and looked especially alluring on long, full circle skirts, or on ribbed knit dresses that fell like a column to the floor. Missoni played with blocks of colour throughout, tossing in aqua astrakhan hues over coats, red ribbed cuffs on dresses, or egg yolk yellow curled lambs wool on the earflaps of wool caps. The house's signature zigs and zags came abstracted this season in bright mandarin and rust, while pops of citrus tones was scattered in slivers of plastic appliqués across dress fronts. The mood, however, was playfully boyish as cropped cargo pants, track pants, parkas and degrade crew neck sweaters all built towards an off-duty, sporty uniform. Soft, fleecy fabrics aided Missoni in achieving cosy silhouettes, and when they clung to the body such as on ribbed tube dresses or thermal style tops, they came in striking intarsia colour patterns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Missoni

A part from inebriating her guests with a scrumptious pre-show bowl of pure chocolate mousse, Angela Missoni also treated them to a read of her Missoni Moments newspaper, which gave a recipe for an orange fennel salad amongst other juicy tidbits. It wasn't just a gourmand afternoon at Missoni (although that is never a problem for us). The four-page mini sheet also gave a clue into the collection in a photograph of a shaggy carpet that informed the majority of the pattern work on the clothes this season. The broken puzzle piece configuration of the carpet, which featured oversized shards of white trimmed dusty colours, was a smooth move for Missoni this season. It gave a graphic edge to the clothes and looked especially alluring on long, full circle skirts, or on ribbed knit dresses that fell like a column to the floor. Missoni played with blocks of colour throughout, tossing in aqua astrakhan hues over coats, red ribbed cuffs on dresses, or egg yolk yellow curled lambs wool on the earflaps of wool caps. The house's signature zigs and zags came abstracted this season in bright mandarin and rust, while pops of citrus tones was scattered in slivers of plastic appliqués across dress fronts. The mood, however, was playfully boyish as cropped cargo pants, track pants, parkas and degrade crew neck sweaters all built towards an off-duty, sporty uniform. Soft, fleecy fabrics aided Missoni in achieving cosy silhouettes, and when they clung to the body such as on ribbed tube dresses or thermal style tops, they came in striking intarsia colour patterns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Missoni

A part from inebriating her guests with a scrumptious pre-show bowl of pure chocolate mousse, Angela Missoni also treated them to a read of her Missoni Moments newspaper, which gave a recipe for an orange fennel salad amongst other juicy tidbits. It wasn't just a gourmand afternoon at Missoni (although that is never a problem for us). The four-page mini sheet also gave a clue into the collection in a photograph of a shaggy carpet that informed the majority of the pattern work on the clothes this season. The broken puzzle piece configuration of the carpet, which featured oversized shards of white trimmed dusty colours, was a smooth move for Missoni this season. It gave a graphic edge to the clothes and looked especially alluring on long, full circle skirts, or on ribbed knit dresses that fell like a column to the floor. Missoni played with blocks of colour throughout, tossing in aqua astrakhan hues over coats, red ribbed cuffs on dresses, or egg yolk yellow curled lambs wool on the earflaps of wool caps. The house's signature zigs and zags came abstracted this season in bright mandarin and rust, while pops of citrus tones was scattered in slivers of plastic appliqués across dress fronts. The mood, however, was playfully boyish as cropped cargo pants, track pants, parkas and degrade crew neck sweaters all built towards an off-duty, sporty uniform. Soft, fleecy fabrics aided Missoni in achieving cosy silhouettes, and when they clung to the body such as on ribbed tube dresses or thermal style tops, they came in striking intarsia colour patterns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

The normally pitch-black, felt lined show space at Salvatore Ferragamo was replaced this season with an eye-blinding, all-white room that was so piercing it turned blonde hair a futuristic neon yellow-green. But the bright light served a fundamental purpose this season, allowing every line and detail of creative director Massimiliano Giornetti's microscopically constructed collection to arise from their surfaces in high focus. Giornetti has been on a roll recently, but this was a show in which he had editors' mouths literally agape in sheer desire over the clothing and accessories passing before their eyes. The lines this season were long, clean and tailored into sharpened edges. Knife pleating took on an eerie, precise air with iridescent coatings that clung to surfaces, creating striking sunburst formations on long skirts or sleek turtleneck dresses. Tailored pieces, meanwhile, were as sharp as the models side hair parts and their sturdy block-heeled boots, all of which looked as if they had been cut with a scalpel. A terrific funnel neck tartan cape, cut long in front and cropped in the back, opened the show and began a parade of outerwear that grew rousingly in complexity and beauty. Standouts included the leopard print mohair cape that bled from black to rust, a crocodile belted coat glossed to perfection, and a sleeveless coat that morphed from astrakhan to wool to long-haired fox all in the same beguiling garment. It was, all in all, a complete triumph for Giornetti and the Florentine fashion house of Ferragamo and brought to the forefront exactly what the Italians do best.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

The normally pitch-black, felt lined show space at Salvatore Ferragamo was replaced this season with an eye-blinding, all-white room that was so piercing it turned blonde hair a futuristic neon yellow-green. But the bright light served a fundamental purpose this season, allowing every line and detail of creative director Massimiliano Giornetti's microscopically constructed collection to arise from their surfaces in high focus. Giornetti has been on a roll recently, but this was a show in which he had editors' mouths literally agape in sheer desire over the clothing and accessories passing before their eyes. The lines this season were long, clean and tailored into sharpened edges. Knife pleating took on an eerie, precise air with iridescent coatings that clung to surfaces, creating striking sunburst formations on long skirts or sleek turtleneck dresses. Tailored pieces, meanwhile, were as sharp as the models side hair parts and their sturdy block-heeled boots, all of which looked as if they had been cut with a scalpel. A terrific funnel neck tartan cape, cut long in front and cropped in the back, opened the show and began a parade of outerwear that grew rousingly in complexity and beauty. Standouts included the leopard print mohair cape that bled from black to rust, a crocodile belted coat glossed to perfection, and a sleeveless coat that morphed from astrakhan to wool to long-haired fox all in the same beguiling garment. It was, all in all, a complete triumph for Giornetti and the Florentine fashion house of Ferragamo and brought to the forefront exactly what the Italians do best.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

The normally pitch-black, felt lined show space at Salvatore Ferragamo was replaced this season with an eye-blinding, all-white room that was so piercing it turned blonde hair a futuristic neon yellow-green. But the bright light served a fundamental purpose this season, allowing every line and detail of creative director Massimiliano Giornetti's microscopically constructed collection to arise from their surfaces in high focus. Giornetti has been on a roll recently, but this was a show in which he had editors' mouths literally agape in sheer desire over the clothing and accessories passing before their eyes. The lines this season were long, clean and tailored into sharpened edges. Knife pleating took on an eerie, precise air with iridescent coatings that clung to surfaces, creating striking sunburst formations on long skirts or sleek turtleneck dresses. Tailored pieces, meanwhile, were as sharp as the models side hair parts and their sturdy block-heeled boots, all of which looked as if they had been cut with a scalpel. A terrific funnel neck tartan cape, cut long in front and cropped in the back, opened the show and began a parade of outerwear that grew rousingly in complexity and beauty. Standouts included the leopard print mohair cape that bled from black to rust, a crocodile belted coat glossed to perfection, and a sleeveless coat that morphed from astrakhan to wool to long-haired fox all in the same beguiling garment. It was, all in all, a complete triumph for Giornetti and the Florentine fashion house of Ferragamo and brought to the forefront exactly what the Italians do best.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

The normally pitch-black, felt lined show space at Salvatore Ferragamo was replaced this season with an eye-blinding, all-white room that was so piercing it turned blonde hair a futuristic neon yellow-green. But the bright light served a fundamental purpose this season, allowing every line and detail of creative director Massimiliano Giornetti's microscopically constructed collection to arise from their surfaces in high focus. Giornetti has been on a roll recently, but this was a show in which he had editors' mouths literally agape in sheer desire over the clothing and accessories passing before their eyes. The lines this season were long, clean and tailored into sharpened edges. Knife pleating took on an eerie, precise air with iridescent coatings that clung to surfaces, creating striking sunburst formations on long skirts or sleek turtleneck dresses. Tailored pieces, meanwhile, were as sharp as the models side hair parts and their sturdy block-heeled boots, all of which looked as if they had been cut with a scalpel. A terrific funnel neck tartan cape, cut long in front and cropped in the back, opened the show and began a parade of outerwear that grew rousingly in complexity and beauty. Standouts included the leopard print mohair cape that bled from black to rust, a crocodile belted coat glossed to perfection, and a sleeveless coat that morphed from astrakhan to wool to long-haired fox all in the same beguiling garment. It was, all in all, a complete triumph for Giornetti and the Florentine fashion house of Ferragamo and brought to the forefront exactly what the Italians do best.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Salvatore Ferragamo

The normally pitch-black, felt lined show space at Salvatore Ferragamo was replaced this season with an eye-blinding, all-white room that was so piercing it turned blonde hair a futuristic neon yellow-green. But the bright light served a fundamental purpose this season, allowing every line and detail of creative director Massimiliano Giornetti's microscopically constructed collection to arise from their surfaces in high focus. Giornetti has been on a roll recently, but this was a show in which he had editors' mouths literally agape in sheer desire over the clothing and accessories passing before their eyes. The lines this season were long, clean and tailored into sharpened edges. Knife pleating took on an eerie, precise air with iridescent coatings that clung to surfaces, creating striking sunburst formations on long skirts or sleek turtleneck dresses. Tailored pieces, meanwhile, were as sharp as the models side hair parts and their sturdy block-heeled boots, all of which looked as if they had been cut with a scalpel. A terrific funnel neck tartan cape, cut long in front and cropped in the back, opened the show and began a parade of outerwear that grew rousingly in complexity and beauty. Standouts included the leopard print mohair cape that bled from black to rust, a crocodile belted coat glossed to perfection, and a sleeveless coat that morphed from astrakhan to wool to long-haired fox all in the same beguiling garment. It was, all in all, a complete triumph for Giornetti and the Florentine fashion house of Ferragamo and brought to the forefront exactly what the Italians do best.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

MSGM

Massimo Giorgetti is Milan's official rising star, as a throng of breathless 20-something Italians pushing their way into his show last night proved beyond a doubt. The designer's winning formula has been his ability to condense high fashion themes into low(er) price packages, creating a sturdy middle ground that knocks the socks off those cheap finds found at Zara and H&M. Print and surface detail have been his key weapons in his speedy ascent, but this season the Milan-based designer relied more on unusual layering to achieve his new look. Leather leggings and patent leather tassel-topped flat mules, both of which were thrown under half of the looks, lowered the quotient of MSGM's signature femininity and instead added a street edge this season. But underneath the layers of shiny, latex skirting and mirror-crusted sweatshirts, there were plenty of nuggets of refinement. A skirt dangled with lovely light-as-air metal coins, while a camel hair coat faded brilliantly to needle punched soft pink astrakhan. Our favourite part of the collection was Giorgetti's trick blending jacquards with prints. The pieces that opened his show, for example, featured wonderfully crinkled jacquard backs that bled seamlessly into digitised prints that dripped with pattern. They were just the sort of thing that shows what Giorgetti can achieve technically without breaking his clients' bank accounts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

MSGM

Massimo Giorgetti is Milan's official rising star, as a throng of breathless 20-something Italians pushing their way into his show last night proved beyond a doubt. The designer's winning formula has been his ability to condense high fashion themes into low(er) price packages, creating a sturdy middle ground that knocks the socks off those cheap finds found at Zara and H&M. Print and surface detail have been his key weapons in his speedy ascent, but this season the Milan-based designer relied more on unusual layering to achieve his new look. Leather leggings and patent leather tassel-topped flat mules, both of which were thrown under half of the looks, lowered the quotient of MSGM's signature femininity and instead added a street edge this season. But underneath the layers of shiny, latex skirting and mirror-crusted sweatshirts, there were plenty of nuggets of refinement. A skirt dangled with lovely light-as-air metal coins, while a camel hair coat faded brilliantly to needle punched soft pink astrakhan. Our favourite part of the collection was Giorgetti's trick blending jacquards with prints. The pieces that opened his show, for example, featured wonderfully crinkled jacquard backs that bled seamlessly into digitised prints that dripped with pattern. They were just the sort of thing that shows what Giorgetti can achieve technically without breaking his clients' bank accounts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

MSGM

Massimo Giorgetti is Milan's official rising star, as a throng of breathless 20-something Italians pushing their way into his show last night proved beyond a doubt. The designer's winning formula has been his ability to condense high fashion themes into low(er) price packages, creating a sturdy middle ground that knocks the socks off those cheap finds found at Zara and H&M. Print and surface detail have been his key weapons in his speedy ascent, but this season the Milan-based designer relied more on unusual layering to achieve his new look. Leather leggings and patent leather tassel-topped flat mules, both of which were thrown under half of the looks, lowered the quotient of MSGM's signature femininity and instead added a street edge this season. But underneath the layers of shiny, latex skirting and mirror-crusted sweatshirts, there were plenty of nuggets of refinement. A skirt dangled with lovely light-as-air metal coins, while a camel hair coat faded brilliantly to needle punched soft pink astrakhan. Our favourite part of the collection was Giorgetti's trick blending jacquards with prints. The pieces that opened his show, for example, featured wonderfully crinkled jacquard backs that bled seamlessly into digitised prints that dripped with pattern. They were just the sort of thing that shows what Giorgetti can achieve technically without breaking his clients' bank accounts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

MSGM

Massimo Giorgetti is Milan's official rising star, as a throng of breathless 20-something Italians pushing their way into his show last night proved beyond a doubt. The designer's winning formula has been his ability to condense high fashion themes into low(er) price packages, creating a sturdy middle ground that knocks the socks off those cheap finds found at Zara and H&M. Print and surface detail have been his key weapons in his speedy ascent, but this season the Milan-based designer relied more on unusual layering to achieve his new look. Leather leggings and patent leather tassel-topped flat mules, both of which were thrown under half of the looks, lowered the quotient of MSGM's signature femininity and instead added a street edge this season. But underneath the layers of shiny, latex skirting and mirror-crusted sweatshirts, there were plenty of nuggets of refinement. A skirt dangled with lovely light-as-air metal coins, while a camel hair coat faded brilliantly to needle punched soft pink astrakhan. Our favourite part of the collection was Giorgetti's trick blending jacquards with prints. The pieces that opened his show, for example, featured wonderfully crinkled jacquard backs that bled seamlessly into digitised prints that dripped with pattern. They were just the sort of thing that shows what Giorgetti can achieve technically without breaking his clients' bank accounts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

MSGM

Massimo Giorgetti is Milan's official rising star, as a throng of breathless 20-something Italians pushing their way into his show last night proved beyond a doubt. The designer's winning formula has been his ability to condense high fashion themes into low(er) price packages, creating a sturdy middle ground that knocks the socks off those cheap finds found at Zara and H&M. Print and surface detail have been his key weapons in his speedy ascent, but this season the Milan-based designer relied more on unusual layering to achieve his new look. Leather leggings and patent leather tassel-topped flat mules, both of which were thrown under half of the looks, lowered the quotient of MSGM's signature femininity and instead added a street edge this season. But underneath the layers of shiny, latex skirting and mirror-crusted sweatshirts, there were plenty of nuggets of refinement. A skirt dangled with lovely light-as-air metal coins, while a camel hair coat faded brilliantly to needle punched soft pink astrakhan. Our favourite part of the collection was Giorgetti's trick blending jacquards with prints. The pieces that opened his show, for example, featured wonderfully crinkled jacquard backs that bled seamlessly into digitised prints that dripped with pattern. They were just the sort of thing that shows what Giorgetti can achieve technically without breaking his clients' bank accounts.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Dsquared²

Girl, Interrupted - remember that 1999 film? Now imagine Angelina Jolie and Winona Ryder strutting around the gritty halls of a psych ward in six-inch spike heels, wrapped up in mink with bed-matted hair coiffed in posh chignons. With that in mind, you may have an inkling of the humour-laden fantasy that unfurled across this season's Dsquared² runway. Twin brothers Dean and Dan Caten first introduced the looney bin lock-up as a set for their menswear outing last month in Milan, but they twisted it for the women's presentation into a completely different scene. First off, we were treated to a pre-show short video in which highly maintained women in cocktail dresses slowly unravelled in the confines of clinical bedrooms. Even Dean Caten made a cameo, literally crawling up the walls in high-heeled shoes. Most women let themselves go once shielded from the public eye but the Dsquared² models - both in the video and on the live psych ward set - were in their most elegant finery. Bathed in feathers, fur and oversized crystal embellishment, it looked as if they had a breakdown in the middle of a grand ballroom and were checked into the runway. This was without a doubt the most sophisticated and technically complex collection that the pair have ever produced. It proved that no matter how young at heart these two fun-loving designers are, they also know how to make some seriously grown-up clothes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Dsquared²

Girl, Interrupted - remember that 1999 film? Now imagine Angelina Jolie and Winona Ryder strutting around the gritty halls of a psych ward in six-inch spike heels, wrapped up in mink with bed-matted hair coiffed in posh chignons. With that in mind, you may have an inkling of the humour-laden fantasy that unfurled across this season's Dsquared² runway. Twin brothers Dean and Dan Caten first introduced the looney bin lock-up as a set for their menswear outing last month in Milan, but they twisted it for the women's presentation into a completely different scene. First off, we were treated to a pre-show short video in which highly maintained women in cocktail dresses slowly unravelled in the confines of clinical bedrooms. Even Dean Caten made a cameo, literally crawling up the walls in high-heeled shoes. Most women let themselves go once shielded from the public eye but the Dsquared² models - both in the video and on the live psych ward set - were in their most elegant finery. Bathed in feathers, fur and oversized crystal embellishment, it looked as if they had a breakdown in the middle of a grand ballroom and were checked into the runway. This was without a doubt the most sophisticated and technically complex collection that the pair have ever produced. It proved that no matter how young at heart these two fun-loving designers are, they also know how to make some seriously grown-up clothes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Dsquared²

Girl, Interrupted - remember that 1999 film? Now imagine Angelina Jolie and Winona Ryder strutting around the gritty halls of a psych ward in six-inch spike heels, wrapped up in mink with bed-matted hair coiffed in posh chignons. With that in mind, you may have an inkling of the humour-laden fantasy that unfurled across this season's Dsquared² runway. Twin brothers Dean and Dan Caten first introduced the looney bin lock-up as a set for their menswear outing last month in Milan, but they twisted it for the women's presentation into a completely different scene. First off, we were treated to a pre-show short video in which highly maintained women in cocktail dresses slowly unravelled in the confines of clinical bedrooms. Even Dean Caten made a cameo, literally crawling up the walls in high-heeled shoes. Most women let themselves go once shielded from the public eye but the Dsquared² models - both in the video and on the live psych ward set - were in their most elegant finery. Bathed in feathers, fur and oversized crystal embellishment, it looked as if they had a breakdown in the middle of a grand ballroom and were checked into the runway. This was without a doubt the most sophisticated and technically complex collection that the pair have ever produced. It proved that no matter how young at heart these two fun-loving designers are, they also know how to make some seriously grown-up clothes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Dsquared²

Girl, Interrupted - remember that 1999 film? Now imagine Angelina Jolie and Winona Ryder strutting around the gritty halls of a psych ward in six-inch spike heels, wrapped up in mink with bed-matted hair coiffed in posh chignons. With that in mind, you may have an inkling of the humour-laden fantasy that unfurled across this season's Dsquared² runway. Twin brothers Dean and Dan Caten first introduced the looney bin lock-up as a set for their menswear outing last month in Milan, but they twisted it for the women's presentation into a completely different scene. First off, we were treated to a pre-show short video in which highly maintained women in cocktail dresses slowly unravelled in the confines of clinical bedrooms. Even Dean Caten made a cameo, literally crawling up the walls in high-heeled shoes. Most women let themselves go once shielded from the public eye but the Dsquared² models - both in the video and on the live psych ward set - were in their most elegant finery. Bathed in feathers, fur and oversized crystal embellishment, it looked as if they had a breakdown in the middle of a grand ballroom and were checked into the runway. This was without a doubt the most sophisticated and technically complex collection that the pair have ever produced. It proved that no matter how young at heart these two fun-loving designers are, they also know how to make some seriously grown-up clothes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Dsquared²

Girl, Interrupted - remember that 1999 film? Now imagine Angelina Jolie and Winona Ryder strutting around the gritty halls of a psych ward in six-inch spike heels, wrapped up in mink with bed-matted hair coiffed in posh chignons. With that in mind, you may have an inkling of the humour-laden fantasy that unfurled across this season's Dsquared² runway. Twin brothers Dean and Dan Caten first introduced the looney bin lock-up as a set for their menswear outing last month in Milan, but they twisted it for the women's presentation into a completely different scene. First off, we were treated to a pre-show short video in which highly maintained women in cocktail dresses slowly unravelled in the confines of clinical bedrooms. Even Dean Caten made a cameo, literally crawling up the walls in high-heeled shoes. Most women let themselves go once shielded from the public eye but the Dsquared² models - both in the video and on the live psych ward set - were in their most elegant finery. Bathed in feathers, fur and oversized crystal embellishment, it looked as if they had a breakdown in the middle of a grand ballroom and were checked into the runway. This was without a doubt the most sophisticated and technically complex collection that the pair have ever produced. It proved that no matter how young at heart these two fun-loving designers are, they also know how to make some seriously grown-up clothes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani dropped several pre-show hints about his Winter collection theme this season, beginning with the shocking lime coloured invitation. The theme continued into his show space where the curtain backdrop held a mellow yellow glow, finishing with a flourish underfoot with the runway illuminated in neon as the model's took their first steps. The fashion subject, obviously, was chartreuse and Armani gripped onto it with tenacious exactitude, allowing only black and shades of grey into the party. This was a wise move on the veteran designer's part, as the punchy brightness was set off beautifully with the neutral tones. Though he worked in all manner of material from slinky silk jerseys to slouchy velvets, the strongest part of the collection was his experimentation with heavier wools and cashmeres. These sturdier fabrications are not normally explored on an Armani runway, but they looked beautiful when cut into modern shapes such as in the swing jackets and trapeze coats, where deep black faded gracefully into increasingly lighter shades of grey, before melting into a soothing shade of lemon chiffon. Armani also tamed wilder shades of yellow with sheer cages of black chiffon, which calmed the hue's loudness to a quiet roar. He finished with a lovely line up of crystal-embroidered gowns, each one a testament to this designer's prowess when it comes to putting Hollywood actresses in Oscar gowns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani dropped several pre-show hints about his Winter collection theme this season, beginning with the shocking lime coloured invitation. The theme continued into his show space where the curtain backdrop held a mellow yellow glow, finishing with a flourish underfoot with the runway illuminated in neon as the model's took their first steps. The fashion subject, obviously, was chartreuse and Armani gripped onto it with tenacious exactitude, allowing only black and shades of grey into the party. This was a wise move on the veteran designer's part, as the punchy brightness was set off beautifully with the neutral tones. Though he worked in all manner of material from slinky silk jerseys to slouchy velvets, the strongest part of the collection was his experimentation with heavier wools and cashmeres. These sturdier fabrications are not normally explored on an Armani runway, but they looked beautiful when cut into modern shapes such as in the swing jackets and trapeze coats, where deep black faded gracefully into increasingly lighter shades of grey, before melting into a soothing shade of lemon chiffon. Armani also tamed wilder shades of yellow with sheer cages of black chiffon, which calmed the hue's loudness to a quiet roar. He finished with a lovely line up of crystal-embroidered gowns, each one a testament to this designer's prowess when it comes to putting Hollywood actresses in Oscar gowns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani dropped several pre-show hints about his Winter collection theme this season, beginning with the shocking lime coloured invitation. The theme continued into his show space where the curtain backdrop held a mellow yellow glow, finishing with a flourish underfoot with the runway illuminated in neon as the model's took their first steps. The fashion subject, obviously, was chartreuse and Armani gripped onto it with tenacious exactitude, allowing only black and shades of grey into the party. This was a wise move on the veteran designer's part, as the punchy brightness was set off beautifully with the neutral tones. Though he worked in all manner of material from slinky silk jerseys to slouchy velvets, the strongest part of the collection was his experimentation with heavier wools and cashmeres. These sturdier fabrications are not normally explored on an Armani runway, but they looked beautiful when cut into modern shapes such as in the swing jackets and trapeze coats, where deep black faded gracefully into increasingly lighter shades of grey, before melting into a soothing shade of lemon chiffon. Armani also tamed wilder shades of yellow with sheer cages of black chiffon, which calmed the hue's loudness to a quiet roar. He finished with a lovely line up of crystal-embroidered gowns, each one a testament to this designer's prowess when it comes to putting Hollywood actresses in Oscar gowns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani dropped several pre-show hints about his Winter collection theme this season, beginning with the shocking lime coloured invitation. The theme continued into his show space where the curtain backdrop held a mellow yellow glow, finishing with a flourish underfoot with the runway illuminated in neon as the model's took their first steps. The fashion subject, obviously, was chartreuse and Armani gripped onto it with tenacious exactitude, allowing only black and shades of grey into the party. This was a wise move on the veteran designer's part, as the punchy brightness was set off beautifully with the neutral tones. Though he worked in all manner of material from slinky silk jerseys to slouchy velvets, the strongest part of the collection was his experimentation with heavier wools and cashmeres. These sturdier fabrications are not normally explored on an Armani runway, but they looked beautiful when cut into modern shapes such as in the swing jackets and trapeze coats, where deep black faded gracefully into increasingly lighter shades of grey, before melting into a soothing shade of lemon chiffon. Armani also tamed wilder shades of yellow with sheer cages of black chiffon, which calmed the hue's loudness to a quiet roar. He finished with a lovely line up of crystal-embroidered gowns, each one a testament to this designer's prowess when it comes to putting Hollywood actresses in Oscar gowns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Giorgio Armani

Giorgio Armani dropped several pre-show hints about his Winter collection theme this season, beginning with the shocking lime coloured invitation. The theme continued into his show space where the curtain backdrop held a mellow yellow glow, finishing with a flourish underfoot with the runway illuminated in neon as the model's took their first steps. The fashion subject, obviously, was chartreuse and Armani gripped onto it with tenacious exactitude, allowing only black and shades of grey into the party. This was a wise move on the veteran designer's part, as the punchy brightness was set off beautifully with the neutral tones. Though he worked in all manner of material from slinky silk jerseys to slouchy velvets, the strongest part of the collection was his experimentation with heavier wools and cashmeres. These sturdier fabrications are not normally explored on an Armani runway, but they looked beautiful when cut into modern shapes such as in the swing jackets and trapeze coats, where deep black faded gracefully into increasingly lighter shades of grey, before melting into a soothing shade of lemon chiffon. Armani also tamed wilder shades of yellow with sheer cages of black chiffon, which calmed the hue's loudness to a quiet roar. He finished with a lovely line up of crystal-embroidered gowns, each one a testament to this designer's prowess when it comes to putting Hollywood actresses in Oscar gowns.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Gucci

The first clue to Frida Giannini's new pared-down aesthetic this season came in the form of her usual Milan show space, which had been coated in an unusually brilliant white. The clean walls and runway underfoot made for a rousing canvas from which her sharply drawn, reductivist collection popped. Giannini's silhouettes were borrowed liberally from the 1960s and centered around Mod-like skinny pants (including a jean) and mini skirt dresses with sharp A-line cuts. The latter were beautifully rendered in dusty shades of sage, mustard and rose with sleeveless leather panelled tops and matching crepe skirts. The new cropped lengths allowed Giannini to play with low, block-heeled knee boots brandished with Gucci's famous horsebit hardware, a metal game that was later played across dress fronts. The boots, like the rest of the breezy sportswear inflected collection, were made not just for walking but also conveniently for sitting, standing, running, dancing and all the other activity sensible women do every day. It's refreshing to see Giannini go back to her levelheaded, feminine roots - to the simplicity, in fact, of her very first collections for Gucci. A clean, no-nonsense womanly aesthetic suits this designer. It allows for the occasional frippery, like Mongolian fur, shaggy goat hair and shaved mink, all in shades of powder pink, to be swallowed as easily and pleasantly as a gumdrop.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin


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