This weekend retreat in Sagaponack nods to a minimalist farmhouse

A weekend retreat in Sagaponack is the perfect Hamptons house, bridging old and new, traditional and contemporary, courtesy of architecture studio Birdseye

hero exterior view of timber clad Hamptons house
(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Contemporary and modernist architecture, farmland, history and nature meet in The Hamptons, and Lathhouse, a new holiday residence in Sagaponack, is a design that draws on this rich, multi-layered context. The project, created by Vermont-based architecture and construction studio Birdseye, bridges clean, minimalist forms with agricultural references and a natural take – from its sustainable architecture and building systems to its cladding in the warm, tactile materiality of wood. The recently completed home is both subtle and ‘of its place', offering a template for a modern weekend retreat.

‘Lathhouse reflects a purposeful agrarian context, much like a barn in its pastoral setting,' the architects explain. ‘The residence, a two-story gable structure, is oriented east-west overlooking a spacious lawn to the south. The gently sloping topography, coupled with the minimalist pool house, defines the lower lawn, pool, and tennis court areas. The pool house mediates between the pool and tennis court activities. The site perimeter is defined by a continuous privet hedge and anchored by mature deciduous trees.’

night time aerial of timber Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

As its name suggests, the home’s design was inspired by the eponymous lath house, ‘a traditional gabled farm structure made primarily of wood laths or slats spaced to reduce sunlight while permitting ventilation’, the architects continue. Timber is used in many of the region’s agricultural typologies and it forms a strong part of the identity of this project too. Timber slats cover the walls and roof, but also act as shelter and shading for large openings that help illuminate the interior. At the same time, the texture and colouring of the weathered wood cladding nods to the timeless patina of existing structures in this part of the world. 

Inside, a large living space for sitting, relaxing, dining and entertaining is complemented by three generous bedrooms and a wealth of auxiliary spaces – such as a dedicated mudroom and a laundry – across two main levels. An additional floor below ground contains a guest suite, a gym, wine storage, and TV and family room, while the pool house, with its geometric, minimalist pergola, offers another lounge option for residents. Interiors were the work of Brooke Michelsen Design.

This weekend retreat feels contextual and sits softly in its environment. Birdseye’s considered design ensures it’s a home that makes the most of both modern technologies and traditional knowledge, offering a Sagaponack escape like no other.

facade with terrace at Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

timber volume of Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Minimalist profile of Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

view of Hamptons house within green expanses

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Swimming pool in front of Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Pergola and swimming pool in the garden of timber clad Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Dusk shot from the outside looking in wooden Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Double height living space of Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Kitchen inside Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

Bedroom with a view of nature in Hamptons house

(Image credit: Michael Moran)

INFORMATION

birdseyevt.com (opens in new tab)

brookemichelsen.com (opens in new tab)

Ellie Stathaki is the Architecture Editor at Wallpaper*. She trained as an architect at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece and studied architectural history at the Bartlett in London. Now an established journalist, she has been a member of the Wallpaper* team since 2006, visiting buildings across the globe and interviewing leading architects such as Tadao Ando and Rem Koolhaas. Ellie has also taken part in judging panels, moderated events, curated shows and contributed in books, such as The Contemporary House (Thames & Hudson, 2018) and Glenn Sestig Architecture Diary (2020).

With contributions from