Geometrical poetry: Rana Begum's infinite artwork on show in London

Rana Begum's gallery space, white walls displaying pieces of artwork, white ceiling with spotlights, grey gloss marble floor
London-based contemporary artist Rana Begum has opened her solo show ‘The Space Between’ at the Parasol Unit foundation for contemporary art
(Image credit: Jack Hems)

Lights, symmetry and shaping; these are some of the themes in the newest solo show at Parasol Unit foundation for contemporary art. The artworks – that can only be described as poetic geometry – are by Rana Begum, a Bangladeshi-born, London-based contemporary artist.

Graduating from Chelsea College of Art and Design in 2002, and the Slade thereafter, Begum has since been travelling across the world dispersing her graceful works. These comprise an intriguing mix of the Islamic art that she was immersed in from a young age, with a Western influence.

Showing previously at the Royal Academy’s summer exhibition in 2012, this marks her first London solo show, wherein she presents a selection of her pieces that come together in a magnitude of materials and patterns.

Titled ‘The Space Between’, the show's rhythm runs in synergy right from the titles of the pieces – each is kept clean and simple with just a number. Hidden silhouettes, optical illusions and angles continue across the works; like the painted lines in No. 480 and No. 531 that both explore triangles through overlapping subtle gradients.

Elsewhere the sculptural pieces create a more abstract geometrical flow. Begum folds materials to create minimal and architectural contours, in stainless steel in No. 591 and birch ply in No. 563 (both protrude from the wall). Yet there is a another overarching dimension that is unspoken: 'Light is a vitally activating element in Begum’s works,’ the gallery explains, ‘its shifts and changes producing an experience that is both temporal and sensorial.’

These optic twists and turns continue throughout, even across the mixed use of steel, concrete and mesh. Created specifically for the show, No. 670 is a labyrinth of mesh that forms messy routes and directions, inviting the audience to delve inside Begum’s geometrical mind – pleasingly symmetrical, but often vividly perplexing.

Gallery space, white walls, white ceiling with spotlights, grey marble gloss floor, Begum art piece, wood and orange triangular shape fixed together leant against left wall, long black poles in a row leant against the far wall

On view until 18 September, Begum's graceful works comprise an intriguing mix of the Islamic art that she was immersed in from a young age, with a Western influence

(Image credit: Jack Hems)

Darkly lit room, neon angle shapes projected onto the walls, neon tube lights lit around the edge of the floor shining up

Hidden silhouettes, optical illusions and angles are visible across the work as motifs

(Image credit: ack Hems)

Gallery space, white walls, grey marble floor, pieces of Begum angle shaped artwork on display

Begum folds materials to create minimal and architectural contours in stainless steel in No. 591 (pictured left) and birch ply in No. 563 (pictured right)

(Image credit: Jack Hems)

Rana Begum's gallery space, white walls displaying pieces of artwork, white ceiling with spotlights, grey gloss marble floor

The show's rhythm runs in synergy right from the titles of the works – each is kept clean and simple with just a number

(Image credit: Jack Hems)

Rana Begum's gallery space, white walls displaying pieces of artwork, white ceiling with spotlights, white column, grey gloss marble floor

No. 531 (pictured left) explores triangles through overlapping subtle gradients

(Image credit: Jack Hems)

Rana Begum's gallery space, white walls, grey gloss marble floor, angular black frame and yellow piece artwork on the floor, metal artwork piece on the far wall

These optic twists and turns continue throughout, even across the mixed use of steel, concrete and mesh

(Image credit: Jack Hems)

Rana Begum's gallery space, white walls, coloured mesh floor standing artwork, white ceiling with spotlights, window on the left wall with view of tree tops outside, grey gloss marble floor

Created specifically for the show, No. 670 is a labyrinth of mesh that forms messy lines and shapes. The piece invites the audience to delve inside Begum's geometrical mind

(Image credit: Jack Hems)

INFORMATION

'Rana Begum: The Space Between' is on view until 18 September. For more information, visit the Parasol Unit website (opens in new tab)

Photography: Jack Hems. Courtesy Parasol Unit

ADDRESS

Parasol Unit
14 Wharf Road
London, N1 7RW

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