Escape to the country with this contemporary Polish farmhouse

BXB studio head Bogusław Barnaś and his team transform a Polish farmhouse into a 21st century rural home

A multi-building Polish farmhouse surrounded by greenery
(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

A Polish farmhouse set in the rural idyll of the country's green, rolling hills, has been redesigned by BXB studio head Bogusław Barnaś and his team into a contemporary homestead. The generous project, which spans over 500 sq m, consisted of five distinct existing agricultural structures that were slated for demolition, being neglected and in a bad state of repair. The architect stepped in to transform the complex into a modern home made up of a series of interconnected barns that fan out across the verdant site. 

Led by the orientation of the vistas, as well as the sun's path during the day, the architecture team defined how the structures sit and open up towards the landscape. Clad in timber, the five buildings blend comfortably in their natural environment, while at the same time, their clean, contemporary forms clearly cut a distinct, modern figure in the leafy context. ‘Each and every project is a real challenge, [representing] a deep desire to create something unique and breathtaking, it is a great social responsibility to shape the world we all live in,' says Barnaś. 

Barn conversion reimagines Polish farmhouse

Aerial of contemporary Polish farmhouse and barn conversion

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

The five buildings contain, respectively, a garage (which also acts as a buffer between the residential parts of the complex and the road); the kitchen and family spaces; the children's bedrooms; a studio space; and the master suite and a living space with a wooden deck looking over the surrounding wilderness. Each barn’s wood species and textures have been researched and selected to specifically fit their use – being softer or more hardwearing, lighter or darker, according to the function. 

Aiming to be respectful to its natural environs, the Polish farmhouse's redesign incorporates gestures such as the preservation of trees found on the site, and a volume arrangement and footbridge that negotiates the existing terrain to ensure the house has a minimal impact on the land. Meanwhile, design elements abstractly nod to traditional agricultural structures in the region. ‘We, at BXB studio, think that this kind of openness with regard to heritage and tradition allows us to discover a richness, full of great creativity, and that this kind of creation of space gives our buildings durability and timelessness. We believe that in this way, our buildings are not merely anonymous or without a soul, and that they are something more significant than just a modern building,’ the architects say.

Timber Polish farmhouse surrounded by greenery.

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

Night time shot of Polish farmhouse illuminated with outdoor lights and interior lamps seen through a window.

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

Polish farmhouse conversion illuminated at night.

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

Exterior view of slatted house in converted Polish farmhouse illuminated at night.

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

Interior looking out of Polish farmhouse to a decking area with tables and chairs.

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

Pitched roof from inside a Polish farmhouse at an upper level.

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

Outside looking in at converted Polish farmhouse's decking area.

(Image credit: Piotr Krajewski)

INFORMATION
bxbstudio.com

Ellie Stathaki is the Architecture Editor at Wallpaper*. She trained as an architect at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece and studied architectural history at the Bartlett in London. Now an established journalist, she has been a member of the Wallpaper* team since 2006, visiting buildings across the globe and interviewing leading architects such as Tadao Ando and Rem Koolhaas. Ellie has also taken part in judging panels, moderated events, curated shows and contributed in books, such as The Contemporary House (Thames & Hudson, 2018) and Glenn Sestig Architecture Diary (2020).

With contributions from