Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon Prize winner Rita Parniczky on ‘the beauty of making’

Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon Prize announces Rita Parniczky as its 2016 winner. The Hungarian-born textile artist's works impressed the jury for their combination of nature-inspired forms and precise craftsmanship

Left, textile artist Rita Parniczky, winner of the 2016 Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon Prize. Right, an example of the artist's woven textile work
Hungarian weaver Rita Parniczky is the recipient of the 2016 Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon Prize, awarded each year to a contemporary craftsperson whose work embodies the values of Art Nouveau
(Image credit: press)

The Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon Prize exhibition is back for its fourth chapter, celebrating contemporary creators who through their work establish a bond between art and nature. In the spirit of Art Nouveau principles, the chosen winner for 2016 is Hungarian-born textile artist (opens in new tab) Rita Parniczky, whose work was chosen by a panel including inaugural winner Hitomi Hosono, art critic Peter Aspden, designer Tord Boontje and milliner Stephen Jones, among others, headed by this year’s chair, the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Jo Hooper.

Rita Parniczky: Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon Prize winner 2016

The textile artist’s works attracted the Salon’s consensus for their novel approach to art and nature, with a combination of abstract forms and precise craftsmanship that provide new abstract interpretations of the Salon’s concept. ‘Growing up in the Hungarian countryside, the flat landscapes of my region gave me unlimited views of the horizon, un-bounding my perspectives of scale,’ says Parniczky. ‘Light and shade through skeleton-like winter trees, the glare of virgin snow, and the contrast between these elements are ever present in my visual language.’

A closeup of Perrier Jouet Art Salon Prize winner Rita Parniczky's textile work

(Image credit: press)

Parniczky’s work consists of hand-woven textiles, which she creates using transparent nylon monofilament mixed with iridescent threads and natural threads such as cotton and rayon. The artist’s textile shapes are inspired by the gothic architecture of Norwich Cathedral as well as anatomy and the human body. ’I see the bone structure of the body like an architectural structure,’ says Parniczky, ‘and I brought them into my world by developing this weave technique further.’

The human body is a strong reference in her work, with vertical shapes inspired by the skeleton, blood vessels and the nervous system. These elements are abstracted and recreated in extraordinary textile panels, and converse with light thanks to the transparency behind her technique. ‘I find this aspect of my work very interesting; the fact that it’s changing all the time as light is changing. Natural circumstances and the environment have quite an impact on the pieces, there is a kind of performance with the work and natural light.’

Meditative and quietly innovative, her work is an inspiring combination of nature, traditional craft and a contemporary approach to art. ‘This award is about the beauty in everyday life,’ explains Axelle De Buffevent, style director at Perrier-Jouët. ‘Rita does it in an amazing way. It’s also about awarding the beauty of making, and the beauty of making in a very contemporary way – we are not nostalgic, not looking back, we have a very strong heritage we want to keep alive in a contemporary way.’

Rita Parniczky's textile work is on show at Contemporary Applied Arts in July 2016

Parniczky’s work is on show at Contemporary Applied Arts in July 2016, in a display curated by Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon member Julia Royse

(Image credit: press)

An abstract textile piece by Rita Parniczky, inspired by her childhood in Hungary

‘Growing up in the Hungarian countryside, the flat landscapes of my region gave me unlimited views of the horizon, un-bounding my perspectives of scale,’ says Parniczky. ‘Light and shade through skeleton-like winter trees, the glare of virgin snow, and the contrast between these elements are ever present in my visual language’

(Image credit: press)

The exhibition of Rita Parniczky's work at Contemporary Applied Arts, 2016

The exhibition includes a series of textiles as well as photographic prints that the artist produced while studying textile design at Central Saint Martins 

(Image credit: press)

Hanging tapestries by 2016 Perrier-Jouët Arts Salon prize winner Rita Parniczky

Parniczky’s work consists of hand-woven tapestries, which she creates on a manual loom using transparent nylon yarns mixed with iridescent filament and natural threads such as cotton and rayon

(Image credit: press)

Two installation views from an exhibition of Rita Parniczky's work at Contemporary Applied Arts, 2016

The artist’s textile shapes are inspired by the gothic architecture of Norwich Cathedral as well as anatomy and the human body: ‘I see the bone structure of the body like an architectural structure,’ says Parniczky

(Image credit: press)

Textile panels by Rita Parniczky

Organic inspirations are abstracted and recreated in her extraordinary textile panels, conversing with light thanks to the transparency behind her technique. ‘I find this aspect in my work very interesting; the fact that it’s changing all the time as light is changing,’ she says

(Image credit: press)

INFORMATION

ritaparniczky.com (opens in new tab)

ADDRESS

Contemporary Applied Arts
89 Southwark Street
London, SE1 0HX

VIEW GOOGLE MAPS (opens in new tab)

Rosa Bertoli was born in Udine, Italy, and now lives in London. Since 2014, she has been the Design Editor of Wallpaper*, where she oversees design content for the print and online editions, as well as special editorial projects. Through her role at Wallpaper*, she has written extensively about all areas of design. Rosa has been speaker and moderator for various design talks and conferences including London Craft Week, Maison & Objet, The Italian Cultural Institute (London), Clippings, Zaha Hadid Design, Kartell and Frieze Art Fair. Rosa has been on judging panels for the Chart Architecture Award, the Dutch Design Awards and the DesignGuild Marks. She has written for numerous English and Italian language publications, and worked as a content and communication consultant for fashion and design brands.