Eclectic spaces: Danish design studio Frama starts interior architecture division

The photo to the left shows a glass table with a vase with flowers on it and a rectangular wooden board on the wall. The photo to the right shows a dar marble tiled wall with a black curtain.
Frama Interior Architecture is the new initiative by the titular, multifaceted design studio. The practice has recently transformed the interiors of two Copenhagen stores. Pictured left: the Packyard concept store. Right: Stig P’s flagship store
(Image credit: TBC)

The ideas pouring out of the grand 1800s building that design studio Frama (opens in new tab) inhabits are fully eclectic. The Copenhagen-based collective has a working space that is ever changing and experimental, and it is with this aesthetic they have started a new venture – Frama Interior Architecture, transforming the interiors of two stores in their city.

Located in Nyboder, their impressive St Pauls Apotek studio space retains its original apothecary architecture of embellished glass ceilings, medical drawers and weathered, oil treated floorboards. Frama have used an assortment of raw materials with their own products to conceive different spaces that are constantly ‘work in progress’ within their studio. From an industrial kitchen that mixes anthracite, steel and wood against the original walls; to the ‘St Pauls Blue Room’ where the walls are washed with a bespoke blue pigment made in collaboration with manufacturer Jotun, their inspirational interiors allow for a substantial degree of alteration and flexibility.

Frama have taken this uniquely free level of creativity to their redesigns of two Copenhagen boutiques: a women’s clothes store called Stig P and a concept store called Packyard, both possessing distinctly individual styles. As with their studio, they have made use of the original 1980s marble tiles that adorn the walls in the Stig P showroom. Building on this, they decided to expose the walls that were previously hidden, using a dark palette alongside natural woods, minimalist metal railing and Kvadrat fabrics to compliment the veined marble-work.

The Packyard store transformation presents an opposite world – light, fresh hues in a spacious and simple set, appearing more like a gallery. Here, they bought an experimental flair to the space, with moveable floating walls. Flat pieces of elmwood (a play on the name of the street the shop lives on – 'Elmegade') hang from the ceiling, and can be used as mirrors, glass, display walls or dividers, to customise the store's layout.

‘Our interior architecture section is challenging the company and making sure we are constantly out of our comfort zone with new ideas,’ says Niels Strøyer Christophersen, Frama's founder. Next up for the team is the remodel of a classic bistro, set to open in November.

A room painted in blue, including the wall and the wood floors. A classic armchair is set in the corner, with a painting hung to the left. To the right are two wall lights with a mirror, and a table with decoration on it.

The transformation of these two spaces reflects the highly eclectic design style of Frama’s St Pauls Apotek studio. Pictured: The Frama studio’s ’St Pauls Blue Room’, painted using a bespoke pigment

(Image credit: TBC)

The photo to the left shows a white wood table with lanterns and different decorations on it, with cooper light fixtures coming low from the ceiling. The photo to the right shows a detail of a turned on light bulb on the table.

Incorporating myriad raw materials into their designs, Frama’s studio space is a constant ’work in progress’

(Image credit: TBC)

Dark gray marble tiled wall with a black curtain to the right. In front of it is a clothes rack with shirts hung.

For the Stig P redesign, the brand made use of the original 1980s marble titles that adorn the walls, exposing them while utilising a dark palette to match the veins in the tiles

(Image credit: TBC)

The photo to the left shows a room with a dark gray marble tiled wall with a clothes rack with shirts hung. The photo to the right shows pink suede stilettos.

Minimalist railing and Kvadrat fabrics complement the marble

(Image credit: TBC)

The Packyard store is all white, with a glass separator diving the room. To the left, we see light wood shelves with shoes on them. To the right, we see a black vase with flowers in it.

In contrast to Stig P, the Packyard store was given fresh and light hues, subsequently resembling a gallery as much as a retail space

(Image credit: TBC)

The photo to the left shows a close-up of the light wood shelves with shoes on them. The photo to the right shows a clothes rack hanging from the ceiling with shirts hung, and a stool to the left.

Here, they bought an experimental flair to the space, with moveable floating walls

(Image credit: TBC)

The photo to the left shows a clothes rack hanging from the ceiling with shirts hung, and a small part of the wooden shelves. The photo to the right shows a close-up of the sliding separator in yellow.

(Image credit: TBC)

The photo to the left shows a privacy screen in olive green and a see-through mesh part. The photo to the right shows a classic armchair in blue tones.

Next up for the team is a remodel of a classic bistro, set to open in November. Pictured: Frama’s St Pauls Apotek studio

(Image credit: TBC)

INFORMATION

For more information, visit Frama CPH (opens in new tab)

ADDRESS

Packyard
Elmegade 22
2200, Copenhagen

Stig P
Kronprinsensgade 14
1114, Copenhagen

VIEW GOOGLE MAPS (opens in new tab)