Bishop Edward King Chapel by Niall McLaughlin Architects wins the 2013 Wood Awards

The Bishop Edward King Chapel by Niall McLaughlin Architects, situated in Oxford. A round building under some large trees.
The Bishop Edward King Chapel by Niall McLaughlin Architects, situated in Oxford, has scooped the top prize at this year's Wood Awards
(Image credit: TBC)

The Bishop Edward King Chapel by Niall McLaughlin Architects has been named the Gold Award winner at the 2013 Wood Awards, announced tonight in a ceremony held at the Worshipful Company of Carpenters in London. In addition to this, the project - also shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize earlier this year - was selected for the Structural category prize of the awards.

The shortlist included several projects of different scales and typologies over seven key categories: Bespoke Furniture, Commercial & Public Access, Private, Production-made Furniture, Repair & Adaptive Reuse, Small Project and Structural.

An amphitheater with a piano in the middle of a wooden floor with seating stands on either side.

(Image credit: TBC)

See the projects that made the 2013 Wood Awards shortlist

The other categories winners included the Colyer-Fergusson Building in Kent by Tim Ronalds Architects (Commercial & Public Access Award), Church Walk in London by David Mikhail Architects (Private Award), Magheralin Parish Church in Northern Ireland by Waddington-McClure Architects (Repair & Adaptive Reuse Award), and the RoominaRoom in London by Atmos Studio (Small Project Award). Winners of the furniture categories included Pengelly Design's 'Theo Chair' (Production Made Furniture Award).

The Wood Awards - sponsored by the American Hardwood Export Council, Canada Wood, Carpenters' Company, TRADA, Wood for Good, American Softwoods, BRE and the Forestry Commission - is the industry's annual celebration of the best creations out of timber, spanning design and architecture.

A chapel features European oak, both inside and outside, while ash was used for its fitted furniture and internal doors.

The chapel features European oak, both inside and outside, while ash was used for its fitted furniture and internal doors

(Image credit: TBC)

View of the main chapel looking towards the alter. A round area with benches and long round hanging pendant lights.

View of the main chapel looking towards the alter

(Image credit: TBC)

An oak bell tower engineered by Glulam is perched on the chapel's exterior

An oak bell tower engineered by Glulam is perched on the chapel's exterior

(Image credit: TBC)

Ellie Stathaki is the Architecture Editor at Wallpaper*. She trained as an architect at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece and studied architectural history at the Bartlett in London. Now an established journalist, she has been a member of the Wallpaper* team since 2006, visiting buildings across the globe and interviewing leading architects such as Tadao Ando and Rem Koolhaas. Ellie has also taken part in judging panels, moderated events, curated shows and contributed in books, such as The Contemporary House (Thames & Hudson, 2018) and Glenn Sestig Architecture Diary (2020).