Dries Van Noten

Belgian designer Dries Van Noten has kicked off Paris’ fiercely competitive sartorial circuit with a standout Spring offering that will certainly be hard to top. Set against a backdrop of zigzagging screens painted in gold, the collection unfolded to a moody solo specially scored and performed by Radiohead’s bass guitarist Colin Greenwood. Sleeveless tuxedo jackets, gold plisse skirts and numbers in gilded micro-beaded fold lace all made a worthy outing. Van Noten’s prints made a similar splash, with ensembles crafted in night-sky motifs and blood-red poppy florals. Accessories, too, were en pointe: sunglasses came oversized and rounded, à la John Lennon, and models donned chunky platform cork-soled shoes. Silks of all gauges, finishes and twills were used throughout, from organza to chiffon to plongée, while copious amounts of ruffles completed the picture. Most memorable was a heavy silk damask with a tulip motif reproduced from the archives of Paris’ Arts Decoratifs, where the designer is set to exhibit the results of his collaboration with the museum next February.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Dries Van Noten

Belgian designer Dries Van Noten has kicked off Paris’ fiercely competitive sartorial circuit with a standout Spring offering that will certainly be hard to top. Set against a backdrop of zigzagging screens painted in gold, the collection unfolded to a moody solo specially scored and performed by Radiohead’s bass guitarist Colin Greenwood. Sleeveless tuxedo jackets, gold plisse skirts and numbers in gilded micro-beaded fold lace all made a worthy outing. Van Noten’s prints made a similar splash, with ensembles crafted in night-sky motifs and blood-red poppy florals. Accessories, too, were en pointe: sunglasses came oversized and rounded, à la John Lennon, and models donned chunky platform cork-soled shoes. Silks of all gauges, finishes and twills were used throughout, from organza to chiffon to plongée, while copious amounts of ruffles completed the picture. Most memorable was a heavy silk damask with a tulip motif reproduced from the archives of Paris’ Arts Decoratifs, where the designer is set to exhibit the results of his collaboration with the museum next February.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Dries Van Noten

Belgian designer Dries Van Noten has kicked off Paris’ fiercely competitive sartorial circuit with a standout Spring offering that will certainly be hard to top. Set against a backdrop of zigzagging screens painted in gold, the collection unfolded to a moody solo specially scored and performed by Radiohead’s bass guitarist Colin Greenwood. Sleeveless tuxedo jackets, gold plisse skirts and numbers in gilded micro-beaded fold lace all made a worthy outing. Van Noten’s prints made a similar splash, with ensembles crafted in night-sky motifs and blood-red poppy florals. Accessories, too, were en pointe: sunglasses came oversized and rounded, à la John Lennon, and models donned chunky platform cork-soled shoes. Silks of all gauges, finishes and twills were used throughout, from organza to chiffon to plongée, while copious amounts of ruffles completed the picture. Most memorable was a heavy silk damask with a tulip motif reproduced from the archives of Paris’ Arts Decoratifs, where the designer is set to exhibit the results of his collaboration with the museum next February.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Dries Van Noten

Belgian designer Dries Van Noten has kicked off Paris’ fiercely competitive sartorial circuit with a standout Spring offering that will certainly be hard to top. Set against a backdrop of zigzagging screens painted in gold, the collection unfolded to a moody solo specially scored and performed by Radiohead’s bass guitarist Colin Greenwood. Sleeveless tuxedo jackets, gold plisse skirts and numbers in gilded micro-beaded fold lace all made a worthy outing. Van Noten’s prints made a similar splash, with ensembles crafted in night-sky motifs and blood-red poppy florals. Accessories, too, were en pointe: sunglasses came oversized and rounded, à la John Lennon, and models donned chunky platform cork-soled shoes. Silks of all gauges, finishes and twills were used throughout, from organza to chiffon to plongée, while copious amounts of ruffles completed the picture. Most memorable was a heavy silk damask with a tulip motif reproduced from the archives of Paris’ Arts Decoratifs, where the designer is set to exhibit the results of his collaboration with the museum next February.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Dries Van Noten

Belgian designer Dries Van Noten has kicked off Paris’ fiercely competitive sartorial circuit with a standout Spring offering that will certainly be hard to top. Set against a backdrop of zigzagging screens painted in gold, the collection unfolded to a moody solo specially scored and performed by Radiohead’s bass guitarist Colin Greenwood. Sleeveless tuxedo jackets, gold plisse skirts and numbers in gilded micro-beaded fold lace all made a worthy outing. Van Noten’s prints made a similar splash, with ensembles crafted in night-sky motifs and blood-red poppy florals. Accessories, too, were en pointe: sunglasses came oversized and rounded, à la John Lennon, and models donned chunky platform cork-soled shoes. Silks of all gauges, finishes and twills were used throughout, from organza to chiffon to plongée, while copious amounts of ruffles completed the picture. Most memorable was a heavy silk damask with a tulip motif reproduced from the archives of Paris’ Arts Decoratifs, where the designer is set to exhibit the results of his collaboration with the museum next February.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Rochas

Creative director Marco Zanini used American playwright Tennessee Williams’s ‘The Glass Menagerie’ as a springboard for his latest offering, unveiling one of the most ultra-femme collections to glide down a runway this season. Zanini’s model-debutantes sported fittingly girlish ensembles. Cream-coloured maxi skirts came in pleated silk chiffon and florals encased every inch of long-line jackets. Flouncing tutus and ruffled sheath dresses were plentiful. Zanini turned to the experienced hands at textile houses in France and Italy for his evocative journey in fabric and ornamentation: duchesse silk was bonded with organza; a bright, sheer new tech fabric called Nigel was combined with velvet; and buttons were cut from clear glass. Footwear was fittingly prim and proper, with buckled crocodile skimmers and sandals adorned in crystals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Rochas

Creative director Marco Zanini used American playwright Tennessee Williams’s ‘The Glass Menagerie’ as a springboard for his latest - and final - offering for Rochas, unveiling one of the most ultra-femme collections to glide down a runway this season. Zanini’s model-debutantes sported fittingly girlish ensembles. Cream-coloured maxi skirts came in pleated silk chiffon and florals encased every inch of long-line jackets. Flouncing tutus and ruffled sheath dresses were plentiful. Zanini turned to the experienced hands at textile houses in France and Italy for his evocative journey in fabric and ornamentation: duchesse silk was bonded with organza; a bright, sheer new tech fabric called Nigel was combined with velvet; and buttons were cut from clear glass. Footwear was fittingly prim and proper, with buckled crocodile skimmers and sandals adorned in crystals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Rochas

Creative director Marco Zanini used American playwright Tennessee Williams’s ‘The Glass Menagerie’ as a springboard for his latest - and final - offering for Rochas, unveiling one of the most ultra-femme collections to glide down a runway this season. Zanini’s model-debutantes sported fittingly girlish ensembles. Cream-coloured maxi skirts came in pleated silk chiffon and florals encased every inch of long-line jackets. Flouncing tutus and ruffled sheath dresses were plentiful. Zanini turned to the experienced hands at textile houses in France and Italy for his evocative journey in fabric and ornamentation: duchesse silk was bonded with organza; a bright, sheer new tech fabric called Nigel was combined with velvet; and buttons were cut from clear glass. Footwear was fittingly prim and proper, with buckled crocodile skimmers and sandals adorned in crystals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Rochas

Creative director Marco Zanini used American playwright Tennessee Williams’s ‘The Glass Menagerie’ as a springboard for his latest - and final - offering for Rochas, unveiling one of the most ultra-femme collections to glide down a runway this season. Zanini’s model-debutantes sported fittingly girlish ensembles. Cream-coloured maxi skirts came in pleated silk chiffon and florals encased every inch of long-line jackets. Flouncing tutus and ruffled sheath dresses were plentiful. Zanini turned to the experienced hands at textile houses in France and Italy for his evocative journey in fabric and ornamentation: duchesse silk was bonded with organza; a bright, sheer new tech fabric called Nigel was combined with velvet; and buttons were cut from clear glass. Footwear was fittingly prim and proper, with buckled crocodile skimmers and sandals adorned in crystals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Rochas

Creative director Marco Zanini used American playwright Tennessee Williams’s ‘The Glass Menagerie’ as a springboard for his latest - and final - offering for Rochas, unveiling one of the most ultra-femme collections to glide down a runway this season. Zanini’s model-debutantes sported fittingly girlish ensembles. Cream-coloured maxi skirts came in pleated silk chiffon and florals encased every inch of long-line jackets. Flouncing tutus and ruffled sheath dresses were plentiful. Zanini turned to the experienced hands at textile houses in France and Italy for his evocative journey in fabric and ornamentation: duchesse silk was bonded with organza; a bright, sheer new tech fabric called Nigel was combined with velvet; and buttons were cut from clear glass. Footwear was fittingly prim and proper, with buckled crocodile skimmers and sandals adorned in crystals.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss

Carven

The Carven name is currently on the lips and hips of some of Paris' coolest girls (remember the crushed-wool oversized pink coat from last season? It’s officially everywhere.) It also happens to command the most covetable piece of real estate in Paris this season - the gilded windows of super-boutique Colette. One would think, then, that the label would have a haute sensibility; in reality it sits at the crown of the contemporary-fashion tier. The price, therefore, is right and the design is just as easy to devour. Creative director Guillaume Henry always keeps his shapes simple and this season was no different, with exquisitely cut miniskirts, cropped jackets with widened shoulders and dresses with long, sloping skirts. The straightforward forms got juiced up with the season's new prints - one made from tumbling oversized roses, another in brightly coloured gingham checks and the last a graphic camouflage rendered in girlish pastels. None of these are groundbreaking graphics - in fact, we’ve seen plenty of them elsewhere the past few seasons. But Henry made a cool play on pattern, splintering it up into fragments of appliqué across the shoulders of coats or dresses. Also of note: a sexy, sharply flared dress cut from camouflage-printed fine lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Carven

The Carven name is currently on the lips and hips of some of Paris' coolest girls (remember the crushed-wool oversized pink coat from last season? It’s officially everywhere.) It also happens to command the most covetable piece of real estate in Paris this season - the gilded windows of super-boutique Colette. One would think, then, that the label would have a haute sensibility; in reality it sits at the crown of the contemporary-fashion tier. The price, therefore, is right and the design is just as easy to devour. Creative director Guillaume Henry always keeps his shapes simple and this season was no different, with exquisitely cut miniskirts, cropped jackets with widened shoulders and dresses with long, sloping skirts. The straightforward forms got juiced up with the season's new prints - one made from tumbling oversized roses, another in brightly coloured gingham checks and the last a graphic camouflage rendered in girlish pastels. None of these are groundbreaking graphics - in fact, we’ve seen plenty of them elsewhere the past few seasons. But Henry made a cool play on pattern, splintering it up into fragments of appliqué across the shoulders of coats or dresses. Also of note: a sexy, sharply flared dress cut from camouflage-printed fine lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Carven

The Carven name is currently on the lips and hips of some of Paris' coolest girls (remember the crushed-wool oversized pink coat from last season? It’s officially everywhere.) It also happens to command the most covetable piece of real estate in Paris this season - the gilded windows of super-boutique Colette. One would think, then, that the label would have a haute sensibility; in reality it sits at the crown of the contemporary-fashion tier. The price, therefore, is right and the design is just as easy to devour. Creative director Guillaume Henry always keeps his shapes simple and this season was no different, with exquisitely cut miniskirts, cropped jackets with widened shoulders and dresses with long, sloping skirts. The straightforward forms got juiced up with the season's new prints - one made from tumbling oversized roses, another in brightly coloured gingham checks and the last a graphic camouflage rendered in girlish pastels. None of these are groundbreaking graphics - in fact, we’ve seen plenty of them elsewhere the past few seasons. But Henry made a cool play on pattern, splintering it up into fragments of appliqué across the shoulders of coats or dresses. Also of note: a sexy, sharply flared dress cut from camouflage-printed fine lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Carven

The Carven name is currently on the lips and hips of some of Paris' coolest girls (remember the crushed-wool oversized pink coat from last season? It’s officially everywhere.) It also happens to command the most covetable piece of real estate in Paris this season - the gilded windows of super-boutique Colette. One would think, then, that the label would have a haute sensibility; in reality it sits at the crown of the contemporary-fashion tier. The price, therefore, is right and the design is just as easy to devour. Creative director Guillaume Henry always keeps his shapes simple and this season was no different, with exquisitely cut miniskirts, cropped jackets with widened shoulders and dresses with long, sloping skirts. The straightforward forms got juiced up with the season's new prints - one made from tumbling oversized roses, another in brightly coloured gingham checks and the last a graphic camouflage rendered in girlish pastels. None of these are groundbreaking graphics - in fact, we’ve seen plenty of them elsewhere the past few seasons. But Henry made a cool play on pattern, splintering it up into fragments of appliqué across the shoulders of coats or dresses. Also of note: a sexy, sharply flared dress cut from camouflage-printed fine lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Carven

The Carven name is currently on the lips and hips of some of Paris' coolest girls (remember the crushed-wool oversized pink coat from last season? It’s officially everywhere.) It also happens to command the most covetable piece of real estate in Paris this season - the gilded windows of super-boutique Colette. One would think, then, that the label would have a haute sensibility; in reality it sits at the crown of the contemporary-fashion tier. The price, therefore, is right and the design is just as easy to devour. Creative director Guillaume Henry always keeps his shapes simple and this season was no different, with exquisitely cut miniskirts, cropped jackets with widened shoulders and dresses with long, sloping skirts. The straightforward forms got juiced up with the season's new prints - one made from tumbling oversized roses, another in brightly coloured gingham checks and the last a graphic camouflage rendered in girlish pastels. None of these are groundbreaking graphics - in fact, we’ve seen plenty of them elsewhere the past few seasons. But Henry made a cool play on pattern, splintering it up into fragments of appliqué across the shoulders of coats or dresses. Also of note: a sexy, sharply flared dress cut from camouflage-printed fine lace.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Balmain

Olivier Rousteing is still kicking the venerable house of Balmain into the sexpot stratosphere. By now, his audience is accustomed to the itsy-bitsy pieces worn by models with tawny, glistening skin and golden tresses. But, to his credit, that hasn’t bored them. The song and dance may unfold to roughly the same tune each season (hems hiked to naughty lengths, waists cinched as if by tourniquet, more sparkle than Elizabeth Taylor’s heaving bosom) but it always looks fresh and properly designed. The latter is easier said than done. This season Rousteing took on the sport-friendly silhouette of the sweatshirt and jacked it up to the oligarch-friendly price of couture. His loosened knits were strung with giant crystals, knitted with silver and gold metal and furrowed with decorative rosettes. The palette this season was softer, in lovely pastels that Rousteing spun into giant houndstooth patterns on oversized two-piece skirt suits. Elsewhere, waists were cinched with heavyweight-champ belts and skirts flounced with sculpted ruffles that harkened back to the brand’s rarefied world.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Balmain

Olivier Rousteing is still kicking the venerable house of Balmain into the sexpot stratosphere. By now, his audience is accustomed to the itsy-bitsy pieces worn by models with tawny, glistening skin and golden tresses. But, to his credit, that hasn’t bored them. The song and dance may unfold to roughly the same tune each season (hems hiked to naughty lengths, waists cinched as if by tourniquet, more sparkle than Elizabeth Taylor’s heaving bosom) but it always looks fresh and properly designed. The latter is easier said than done. This season Rousteing took on the sport-friendly silhouette of the sweatshirt and jacked it up to the oligarch-friendly price of couture. His loosened knits were strung with giant crystals, knitted with silver and gold metal and furrowed with decorative rosettes. The palette this season was softer, in lovely pastels that Rousteing spun into giant houndstooth patterns on oversized two-piece skirt suits. Elsewhere, waists were cinched with heavyweight-champ belts and skirts flounced with sculpted ruffles that harkened back to the brand’s rarefied world.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Balmain

Olivier Rousteing is still kicking the venerable house of Balmain into the sexpot stratosphere. By now, his audience is accustomed to the itsy-bitsy pieces worn by models with tawny, glistening skin and golden tresses. But, to his credit, that hasn’t bored them. The song and dance may unfold to roughly the same tune each season (hems hiked to naughty lengths, waists cinched as if by tourniquet, more sparkle than Elizabeth Taylor’s heaving bosom) but it always looks fresh and properly designed. The latter is easier said than done. This season Rousteing took on the sport-friendly silhouette of the sweatshirt and jacked it up to the oligarch-friendly price of couture. His loosened knits were strung with giant crystals, knitted with silver and gold metal and furrowed with decorative rosettes. The palette this season was softer, in lovely pastels that Rousteing spun into giant houndstooth patterns on oversized two-piece skirt suits. Elsewhere, waists were cinched with heavyweight-champ belts and skirts flounced with sculpted ruffles that harkened back to the brand’s rarefied world.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Balmain

Olivier Rousteing is still kicking the venerable house of Balmain into the sexpot stratosphere. By now, his audience is accustomed to the itsy-bitsy pieces worn by models with tawny, glistening skin and golden tresses. But, to his credit, that hasn’t bored them. The song and dance may unfold to roughly the same tune each season (hems hiked to naughty lengths, waists cinched as if by tourniquet, more sparkle than Elizabeth Taylor’s heaving bosom) but it always looks fresh and properly designed. The latter is easier said than done. This season Rousteing took on the sport-friendly silhouette of the sweatshirt and jacked it up to the oligarch-friendly price of couture. His loosened knits were strung with giant crystals, knitted with silver and gold metal and furrowed with decorative rosettes. The palette this season was softer, in lovely pastels that Rousteing spun into giant houndstooth patterns on oversized two-piece skirt suits. Elsewhere, waists were cinched with heavyweight-champ belts and skirts flounced with sculpted ruffles that harkened back to the brand’s rarefied world.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Balmain

Olivier Rousteing is still kicking the venerable house of Balmain into the sexpot stratosphere. By now, his audience is accustomed to the itsy-bitsy pieces worn by models with tawny, glistening skin and golden tresses. But, to his credit, that hasn’t bored them. The song and dance may unfold to roughly the same tune each season (hems hiked to naughty lengths, waists cinched as if by tourniquet, more sparkle than Elizabeth Taylor’s heaving bosom) but it always looks fresh and properly designed. The latter is easier said than done. This season Rousteing took on the sport-friendly silhouette of the sweatshirt and jacked it up to the oligarch-friendly price of couture. His loosened knits were strung with giant crystals, knitted with silver and gold metal and furrowed with decorative rosettes. The palette this season was softer, in lovely pastels that Rousteing spun into giant houndstooth patterns on oversized two-piece skirt suits. Elsewhere, waists were cinched with heavyweight-champ belts and skirts flounced with sculpted ruffles that harkened back to the brand’s rarefied world.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rick Owens

The controversy over whether or not fashion designers embrace enough diversity in their model castings was blown to bits at Rick Owens, where the American designer featured a throng of real woman - ethnically diverse with shapely curves. Not only did the women - members of various step dance crews - not adhere to Paris' typical model look, they didn’t act like them either. They came onto the stage stomping their feet, beating their chests, snarling their lips and growling like wild, wonderful beasts, before launching into a 15-minute choreographed tribal dance that electrified the jaded fashion audience. Everyone’s eyes may have been glued to these girls' moves, but it was hard not to notice that the clothes looked great, too. Draped tops, leather vests, tunics and knit shorts were all done the Owens way: sportswear wrapped to regal heights. Even with the African beats, the women sported swaths of solid hues: khaki, black and white, rather than riots of patterned cloth. Owens never broke down and offered 'real' models as a counterpoint to his guest dancers. These are the women, take it or leave it, he seemed to say. They were glorious, so it goes without saying, we’ll take it.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rick Owens

The controversy over whether or not fashion designers embrace enough diversity in their model castings was blown to bits at Rick Owens, where the American designer featured a throng of real woman - ethnically diverse with shapely curves. Not only did the women - members of various step dance crews - not adhere to Paris' typical model look, they didn’t act like them either. They came onto the stage stomping their feet, beating their chests, snarling their lips and growling like wild, wonderful beasts, before launching into a 15-minute choreographed tribal dance that electrified the jaded fashion audience. Everyone’s eyes may have been glued to these girls' moves, but it was hard not to notice that the clothes looked great, too. Draped tops, leather vests, tunics and knit shorts were all done the Owens way: sportswear wrapped to regal heights. Even with the African beats, the women sported swaths of solid hues: khaki, black and white, rather than riots of patterned cloth. Owens never broke down and offered 'real' models as a counterpoint to his guest dancers. These are the women, take it or leave it, he seemed to say. They were glorious, so it goes without saying, we’ll take it.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rick Owens

The controversy over whether or not fashion designers embrace enough diversity in their model castings was blown to bits at Rick Owens, where the American designer featured a throng of real woman - ethnically diverse with shapely curves. Not only did the women - members of various step dance crews - not adhere to Paris' typical model look, they didn’t act like them either. They came onto the stage stomping their feet, beating their chests, snarling their lips and growling like wild, wonderful beasts, before launching into a 15-minute choreographed tribal dance that electrified the jaded fashion audience. Everyone’s eyes may have been glued to these girls' moves, but it was hard not to notice that the clothes looked great, too. Draped tops, leather vests, tunics and knit shorts were all done the Owens way: sportswear wrapped to regal heights. Even with the African beats, the women sported swaths of solid hues: khaki, black and white, rather than riots of patterned cloth. Owens never broke down and offered 'real' models as a counterpoint to his guest dancers. These are the women, take it or leave it, he seemed to say. They were glorious, so it goes without saying, we’ll take it.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rick Owens

The controversy over whether or not fashion designers embrace enough diversity in their model castings was blown to bits at Rick Owens, where the American designer featured a throng of real woman - ethnically diverse with shapely curves. Not only did the women - members of various step dance crews - not adhere to Paris' typical model look, they didn’t act like them either. They came onto the stage stomping their feet, beating their chests, snarling their lips and growling like wild, wonderful beasts, before launching into a 15-minute choreographed tribal dance that electrified the jaded fashion audience. Everyone’s eyes may have been glued to these girls' moves, but it was hard not to notice that the clothes looked great, too. Draped tops, leather vests, tunics and knit shorts were all done the Owens way: sportswear wrapped to regal heights. Even with the African beats, the women sported swaths of solid hues: khaki, black and white, rather than riots of patterned cloth. Owens never broke down and offered 'real' models as a counterpoint to his guest dancers. These are the women, take it or leave it, he seemed to say. They were glorious, so it goes without saying, we’ll take it.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Rick Owens

The controversy over whether or not fashion designers embrace enough diversity in their model castings was blown to bits at Rick Owens, where the American designer featured a throng of real woman - ethnically diverse with shapely curves. Not only did the women - members of various step dance crews - not adhere to Paris' typical model look, they didn’t act like them either. They came onto the stage stomping their feet, beating their chests, snarling their lips and growling like wild, wonderful beasts, before launching into a 15-minute choreographed tribal dance that electrified the jaded fashion audience. Everyone’s eyes may have been glued to these girls' moves, but it was hard not to notice that the clothes looked great, too. Draped tops, leather vests, tunics and knit shorts were all done the Owens way: sportswear wrapped to regal heights. Even with the African beats, the women sported swaths of solid hues: khaki, black and white, rather than riots of patterned cloth. Owens never broke down and offered 'real' models as a counterpoint to his guest dancers. These are the women, take it or leave it, he seemed to say. They were glorious, so it goes without saying, we’ll take it.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Lanvin

‘We all need some shine in our lives,’ said the preternaturally optimistic and infinitely quotable Alber Elbaz. He was speaking of his Spring collection for Lanvin, which was showered in enough high-wattage glimmer to light up Las Vegas. If that sounded cheesy in theory, it certainly wasn't in execution. This is a designer who, over the past decade, has single-handedly carved a niche for feminine dressing wrapped up in rigorous-chic packaging. And this collection - despite its bright lights, big city feel - was in the exact same vein of sophistication. Working in every fabric under the sun, from thick bouclé and tweed to filmy lamé, silk and effervescent tulle, Elbaz spurred a discourse on upbeat options with a glittering finish. Nearly every jewel tone under the rainbow was corralled into the range, as was every silhouette a girl could ask for. The possibilities were endless, and the fil rouge holding it all together was the edgy polish. Even the most high-maintenance woman would be hard pressed not to find something that flattered her shape, matched her style and, most importantly, tugged at her heart.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Lanvin

‘We all need some shine in our lives,’ said the preternaturally optimistic and infinitely quotable Alber Elbaz. He was speaking of his Spring collection for Lanvin, which was showered in enough high-wattage glimmer to light up Las Vegas. If that sounded cheesy in theory, it certainly wasn't in execution. This is a designer who, over the past decade, has single-handedly carved a niche for feminine dressing wrapped up in rigorous-chic packaging. And this collection - despite its bright lights, big city feel - was in the exact same vein of sophistication. Working in every fabric under the sun, from thick bouclé and tweed to filmy lamé, silk and effervescent tulle, Elbaz spurred a discourse on upbeat options with a glittering finish. Nearly every jewel tone under the rainbow was corralled into the range, as was every silhouette a girl could ask for. The possibilities were endless, and the fil rouge holding it all together was the edgy polish. Even the most high-maintenance woman would be hard pressed not to find something that flattered her shape, matched her style and, most importantly, tugged at her heart.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Lanvin

‘We all need some shine in our lives,’ said the preternaturally optimistic and infinitely quotable Alber Elbaz. He was speaking of his Spring collection for Lanvin, which was showered in enough high-wattage glimmer to light up Las Vegas. If that sounded cheesy in theory, it certainly wasn't in execution. This is a designer who, over the past decade, has single-handedly carved a niche for feminine dressing wrapped up in rigorous-chic packaging. And this collection - despite its bright lights, big city feel - was in the exact same vein of sophistication. Working in every fabric under the sun, from thick bouclé and tweed to filmy lamé, silk and effervescent tulle, Elbaz spurred a discourse on upbeat options with a glittering finish. Nearly every jewel tone under the rainbow was corralled into the range, as was every silhouette a girl could ask for. The possibilities were endless, and the fil rouge holding it all together was the edgy polish. Even the most high-maintenance woman would be hard pressed not to find something that flattered her shape, matched her style and, most importantly, tugged at her heart.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Lanvin

‘We all need some shine in our lives,’ said the preternaturally optimistic and infinitely quotable Alber Elbaz. He was speaking of his Spring collection for Lanvin, which was showered in enough high-wattage glimmer to light up Las Vegas. If that sounded cheesy in theory, it certainly wasn't in execution. This is a designer who, over the past decade, has single-handedly carved a niche for feminine dressing wrapped up in rigorous-chic packaging. And this collection - despite its bright lights, big city feel - was in the exact same vein of sophistication. Working in every fabric under the sun, from thick bouclé and tweed to filmy lamé, silk and effervescent tulle, Elbaz spurred a discourse on upbeat options with a glittering finish. Nearly every jewel tone under the rainbow was corralled into the range, as was every silhouette a girl could ask for. The possibilities were endless, and the fil rouge holding it all together was the edgy polish. Even the most high-maintenance woman would be hard pressed not to find something that flattered her shape, matched her style and, most importantly, tugged at her heart.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Lanvin

‘We all need some shine in our lives,’ said the preternaturally optimistic and infinitely quotable Alber Elbaz. He was speaking of his Spring collection for Lanvin, which was showered in enough high-wattage glimmer to light up Las Vegas. If that sounded cheesy in theory, it certainly wasn't in execution. This is a designer who, over the past decade, has single-handedly carved a niche for feminine dressing wrapped up in rigorous-chic packaging. And this collection - despite its bright lights, big city feel - was in the exact same vein of sophistication. Working in every fabric under the sun, from thick bouclé and tweed to filmy lamé, silk and effervescent tulle, Elbaz spurred a discourse on upbeat options with a glittering finish. Nearly every jewel tone under the rainbow was corralled into the range, as was every silhouette a girl could ask for. The possibilities were endless, and the fil rouge holding it all together was the edgy polish. Even the most high-maintenance woman would be hard pressed not to find something that flattered her shape, matched her style and, most importantly, tugged at her heart.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret found a treasure trove of inspiration in the art-filled gardens at Paris' Palais Royal this season. ‘Daniel Buren used abstract pieces that initially caused a mass uproar,’ explained Mouret in his show notes, ‘27 years later it remains one of the most beautiful contradictions in Paris.’ A similar sort of tension - between wild exuberance and tamed classicism - informed Mouret's Spring offering. Formal staples in the female wardrobe – like elegant shift dresses, narrow pencil skirts and neat car coats – were all redrawn, with their lines pulled askew. The cuts were architectural and even with their abstracted seams the ensembles still held an air of sex appeal in their body hugging shapes and sheer inserts. What impressed most in this collection was the bold take on colour blocking and the shocking hues of sleek eel skin that Mouret offered as his new seasonal stripe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret found a treasure trove of inspiration in the art-filled gardens at Paris' Palais Royal this season. ‘Daniel Buren used abstract pieces that initially caused a mass uproar,’ explained Mouret in his show notes, ‘27 years later it remains one of the most beautiful contradictions in Paris.’ A similar sort of tension - between wild exuberance and tamed classicism - informed Mouret's Spring offering. Formal staples in the female wardrobe – like elegant shift dresses, narrow pencil skirts and neat car coats – were all redrawn, with their lines pulled askew. The cuts were architectural and even with their abstracted seams the ensembles still held an air of sex appeal in their body hugging shapes and sheer inserts. What impressed most in this collection was the bold take on colour blocking and the shocking hues of sleek eel skin that Mouret offered as his new seasonal stripe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret found a treasure trove of inspiration in the art-filled gardens at Paris' Palais Royal this season. ‘Daniel Buren used abstract pieces that initially caused a mass uproar,’ explained Mouret in his show notes, ‘27 years later it remains one of the most beautiful contradictions in Paris.’ A similar sort of tension - between wild exuberance and tamed classicism - informed Mouret's Spring offering. Formal staples in the female wardrobe – like elegant shift dresses, narrow pencil skirts and neat car coats – were all redrawn, with their lines pulled askew. The cuts were architectural and even with their abstracted seams the ensembles still held an air of sex appeal in their body hugging shapes and sheer inserts. What impressed most in this collection was the bold take on colour blocking and the shocking hues of sleek eel skin that Mouret offered as his new seasonal stripe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret found a treasure trove of inspiration in the art-filled gardens at Paris' Palais Royal this season. ‘Daniel Buren used abstract pieces that initially caused a mass uproar,’ explained Mouret in his show notes, ‘27 years later it remains one of the most beautiful contradictions in Paris.’ A similar sort of tension - between wild exuberance and tamed classicism - informed Mouret's Spring offering. Formal staples in the female wardrobe – like elegant shift dresses, narrow pencil skirts and neat car coats – were all redrawn, with their lines pulled askew. The cuts were architectural and even with their abstracted seams the ensembles still held an air of sex appeal in their body hugging shapes and sheer inserts. What impressed most in this collection was the bold take on colour blocking and the shocking hues of sleek eel skin that Mouret offered as his new seasonal stripe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Roland Mouret

Roland Mouret found a treasure trove of inspiration in the art-filled gardens at Paris' Palais Royal this season. ‘Daniel Buren used abstract pieces that initially caused a mass uproar,’ explained Mouret in his show notes, ‘27 years later it remains one of the most beautiful contradictions in Paris.’ A similar sort of tension - between wild exuberance and tamed classicism - informed Mouret's Spring offering. Formal staples in the female wardrobe – like elegant shift dresses, narrow pencil skirts and neat car coats – were all redrawn, with their lines pulled askew. The cuts were architectural and even with their abstracted seams the ensembles still held an air of sex appeal in their body hugging shapes and sheer inserts. What impressed most in this collection was the bold take on colour blocking and the shocking hues of sleek eel skin that Mouret offered as his new seasonal stripe.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Christian Dior

Raf Simons dubbed his Spring collection ‘Against Nature’ - a brief title that opened up to a whole lot of ideas. A rare intellectual in the frivolous world of fashion, Simons dug deeply, as usual, into his inspiration material, but this season he split it into three branches: ‘Traveller’, ‘Transformer’ and ‘Transporter’. The first section, featuring fascinating hybrids of black suiting and soft, printed plisse dresses, was the strongest. The architectural cuttings – criss-cross fronts, fresh use of negative space and new cross-pollinated shapes - demonstrated Simons’ knack for realising complex concepts with his technical prowess. Also exceptional were the gorgeous knit skirts and dresses featuring asymmetrical fans of fine pleating, or the men's shirtdresses with organic silhouettes and provocative peepholes across shoulders and backs.  If the collection erred in any way, it was only in its ambitious pastiche of ideas on the runway. By the time the parade had finished, Simons had touched on ticker tape bondage, party streamer-esque flap constructions on lantern dresses, cropped jackets with military details, ice blue trapeze-shaped couture coats and a finale of metallic ball gowns. Each one of these ensembles possessed enough depth  to warrant a fashion show of its own. Simons is clearly a man with no shortage of passion. And can that ever be a bad thing?

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Christian Dior

Raf Simons dubbed his Spring collection ‘Against Nature’ - a brief title that opened up to a whole lot of ideas. A rare intellectual in the frivolous world of fashion, Simons dug deeply, as usual, into his inspiration material, but this season he split it into three branches: ‘Traveller’, ‘Transformer’ and ‘Transporter’. The first section, featuring fascinating hybrids of black suiting and soft, printed plisse dresses, was the strongest. The architectural cuttings – criss-cross fronts, fresh use of negative space and new cross-pollinated shapes - demonstrated Simons’ knack for realising complex concepts with his technical prowess. Also exceptional were the gorgeous knit skirts and dresses featuring asymmetrical fans of fine pleating, or the men's shirtdresses with organic silhouettes and provocative peepholes across shoulders and backs.  If the collection erred in any way, it was only in its ambitious pastiche of ideas on the runway. By the time the parade had finished, Simons had touched on ticker tape bondage, party streamer-esque flap constructions on lantern dresses, cropped jackets with military details, ice blue trapeze-shaped couture coats and a finale of metallic ball gowns. Each one of these ensembles possessed enough depth  to warrant a fashion show of its own. Simons is clearly a man with no shortage of passion. And can that ever be a bad thing?

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Christian Dior

Raf Simons dubbed his Spring collection ‘Against Nature’ - a brief title that opened up to a whole lot of ideas. A rare intellectual in the frivolous world of fashion, Simons dug deeply, as usual, into his inspiration material, but this season he split it into three branches: ‘Traveller’, ‘Transformer’ and ‘Transporter’. The first section, featuring fascinating hybrids of black suiting and soft, printed plisse dresses, was the strongest. The architectural cuttings – criss-cross fronts, fresh use of negative space and new cross-pollinated shapes - demonstrated Simons’ knack for realising complex concepts with his technical prowess. Also exceptional were the gorgeous knit skirts and dresses featuring asymmetrical fans of fine pleating, or the men's shirtdresses with organic silhouettes and provocative peepholes across shoulders and backs.  If the collection erred in any way, it was only in its ambitious pastiche of ideas on the runway. By the time the parade had finished, Simons had touched on ticker tape bondage, party streamer-esque flap constructions on lantern dresses, cropped jackets with military details, ice blue trapeze-shaped couture coats and a finale of metallic ball gowns. Each one of these ensembles possessed enough depth  to warrant a fashion show of its own. Simons is clearly a man with no shortage of passion. And can that ever be a bad thing?

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Christian Dior

Raf Simons dubbed his Spring collection ‘Against Nature’ - a brief title that opened up to a whole lot of ideas. A rare intellectual in the frivolous world of fashion, Simons dug deeply, as usual, into his inspiration material, but this season he split it into three branches: ‘Traveller’, ‘Transformer’ and ‘Transporter’. The first section, featuring fascinating hybrids of black suiting and soft, printed plisse dresses, was the strongest. The architectural cuttings – criss-cross fronts, fresh use of negative space and new cross-pollinated shapes - demonstrated Simons’ knack for realising complex concepts with his technical prowess. Also exceptional were the gorgeous knit skirts and dresses featuring asymmetrical fans of fine pleating, or the men's shirtdresses with organic silhouettes and provocative peepholes across shoulders and backs.  If the collection erred in any way, it was only in its ambitious pastiche of ideas on the runway. By the time the parade had finished, Simons had touched on ticker tape bondage, party streamer-esque flap constructions on lantern dresses, cropped jackets with military details, ice blue trapeze-shaped couture coats and a finale of metallic ball gowns. Each one of these ensembles possessed enough depth  to warrant a fashion show of its own. Simons is clearly a man with no shortage of passion. And can that ever be a bad thing?

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Christian Dior

Raf Simons dubbed his Spring collection ‘Against Nature’ - a brief title that opened up to a whole lot of ideas. A rare intellectual in the frivolous world of fashion, Simons dug deeply, as usual, into his inspiration material, but this season he split it into three branches: ‘Traveller’, ‘Transformer’ and ‘Transporter’. The first section, featuring fascinating hybrids of black suiting and soft, printed plisse dresses, was the strongest. The architectural cuttings – criss-cross fronts, fresh use of negative space and new cross-pollinated shapes - demonstrated Simons’ knack for realising complex concepts with his technical prowess. Also exceptional were the gorgeous knit skirts and dresses featuring asymmetrical fans of fine pleating, or the men's shirtdresses with organic silhouettes and provocative peepholes across shoulders and backs.  If the collection erred in any way, it was only in its ambitious pastiche of ideas on the runway. By the time the parade had finished, Simons had touched on ticker tape bondage, party streamer-esque flap constructions on lantern dresses, cropped jackets with military details, ice blue trapeze-shaped couture coats and a finale of metallic ball gowns. Each one of these ensembles possessed enough depth  to warrant a fashion show of its own. Simons is clearly a man with no shortage of passion. And can that ever be a bad thing?

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Imagine the gaudiest, glitziest sequin-crusted gown from the 1980s chopped up into bits and then re-assembled, with pieces of a men's suit thrown in for good measure. That is just about what happened on the Margiela runway where all manner of flashy eveningwear was fused with sober menswear. A pair of velvet crystal sleeves, for example, were borrowed from an ice skating costume and re-constituted with a satin shirt and mannish grey pinstripe trousers. Crystal corsets were cinched around plain shirts, while a chiffon train attached at the shoulder draped along the side of a suit. Sartorial high jinx is normal fare in the wacky world of Maison Martin Margiela and the house made a convincing case for deconstructed clothes this time out, blending the formal with the informal, the exuberant with the poised, and the professional with the party animal - all to terrific effect.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Imagine the gaudiest, glitziest sequin-crusted gown from the 1980s chopped up into bits and then re-assembled, with pieces of a men's suit thrown in for good measure. That is just about what happened on the Margiela runway where all manner of flashy eveningwear was fused with sober menswear. A pair of velvet crystal sleeves, for example, were borrowed from an ice skating costume and re-constituted with a satin shirt and mannish grey pinstripe trousers. Crystal corsets were cinched around plain shirts, while a chiffon train attached at the shoulder draped along the side of a suit. Sartorial high jinx is normal fare in the wacky world of Maison Martin Margiela and the house made a convincing case for deconstructed clothes this time out, blending the formal with the informal, the exuberant with the poised, and the professional with the party animal - all to terrific effect.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Imagine the gaudiest, glitziest sequin-crusted gown from the 1980s chopped up into bits and then re-assembled, with pieces of a men's suit thrown in for good measure. That is just about what happened on the Margiela runway where all manner of flashy eveningwear was fused with sober menswear. A pair of velvet crystal sleeves, for example, were borrowed from an ice skating costume and re-constituted with a satin shirt and mannish grey pinstripe trousers. Crystal corsets were cinched around plain shirts, while a chiffon train attached at the shoulder draped along the side of a suit. Sartorial high jinx is normal fare in the wacky world of Maison Martin Margiela and the house made a convincing case for deconstructed clothes this time out, blending the formal with the informal, the exuberant with the poised, and the professional with the party animal - all to terrific effect.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Imagine the gaudiest, glitziest sequin-crusted gown from the 1980s chopped up into bits and then re-assembled, with pieces of a men's suit thrown in for good measure. That is just about what happened on the Margiela runway where all manner of flashy eveningwear was fused with sober menswear. A pair of velvet crystal sleeves, for example, were borrowed from an ice skating costume and re-constituted with a satin shirt and mannish grey pinstripe trousers. Crystal corsets were cinched around plain shirts, while a chiffon train attached at the shoulder draped along the side of a suit. Sartorial high jinx is normal fare in the wacky world of Maison Martin Margiela and the house made a convincing case for deconstructed clothes this time out, blending the formal with the informal, the exuberant with the poised, and the professional with the party animal - all to terrific effect.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

Imagine the gaudiest, glitziest sequin-crusted gown from the 1980s chopped up into bits and then re-assembled, with pieces of a men's suit thrown in for good measure. That is just about what happened on the Margiela runway where all manner of flashy eveningwear was fused with sober menswear. A pair of velvet crystal sleeves, for example, were borrowed from an ice skating costume and re-constituted with a satin shirt and mannish grey pinstripe trousers. Crystal corsets were cinched around plain shirts, while a chiffon train attached at the shoulder draped along the side of a suit. Sartorial high jinx is normal fare in the wacky world of Maison Martin Margiela and the house made a convincing case for deconstructed clothes this time out, blending the formal with the informal, the exuberant with the poised, and the professional with the party animal - all to terrific effect.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Junya Watanabe

The power of fashion unleashed itself with full force on the runway of Junya Watanabe's remarkable Spring show, where the designer took an idea as simple as fringing and did what only the best artists can do: he transformed it, elevated it and made it completely his own. Working in a silky cotton jersey, Watanabe cut thick strips of fabric from the edges of skin-clinging skirts, and made oversized tops appear as if ropes of necklaces were strung across the chest. The chunky fringe took a more sculptural turn than its finely shorn cousins, and was complemented by the hair, which fell over the clothes in fantastic piles of wiry braids (a light play on Watanabe’s ‘string theory’). The designer worked exclusively with solid hues: first in coal black, followed by tawny beiges and ultimately white, where he breathed new life into shirting. The clothes were impressive, not only for their eye-popping innovation but also for their surprisingly wearable appeal and intriguing shapes. Leather jackets and flared skirts with fringed trim were all deeply covetable. It might be trickier to pull off the feathered headdress that appeared during the finale, but it was the perfect feather in the cap of this extraordinary collection.  

Writer: JJ Martin

Junya Watanabe

The power of fashion unleashed itself with full force on the runway of Junya Watanabe's remarkable Spring show, where the designer took an idea as simple as fringing and did what only the best artists can do: he transformed it, elevated it and made it completely his own. Working in a silky cotton jersey, Watanabe cut thick strips of fabric from the edges of skin-clinging skirts, and made oversized tops appear as if ropes of necklaces were strung across the chest. The chunky fringe took a more sculptural turn than its finely shorn cousins, and was complemented by the hair, which fell over the clothes in fantastic piles of wiry braids (a light play on Watanabe’s ‘string theory’). The designer worked exclusively with solid hues: first in coal black, followed by tawny beiges and ultimately white, where he breathed new life into shirting. The clothes were impressive, not only for their eye-popping innovation but also for their surprisingly wearable appeal and intriguing shapes. Leather jackets and flared skirts with fringed trim were all deeply covetable. It might be trickier to pull off the feathered headdress that appeared during the finale, but it was the perfect feather in the cap of this extraordinary collection.  

Writer: JJ Martin

Junya Watanabe

The power of fashion unleashed itself with full force on the runway of Junya Watanabe's remarkable Spring show, where the designer took an idea as simple as fringing and did what only the best artists can do: he transformed it, elevated it and made it completely his own. Working in a silky cotton jersey, Watanabe cut thick strips of fabric from the edges of skin-clinging skirts, and made oversized tops appear as if ropes of necklaces were strung across the chest. The chunky fringe took a more sculptural turn than its finely shorn cousins, and was complemented by the hair, which fell over the clothes in fantastic piles of wiry braids (a light play on Watanabe’s ‘string theory’). The designer worked exclusively with solid hues: first in coal black, followed by tawny beiges and ultimately white, where he breathed new life into shirting. The clothes were impressive, not only for their eye-popping innovation but also for their surprisingly wearable appeal and intriguing shapes. Leather jackets and flared skirts with fringed trim were all deeply covetable. It might be trickier to pull off the feathered headdress that appeared during the finale, but it was the perfect feather in the cap of this extraordinary collection.  

Writer: JJ Martin

Junya Watanabe

The power of fashion unleashed itself with full force on the runway of Junya Watanabe's remarkable Spring show, where the designer took an idea as simple as fringing and did what only the best artists can do: he transformed it, elevated it and made it completely his own. Working in a silky cotton jersey, Watanabe cut thick strips of fabric from the edges of skin-clinging skirts, and made oversized tops appear as if ropes of necklaces were strung across the chest. The chunky fringe took a more sculptural turn than its finely shorn cousins, and was complemented by the hair, which fell over the clothes in fantastic piles of wiry braids (a light play on Watanabe’s ‘string theory’). The designer worked exclusively with solid hues: first in coal black, followed by tawny beiges and ultimately white, where he breathed new life into shirting. The clothes were impressive, not only for their eye-popping innovation but also for their surprisingly wearable appeal and intriguing shapes. Leather jackets and flared skirts with fringed trim were all deeply covetable. It might be trickier to pull off the feathered headdress that appeared during the finale, but it was the perfect feather in the cap of this extraordinary collection.  

Writer: JJ Martin

Junya Watanabe

The power of fashion unleashed itself with full force on the runway of Junya Watanabe's remarkable Spring show, where the designer took an idea as simple as fringing and did what only the best artists can do: he transformed it, elevated it and made it completely his own. Working in a silky cotton jersey, Watanabe cut thick strips of fabric from the edges of skin-clinging skirts, and made oversized tops appear as if ropes of necklaces were strung across the chest. The chunky fringe took a more sculptural turn than its finely shorn cousins, and was complemented by the hair, which fell over the clothes in fantastic piles of wiry braids (a light play on Watanabe’s ‘string theory’). The designer worked exclusively with solid hues: first in coal black, followed by tawny beiges and ultimately white, where he breathed new life into shirting. The clothes were impressive, not only for their eye-popping innovation but also for their surprisingly wearable appeal and intriguing shapes. Leather jackets and flared skirts with fringed trim were all deeply covetable. It might be trickier to pull off the feathered headdress that appeared during the finale, but it was the perfect feather in the cap of this extraordinary collection.  

Writer: JJ Martin

Acne Studios

Acne has its roots in jeans, so it's no surprise that creative director Jonny Johansson has an affinity for off-duty clothes. This doesn't always mean, however, that all of them are street ready. The opening segment of his Spring collection, drawn in shades of cream, was rife with deconstructed ensembles, extraneous strapping and dissected lines not typically associated with casual basics. Some techniques immediately convinced while others wavered uncertainly, like the sagging slashed leathers. What worked best was Acne's cool take on the sportswear staples you need each and every season. A crinkled yellow shirt jacket, for example, shone beautifully atop a pair of cobalt and navy blocked trousers, while shorts had a great cut and newfound sculptural volume. Also noteworthy were the oversized seat belts, the chunky white rubber soled footwear and the embroidered shorts at the finale embellished in small metallic anchors.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Acne Studios

Acne has its roots in jeans, so it's no surprise that creative director Jonny Johansson has an affinity for off-duty clothes. This doesn't always mean, however, that all of them are street ready. The opening segment of his Spring collection, drawn in shades of cream, was rife with deconstructed ensembles, extraneous strapping and dissected lines not typically associated with casual basics. Some techniques immediately convinced while others wavered uncertainly, like the sagging slashed leathers. What worked best was Acne's cool take on the sportswear staples you need each and every season. A crinkled yellow shirt jacket, for example, shone beautifully atop a pair of cobalt and navy blocked trousers, while shorts had a great cut and newfound sculptural volume. Also noteworthy were the oversized seat belts, the chunky white rubber soled footwear and the embroidered shorts at the finale embellished in small metallic anchors.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Acne Studios

Acne has its roots in jeans, so it's no surprise that creative director Jonny Johansson has an affinity for off-duty clothes. This doesn't always mean, however, that all of them are street ready. The opening segment of his Spring collection, drawn in shades of cream, was rife with deconstructed ensembles, extraneous strapping and dissected lines not typically associated with casual basics. Some techniques immediately convinced while others wavered uncertainly, like the sagging slashed leathers. What worked best was Acne's cool take on the sportswear staples you need each and every season. A crinkled yellow shirt jacket, for example, shone beautifully atop a pair of cobalt and navy blocked trousers, while shorts had a great cut and newfound sculptural volume. Also noteworthy were the oversized seat belts, the chunky white rubber soled footwear and the embroidered shorts at the finale embellished in small metallic anchors.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Acne Studios

Acne has its roots in jeans, so it's no surprise that creative director Jonny Johansson has an affinity for off-duty clothes. This doesn't always mean, however, that all of them are street ready. The opening segment of his Spring collection, drawn in shades of cream, was rife with deconstructed ensembles, extraneous strapping and dissected lines not typically associated with casual basics. Some techniques immediately convinced while others wavered uncertainly, like the sagging slashed leathers. What worked best was Acne's cool take on the sportswear staples you need each and every season. A crinkled yellow shirt jacket, for example, shone beautifully atop a pair of cobalt and navy blocked trousers, while shorts had a great cut and newfound sculptural volume. Also noteworthy were the oversized seat belts, the chunky white rubber soled footwear and the embroidered shorts at the finale embellished in small metallic anchors.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Acne Studios

Acne has its roots in jeans, so it's no surprise that creative director Jonny Johansson has an affinity for off-duty clothes. This doesn't always mean, however, that all of them are street ready. The opening segment of his Spring collection, drawn in shades of cream, was rife with deconstructed ensembles, extraneous strapping and dissected lines not typically associated with casual basics. Some techniques immediately convinced while others wavered uncertainly, like the sagging slashed leathers. What worked best was Acne's cool take on the sportswear staples you need each and every season. A crinkled yellow shirt jacket, for example, shone beautifully atop a pair of cobalt and navy blocked trousers, while shorts had a great cut and newfound sculptural volume. Also noteworthy were the oversized seat belts, the chunky white rubber soled footwear and the embroidered shorts at the finale embellished in small metallic anchors.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Comme des Garçons

It's a good thing that the models at Comme des Garçons glided down the runway at a glacial pace - otherwise the audience would never have been able to ingest even a fraction of the workmanship that went into the remarkable clothes. Every collection designed by Rei Kawakubo is rousing, but S/S 2014 was a standout. Starting with her first look - an exaggerated Victorian silhouette whose hourglass curves appeared outlined by hand in thick velvet - Kawakubo began a discourse on all manner of rounded forms. Working in two dimensions, she cut large peep-hole circles into thick wools, played with pod-like garments and pink tights and patched together a team of oversized puffers into an airy tunic. The show then took a sharp turn, as it usually does, as Kawakubo injected three-dimensionality into the shapes, like a dress with leather hosing suspended from gold chains, or a black silk car tyre under the waist of a dress. It was at once jarring and fascinating, amplified by the noir palette. Sculpting funeral-black silk taffeta, satin, tulle and a technical mesh into pleated ruffles and crinoline constructions, she created as theatrical a collection as she could have delivered. We especially appreciated the structural white boning at the edges of a bubblegum-pink ruffled dress. It was a show worthy of an encore, but no amount of applause could draw the reclusive designer into the spotlight for a bow.

Writer: JJ Martin

Comme des Garçons

It's a good thing that the models at Comme des Garçons glided down the runway at a glacial pace - otherwise the audience would never have been able to ingest even a fraction of the workmanship that went into the remarkable clothes. Every collection designed by Rei Kawakubo is rousing, but S/S 2014 was a standout. Starting with her first look - an exaggerated Victorian silhouette whose hourglass curves appeared outlined by hand in thick velvet - Kawakubo began a discourse on all manner of rounded forms. Working in two dimensions, she cut large peep-hole circles into thick wools, played with pod-like garments and pink tights and patched together a team of oversized puffers into an airy tunic. The show then took a sharp turn, as it usually does, as Kawakubo injected three-dimensionality into the shapes, like a dress with leather hosing suspended from gold chains, or a black silk car tyre under the waist of a dress. It was at once jarring and fascinating, amplified by the noir palette. Sculpting funeral-black silk taffeta, satin, tulle and a technical mesh into pleated ruffles and crinoline constructions, she created as theatrical a collection as she could have delivered. We especially appreciated the structural white boning at the edges of a bubblegum-pink ruffled dress. It was a show worthy of an encore, but no amount of applause could draw the reclusive designer into the spotlight for a bow.

Writer: JJ Martin

Comme des Garçons

It's a good thing that the models at Comme des Garçons glided down the runway at a glacial pace - otherwise the audience would never have been able to ingest even a fraction of the workmanship that went into the remarkable clothes. Every collection designed by Rei Kawakubo is rousing, but S/S 2014 was a standout. Starting with her first look - an exaggerated Victorian silhouette whose hourglass curves appeared outlined by hand in thick velvet - Kawakubo began a discourse on all manner of rounded forms. Working in two dimensions, she cut large peep-hole circles into thick wools, played with pod-like garments and pink tights and patched together a team of oversized puffers into an airy tunic. The show then took a sharp turn, as it usually does, as Kawakubo injected three-dimensionality into the shapes, like a dress with leather hosing suspended from gold chains, or a black silk car tyre under the waist of a dress. It was at once jarring and fascinating, amplified by the noir palette. Sculpting funeral-black silk taffeta, satin, tulle and a technical mesh into pleated ruffles and crinoline constructions, she created as theatrical a collection as she could have delivered. We especially appreciated the structural white boning at the edges of a bubblegum-pink ruffled dress. It was a show worthy of an encore, but no amount of applause could draw the reclusive designer into the spotlight for a bow.

Writer: JJ Martin

Comme des Garçons

It's a good thing that the models at Comme des Garçons glided down the runway at a glacial pace - otherwise the audience would never have been able to ingest even a fraction of the workmanship that went into the remarkable clothes. Every collection designed by Rei Kawakubo is rousing, but S/S 2014 was a standout. Starting with her first look - an exaggerated Victorian silhouette whose hourglass curves appeared outlined by hand in thick velvet - Kawakubo began a discourse on all manner of rounded forms. Working in two dimensions, she cut large peep-hole circles into thick wools, played with pod-like garments and pink tights and patched together a team of oversized puffers into an airy tunic. The show then took a sharp turn, as it usually does, as Kawakubo injected three-dimensionality into the shapes, like a dress with leather hosing suspended from gold chains, or a black silk car tyre under the waist of a dress. It was at once jarring and fascinating, amplified by the noir palette. Sculpting funeral-black silk taffeta, satin, tulle and a technical mesh into pleated ruffles and crinoline constructions, she created as theatrical a collection as she could have delivered. We especially appreciated the structural white boning at the edges of a bubblegum-pink ruffled dress. It was a show worthy of an encore, but no amount of applause could draw the reclusive designer into the spotlight for a bow.

Writer: JJ Martin

Comme des Garçons

It's a good thing that the models at Comme des Garçons glided down the runway at a glacial pace - otherwise the audience would never have been able to ingest even a fraction of the workmanship that went into the remarkable clothes. Every collection designed by Rei Kawakubo is rousing, but S/S 2014 was a standout. Starting with her first look - an exaggerated Victorian silhouette whose hourglass curves appeared outlined by hand in thick velvet - Kawakubo began a discourse on all manner of rounded forms. Working in two dimensions, she cut large peep-hole circles into thick wools, played with pod-like garments and pink tights and patched together a team of oversized puffers into an airy tunic. The show then took a sharp turn, as it usually does, as Kawakubo injected three-dimensionality into the shapes, like a dress with leather hosing suspended from gold chains, or a black silk car tyre under the waist of a dress. It was at once jarring and fascinating, amplified by the noir palette. Sculpting funeral-black silk taffeta, satin, tulle and a technical mesh into pleated ruffles and crinoline constructions, she created as theatrical a collection as she could have delivered. We especially appreciated the structural white boning at the edges of a bubblegum-pink ruffled dress. It was a show worthy of an encore, but no amount of applause could draw the reclusive designer into the spotlight for a bow.

Writer: JJ Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon are not just a couple of California kids with a very big gig in Paris. The fashion savvy they’ve brought to the historic house of Kenzo hit a cool point this season with a collection full of fresh silhouettes and graphic patterns. The shapes were easy but ticked all the boxes of the nouveau ’90s: bandeau top with cropped white jean; sleeveless blouson leather jacket with straight miniskirt; boxy, cropped cotton top with shorts over wide-leg trousers. The designers brought in visual interest with scratchy-looking surfaces - either printed in primary colours against a white canvas or beaded with sequins. The Pacific also had an outing with hand-drawn prints of jumping fish and lace fish embroideries. But the element that made the biggest splash at the show was the exquisite curtain of water that shielded the models from the audience.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon are not just a couple of California kids with a very big gig in Paris. The fashion savvy they’ve brought to the historic house of Kenzo hit a cool point this season with a collection full of fresh silhouettes and graphic patterns. The shapes were easy but ticked all the boxes of the nouveau ’90s: bandeau top with cropped white jean; sleeveless blouson leather jacket with straight miniskirt; boxy, cropped cotton top with shorts over wide-leg trousers. The designers brought in visual interest with scratchy-looking surfaces - either printed in primary colours against a white canvas or beaded with sequins. The Pacific also had an outing with hand-drawn prints of jumping fish and lace fish embroideries. But the element that made the biggest splash at the show was the exquisite curtain of water that shielded the models from the audience.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon are not just a couple of California kids with a very big gig in Paris. The fashion savvy they’ve brought to the historic house of Kenzo hit a cool point this season with a collection full of fresh silhouettes and graphic patterns. The shapes were easy but ticked all the boxes of the nouveau ’90s: bandeau top with cropped white jean; sleeveless blouson leather jacket with straight miniskirt; boxy, cropped cotton top with shorts over wide-leg trousers. The designers brought in visual interest with scratchy-looking surfaces - either printed in primary colours against a white canvas or beaded with sequins. The Pacific also had an outing with hand-drawn prints of jumping fish and lace fish embroideries. But the element that made the biggest splash at the show was the exquisite curtain of water that shielded the models from the audience.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon are not just a couple of California kids with a very big gig in Paris. The fashion savvy they’ve brought to the historic house of Kenzo hit a cool point this season with a collection full of fresh silhouettes and graphic patterns. The shapes were easy but ticked all the boxes of the nouveau ’90s: bandeau top with cropped white jean; sleeveless blouson leather jacket with straight miniskirt; boxy, cropped cotton top with shorts over wide-leg trousers. The designers brought in visual interest with scratchy-looking surfaces - either printed in primary colours against a white canvas or beaded with sequins. The Pacific also had an outing with hand-drawn prints of jumping fish and lace fish embroideries. But the element that made the biggest splash at the show was the exquisite curtain of water that shielded the models from the audience.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Kenzo

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon are not just a couple of California kids with a very big gig in Paris. The fashion savvy they’ve brought to the historic house of Kenzo hit a cool point this season with a collection full of fresh silhouettes and graphic patterns. The shapes were easy but ticked all the boxes of the nouveau ’90s: bandeau top with cropped white jean; sleeveless blouson leather jacket with straight miniskirt; boxy, cropped cotton top with shorts over wide-leg trousers. The designers brought in visual interest with scratchy-looking surfaces - either printed in primary colours against a white canvas or beaded with sequins. The Pacific also had an outing with hand-drawn prints of jumping fish and lace fish embroideries. But the element that made the biggest splash at the show was the exquisite curtain of water that shielded the models from the audience.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Céline

Long and lean. Sculpted yet flowing. Arty but controlled. If we had to box the Céline collection into blanket terms, those words might possibly do. Pushing both forms and norms, as always, creative director Phoebe Philo's Spring collection made a cannonball-sized splash in Paris. An elongated silhouette was translated into layers of tunic-length tanks, shirts with flared sleeves and pleated knit skirts with nipped waists. Philo was already working with slender skirt silhouettes for Fall, but Spring's collection pushed them even further. There was a new, arty focus on the clothes that came embellished with cool, minimal graphics - from squiggles of black fringe and mesh to metal-trimmed portholes and silver-sphere heels. Philo brushed broad strokes of ochre, cobalt and emerald over newsprint for a contemporary twist on pattern. And the effect of her paintwork was as seismic as a Pollock hanging in a stark white room. The best clothes of the season are wearable works of art, and Philo's are destined to be collector’s pieces.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Céline

Long and lean. Sculpted yet flowing. Arty but controlled. If we had to box the Céline collection into blanket terms, those words might possibly do. Pushing both forms and norms, as always, creative director Phoebe Philo's Spring collection made a cannonball-sized splash in Paris. An elongated silhouette was translated into layers of tunic-length tanks, shirts with flared sleeves and pleated knit skirts with nipped waists. Philo was already working with slender skirt silhouettes for Fall, but Spring's collection pushed them even further. There was a new, arty focus on the clothes that came embellished with cool, minimal graphics - from squiggles of black fringe and mesh to metal-trimmed portholes and silver-sphere heels. Philo brushed broad strokes of ochre, cobalt and emerald over newsprint for a contemporary twist on pattern. And the effect of her paintwork was as seismic as a Pollock hanging in a stark white room. The best clothes of the season are wearable works of art, and Philo's are destined to be collector’s pieces.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Céline

Long and lean. Sculpted yet flowing. Arty but controlled. If we had to box the Céline collection into blanket terms, those words might possibly do. Pushing both forms and norms, as always, creative director Phoebe Philo's Spring collection made a cannonball-sized splash in Paris. An elongated silhouette was translated into layers of tunic-length tanks, shirts with flared sleeves and pleated knit skirts with nipped waists. Philo was already working with slender skirt silhouettes for Fall, but Spring's collection pushed them even further. There was a new, arty focus on the clothes that came embellished with cool, minimal graphics - from squiggles of black fringe and mesh to metal-trimmed portholes and silver-sphere heels. Philo brushed broad strokes of ochre, cobalt and emerald over newsprint for a contemporary twist on pattern. And the effect of her paintwork was as seismic as a Pollock hanging in a stark white room. The best clothes of the season are wearable works of art, and Philo's are destined to be collector’s pieces.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Céline

Long and lean. Sculpted yet flowing. Arty but controlled. If we had to box the Céline collection into blanket terms, those words might possibly do. Pushing both forms and norms, as always, creative director Phoebe Philo's Spring collection made a cannonball-sized splash in Paris. An elongated silhouette was translated into layers of tunic-length tanks, shirts with flared sleeves and pleated knit skirts with nipped waists. Philo was already working with slender skirt silhouettes for Fall, but Spring's collection pushed them even further. There was a new, arty focus on the clothes that came embellished with cool, minimal graphics - from squiggles of black fringe and mesh to metal-trimmed portholes and silver-sphere heels. Philo brushed broad strokes of ochre, cobalt and emerald over newsprint for a contemporary twist on pattern. And the effect of her paintwork was as seismic as a Pollock hanging in a stark white room. The best clothes of the season are wearable works of art, and Philo's are destined to be collector’s pieces.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Céline

Long and lean. Sculpted yet flowing. Arty but controlled. If we had to box the Céline collection into blanket terms, those words might possibly do. Pushing both forms and norms, as always, creative director Phoebe Philo's Spring collection made a cannonball-sized splash in Paris. An elongated silhouette was translated into layers of tunic-length tanks, shirts with flared sleeves and pleated knit skirts with nipped waists. Philo was already working with slender skirt silhouettes for Fall, but Spring's collection pushed them even further. There was a new, arty focus on the clothes that came embellished with cool, minimal graphics - from squiggles of black fringe and mesh to metal-trimmed portholes and silver-sphere heels. Philo brushed broad strokes of ochre, cobalt and emerald over newsprint for a contemporary twist on pattern. And the effect of her paintwork was as seismic as a Pollock hanging in a stark white room. The best clothes of the season are wearable works of art, and Philo's are destined to be collector’s pieces.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chloé

Paris is currently in the midst of Spring collections in Paris and yet, given the many sombre runways here, one could easily confuse them for Fall shows. It was a refreshing jolt, then, when Chloé presented a collection that would look right at home on the shores of an exotic beach. Creative director Clare Waight Keller showed silk chiffon kaftans and deep V-neck plissé dresses with their fluttering ends twisted into knots. Oversized carpenter trousers were cut in sheer linen, while cork wedge mules seemed the perfect footwear for a chic stroll around a coastal town. Even the palette seemed lifted straight from the Mediterannean: muddy khakis were the shade of wet sand and a range of blues evoked deep sapphire waters. Some of the plain layered-chiffon dresses hung a touch too loosely on the body, but Waight Keller more than made up for them in her fabulous finale of metallic Swiss Dot numbers that hit the money spot between holiday cool and urban sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chloé

Paris is currently in the midst of Spring collections in Paris and yet, given the many sombre runways here, one could easily confuse them for Fall shows. It was a refreshing jolt, then, when Chloé presented a collection that would look right at home on the shores of an exotic beach. Creative director Clare Waight Keller showed silk chiffon kaftans and deep V-neck plissé dresses with their fluttering ends twisted into knots. Oversized carpenter trousers were cut in sheer linen, while cork wedge mules seemed the perfect footwear for a chic stroll around a coastal town. Even the palette seemed lifted straight from the Mediterannean: muddy khakis were the shade of wet sand and a range of blues evoked deep sapphire waters. Some of the plain layered-chiffon dresses hung a touch too loosely on the body, but Waight Keller more than made up for them in her fabulous finale of metallic Swiss Dot numbers that hit the money spot between holiday cool and urban sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chloé

Paris is currently in the midst of Spring collections in Paris and yet, given the many sombre runways here, one could easily confuse them for Fall shows. It was a refreshing jolt, then, when Chloé presented a collection that would look right at home on the shores of an exotic beach. Creative director Clare Waight Keller showed silk chiffon kaftans and deep V-neck plissé dresses with their fluttering ends twisted into knots. Oversized carpenter trousers were cut in sheer linen, while cork wedge mules seemed the perfect footwear for a chic stroll around a coastal town. Even the palette seemed lifted straight from the Mediterannean: muddy khakis were the shade of wet sand and a range of blues evoked deep sapphire waters. Some of the plain layered-chiffon dresses hung a touch too loosely on the body, but Waight Keller more than made up for them in her fabulous finale of metallic Swiss Dot numbers that hit the money spot between holiday cool and urban sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chloé

Paris is currently in the midst of Spring collections in Paris and yet, given the many sombre runways here, one could easily confuse them for Fall shows. It was a refreshing jolt, then, when Chloé presented a collection that would look right at home on the shores of an exotic beach. Creative director Clare Waight Keller showed silk chiffon kaftans and deep V-neck plissé dresses with their fluttering ends twisted into knots. Oversized carpenter trousers were cut in sheer linen, while cork wedge mules seemed the perfect footwear for a chic stroll around a coastal town. Even the palette seemed lifted straight from the Mediterannean: muddy khakis were the shade of wet sand and a range of blues evoked deep sapphire waters. Some of the plain layered-chiffon dresses hung a touch too loosely on the body, but Waight Keller more than made up for them in her fabulous finale of metallic Swiss Dot numbers that hit the money spot between holiday cool and urban sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chloé

Paris is currently in the midst of Spring collections in Paris and yet, given the many sombre runways here, one could easily confuse them for Fall shows. It was a refreshing jolt, then, when Chloé presented a collection that would look right at home on the shores of an exotic beach. Creative director Clare Waight Keller showed silk chiffon kaftans and deep V-neck plissé dresses with their fluttering ends twisted into knots. Oversized carpenter trousers were cut in sheer linen, while cork wedge mules seemed the perfect footwear for a chic stroll around a coastal town. Even the palette seemed lifted straight from the Mediterannean: muddy khakis were the shade of wet sand and a range of blues evoked deep sapphire waters. Some of the plain layered-chiffon dresses hung a touch too loosely on the body, but Waight Keller more than made up for them in her fabulous finale of metallic Swiss Dot numbers that hit the money spot between holiday cool and urban sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Akris

Creative director Albert Kriemler is a fashion dreamer and this season he fantasised over a fusion of natural materials in a safari-inspired collection. The results made for some fascinating surface effects; the rippling curves of wind-blown sandstone and granite, for example, made a graphic play on cotton or double-faced wool. Embroidered fabrics from his native St. Gallen were crossed with meandering patterns of holes on crisp white dresses, while a special lace came in a delicate honeycomb pattern. Our favourite piece, however, was a short dress whose embroidered appliqué of ruby red and Valencia orange had the effect of a glowing stained-glass window.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Akris

Creative director Albert Kriemler is a fashion dreamer and this season he fantasised over a fusion of natural materials in a safari-inspired collection. The results made for some fascinating surface effects; the rippling curves of wind-blown sandstone and granite, for example, made a graphic play on cotton or double-faced wool. Embroidered fabrics from his native St. Gallen were crossed with meandering patterns of holes on crisp white dresses, while a special lace came in a delicate honeycomb pattern. Our favourite piece, however, was a short dress whose embroidered appliqué of ruby red and Valencia orange had the effect of a glowing stained-glass window.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Akris

Creative director Albert Kriemler is a fashion dreamer and this season he fantasised over a fusion of natural materials in a safari-inspired collection. The results made for some fascinating surface effects; the rippling curves of wind-blown sandstone and granite, for example, made a graphic play on cotton or double-faced wool. Embroidered fabrics from his native St. Gallen were crossed with meandering patterns of holes on crisp white dresses, while a special lace came in a delicate honeycomb pattern. Our favourite piece, however, was a short dress whose embroidered appliqué of ruby red and Valencia orange had the effect of a glowing stained-glass window.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Akris

Creative director Albert Kriemler is a fashion dreamer and this season he fantasised over a fusion of natural materials in a safari-inspired collection. The results made for some fascinating surface effects; the rippling curves of wind-blown sandstone and granite, for example, made a graphic play on cotton or double-faced wool. Embroidered fabrics from his native St. Gallen were crossed with meandering patterns of holes on crisp white dresses, while a special lace came in a delicate honeycomb pattern. Our favourite piece, however, was a short dress whose embroidered appliqué of ruby red and Valencia orange had the effect of a glowing stained-glass window.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Akris

Creative director Albert Kriemler is a fashion dreamer and this season he fantasised over a fusion of natural materials in a safari-inspired collection. The results made for some fascinating surface effects; the rippling curves of wind-blown sandstone and granite, for example, made a graphic play on cotton or double-faced wool. Embroidered fabrics from his native St. Gallen were crossed with meandering patterns of holes on crisp white dresses, while a special lace came in a delicate honeycomb pattern. Our favourite piece, however, was a short dress whose embroidered appliqué of ruby red and Valencia orange had the effect of a glowing stained-glass window.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Givenchy

A car pile-up typically signifies disaster, but in Riccardo Tisci's case the broken, steaming vehicles at the centre of the round show space suggested a happy collision of ideas. Central to Tisci's mash-up was a strong African beat, courtesy of a band of drummers seated in the rafters - and later amplified by a pulse of bold textiles and graphic stripes. The Italian designer began calmly, with long desert-hued jersey dresses wrapped and draped into modern, bondage-inspired incarnations of Madame Grès' designs. The decoration then slowly built up as models emerged with colourful crystals adorning their faces (a feat that took make-up-artist Pat McGrath twelve excruciating hours), before unfolding into the finale of fabulous V-front gowns whose deep pleated slits reeve;ed glittering, cosmic colours underneath. In between, Tisci dazzled with flouncing feather-fronted tunics, cinnamon-coloured trouser suits and one-shouldered black crêpe jumpsuits worn over striped sequin vest tops.    

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Givenchy

A car pile-up typically signifies disaster, but in Riccardo Tisci's case the broken, steaming vehicles at the centre of the round show space suggested a happy collision of ideas. Central to Tisci's mash-up was a strong African beat, courtesy of a band of drummers seated in the rafters - and later amplified by a pulse of bold textiles and graphic stripes. The Italian designer began calmly, with long desert-hued jersey dresses wrapped and draped into modern, bondage-inspired incarnations of Madame Grès' designs. The decoration then slowly built up as models emerged with colourful crystals adorning their faces (a feat that took make-up-artist Pat McGrath twelve excruciating hours), before unfolding into the finale of fabulous V-front gowns whose deep pleated slits reeve;ed glittering, cosmic colours underneath. In between, Tisci dazzled with flouncing feather-fronted tunics, cinnamon-coloured trouser suits and one-shouldered black crêpe jumpsuits worn over striped sequin vest tops.    

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Givenchy

A car pile-up typically signifies disaster, but in Riccardo Tisci's case the broken, steaming vehicles at the centre of the round show space suggested a happy collision of ideas. Central to Tisci's mash-up was a strong African beat, courtesy of a band of drummers seated in the rafters - and later amplified by a pulse of bold textiles and graphic stripes. The Italian designer began calmly, with long desert-hued jersey dresses wrapped and draped into modern, bondage-inspired incarnations of Madame Grès' designs. The decoration then slowly built up as models emerged with colourful crystals adorning their faces (a feat that took make-up-artist Pat McGrath twelve excruciating hours), before unfolding into the finale of fabulous V-front gowns whose deep pleated slits reeve;ed glittering, cosmic colours underneath. In between, Tisci dazzled with flouncing feather-fronted tunics, cinnamon-coloured trouser suits and one-shouldered black crêpe jumpsuits worn over striped sequin vest tops.    

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Givenchy

A car pile-up typically signifies disaster, but in Riccardo Tisci's case the broken, steaming vehicles at the centre of the round show space suggested a happy collision of ideas. Central to Tisci's mash-up was a strong African beat, courtesy of a band of drummers seated in the rafters - and later amplified by a pulse of bold textiles and graphic stripes. The Italian designer began calmly, with long desert-hued jersey dresses wrapped and draped into modern, bondage-inspired incarnations of Madame Grès' designs. The decoration then slowly built up as models emerged with colourful crystals adorning their faces (a feat that took make-up-artist Pat McGrath twelve excruciating hours), before unfolding into the finale of fabulous V-front gowns whose deep pleated slits reeve;ed glittering, cosmic colours underneath. In between, Tisci dazzled with flouncing feather-fronted tunics, cinnamon-coloured trouser suits and one-shouldered black crêpe jumpsuits worn over striped sequin vest tops.    

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Givenchy

A car pile-up typically signifies disaster, but in Riccardo Tisci's case the broken, steaming vehicles at the centre of the round show space suggested a happy collision of ideas. Central to Tisci's mash-up was a strong African beat, courtesy of a band of drummers seated in the rafters - and later amplified by a pulse of bold textiles and graphic stripes. The Italian designer began calmly, with long desert-hued jersey dresses wrapped and draped into modern, bondage-inspired incarnations of Madame Grès' designs. The decoration then slowly built up as models emerged with colourful crystals adorning their faces (a feat that took make-up-artist Pat McGrath twelve excruciating hours), before unfolding into the finale of fabulous V-front gowns whose deep pleated slits reeve;ed glittering, cosmic colours underneath. In between, Tisci dazzled with flouncing feather-fronted tunics, cinnamon-coloured trouser suits and one-shouldered black crêpe jumpsuits worn over striped sequin vest tops.    

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney may be fashion's most high-profile vegetarian, but that doesn't mean she doesn't like to tap into her carnal side in her collections. In fact, the designer's steadfast stance on animal rights inspires originality in her use of faux skins. For Spring she dabbled in crocodile - one of the most covetable (and expensive) exotic skins poached by the fashion world. McCartney's imitation skin came shattered into individual scales and sewn up into a delicate appliqué on a tulle base. When it was applied to a white, A-line skirt and boxy shirt the effect was wonderfully graphic and modern. So too were the cocoon-shaped coats with reptilian textures and heavy silk arms. McCartney's shapes this season leaned forward, as they always do, to just the right side of cool. A cropped top in black crepe sat perfectly atop a shapely trouser that gathered at the ankle, while reams of black lace in disheveled daisy motifs overflowed with feminine folly under tulle skirts. Meat or no meat, this collection whetted our appetites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney may be fashion's most high-profile vegetarian, but that doesn't mean she doesn't like to tap into her carnal side in her collections. In fact, the designer's steadfast stance on animal rights inspires originality in her use of faux skins. For Spring she dabbled in crocodile - one of the most covetable (and expensive) exotic skins poached by the fashion world. McCartney's imitation skin came shattered into individual scales and sewn up into a delicate appliqué on a tulle base. When it was applied to a white, A-line skirt and boxy shirt the effect was wonderfully graphic and modern. So too were the cocoon-shaped coats with reptilian textures and heavy silk arms. McCartney's shapes this season leaned forward, as they always do, to just the right side of cool. A cropped top in black crepe sat perfectly atop a shapely trouser that gathered at the ankle, while reams of black lace in disheveled daisy motifs overflowed with feminine folly under tulle skirts. Meat or no meat, this collection whetted our appetites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney may be fashion's most high-profile vegetarian, but that doesn't mean she doesn't like to tap into her carnal side in her collections. In fact, the designer's steadfast stance on animal rights inspires originality in her use of faux skins. For Spring she dabbled in crocodile - one of the most covetable (and expensive) exotic skins poached by the fashion world. McCartney's imitation skin came shattered into individual scales and sewn up into a delicate appliqué on a tulle base. When it was applied to a white, A-line skirt and boxy shirt the effect was wonderfully graphic and modern. So too were the cocoon-shaped coats with reptilian textures and heavy silk arms. McCartney's shapes this season leaned forward, as they always do, to just the right side of cool. A cropped top in black crepe sat perfectly atop a shapely trouser that gathered at the ankle, while reams of black lace in disheveled daisy motifs overflowed with feminine folly under tulle skirts. Meat or no meat, this collection whetted our appetites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney may be fashion's most high-profile vegetarian, but that doesn't mean she doesn't like to tap into her carnal side in her collections. In fact, the designer's steadfast stance on animal rights inspires originality in her use of faux skins. For Spring she dabbled in crocodile - one of the most covetable (and expensive) exotic skins poached by the fashion world. McCartney's imitation skin came shattered into individual scales and sewn up into a delicate appliqué on a tulle base. When it was applied to a white, A-line skirt and boxy shirt the effect was wonderfully graphic and modern. So too were the cocoon-shaped coats with reptilian textures and heavy silk arms. McCartney's shapes this season leaned forward, as they always do, to just the right side of cool. A cropped top in black crepe sat perfectly atop a shapely trouser that gathered at the ankle, while reams of black lace in disheveled daisy motifs overflowed with feminine folly under tulle skirts. Meat or no meat, this collection whetted our appetites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney may be fashion's most high-profile vegetarian, but that doesn't mean she doesn't like to tap into her carnal side in her collections. In fact, the designer's steadfast stance on animal rights inspires originality in her use of faux skins. For Spring she dabbled in crocodile - one of the most covetable (and expensive) exotic skins poached by the fashion world. McCartney's imitation skin came shattered into individual scales and sewn up into a delicate appliqué on a tulle base. When it was applied to a white, A-line skirt and boxy shirt the effect was wonderfully graphic and modern. So too were the cocoon-shaped coats with reptilian textures and heavy silk arms. McCartney's shapes this season leaned forward, as they always do, to just the right side of cool. A cropped top in black crepe sat perfectly atop a shapely trouser that gathered at the ankle, while reams of black lace in disheveled daisy motifs overflowed with feminine folly under tulle skirts. Meat or no meat, this collection whetted our appetites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Sacai

There is currently a fashion frenzy brewing around hybrid clothing: designs that fuse multiple styles in a single garment. But Sacai designer Chitose Abe has been doing this very thing for years and has - unlike many of her peers - perfected the art of the pastiche. This season she drew heavily from the world of sports, combining perforated technical fabric with highbrow silk chiffons and satins. The loose shapes were sports-inspired as well this season with plenty of material blocking: wide-leg track pants had dramatic side slits; oversized shirt dresses teamed mesh with silk chiffon inserts; while sleeveless knit racer tops sprouted chiffon trains trimmed in fresh blue and white stripes. Sacai's signature architectural constructions got served up this season in a new palette of colours, from hot orange and blazing red, to brilliant green and royal blue. Abe is running circles around Paris’ fashion pack and, as per usual, is doing a fabulous job of it.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Sacai

There is currently a fashion frenzy brewing around hybrid clothing: designs that fuse multiple styles in a single garment. But Sacai designer Chitose Abe has been doing this very thing for years and has - unlike many of her peers - perfected the art of the pastiche. This season she drew heavily from the world of sports, combining perforated technical fabric with highbrow silk chiffons and satins. The loose shapes were sports-inspired as well this season with plenty of material blocking: wide-leg track pants had dramatic side slits; oversized shirt dresses teamed mesh with silk chiffon inserts; while sleeveless knit racer tops sprouted chiffon trains trimmed in fresh blue and white stripes. Sacai's signature architectural constructions got served up this season in a new palette of colours, from hot orange and blazing red, to brilliant green and royal blue. Abe is running circles around Paris’ fashion pack and, as per usual, is doing a fabulous job of it.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Sacai

There is currently a fashion frenzy brewing around hybrid clothing: designs that fuse multiple styles in a single garment. But Sacai designer Chitose Abe has been doing this very thing for years and has - unlike many of her peers - perfected the art of the pastiche. This season she drew heavily from the world of sports, combining perforated technical fabric with highbrow silk chiffons and satins. The loose shapes were sports-inspired as well this season with plenty of material blocking: wide-leg track pants had dramatic side slits; oversized shirt dresses teamed mesh with silk chiffon inserts; while sleeveless knit racer tops sprouted chiffon trains trimmed in fresh blue and white stripes. Sacai's signature architectural constructions got served up this season in a new palette of colours, from hot orange and blazing red, to brilliant green and royal blue. Abe is running circles around Paris’ fashion pack and, as per usual, is doing a fabulous job of it.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Sacai

There is currently a fashion frenzy brewing around hybrid clothing: designs that fuse multiple styles in a single garment. But Sacai designer Chitose Abe has been doing this very thing for years and has - unlike many of her peers - perfected the art of the pastiche. This season she drew heavily from the world of sports, combining perforated technical fabric with highbrow silk chiffons and satins. The loose shapes were sports-inspired as well this season with plenty of material blocking: wide-leg track pants had dramatic side slits; oversized shirt dresses teamed mesh with silk chiffon inserts; while sleeveless knit racer tops sprouted chiffon trains trimmed in fresh blue and white stripes. Sacai's signature architectural constructions got served up this season in a new palette of colours, from hot orange and blazing red, to brilliant green and royal blue. Abe is running circles around Paris’ fashion pack and, as per usual, is doing a fabulous job of it.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Sacai

There is currently a fashion frenzy brewing around hybrid clothing: designs that fuse multiple styles in a single garment. But Sacai designer Chitose Abe has been doing this very thing for years and has - unlike many of her peers - perfected the art of the pastiche. This season she drew heavily from the world of sports, combining perforated technical fabric with highbrow silk chiffons and satins. The loose shapes were sports-inspired as well this season with plenty of material blocking: wide-leg track pants had dramatic side slits; oversized shirt dresses teamed mesh with silk chiffon inserts; while sleeveless knit racer tops sprouted chiffon trains trimmed in fresh blue and white stripes. Sacai's signature architectural constructions got served up this season in a new palette of colours, from hot orange and blazing red, to brilliant green and royal blue. Abe is running circles around Paris’ fashion pack and, as per usual, is doing a fabulous job of it.
 
Writer: JJ Martin

Saint Laurent

After Saint Laurent's surprise grunge gateway last season, all prejudgments were suspended for Hedi Slimane’s third runway outing ­­­– much like the designer’s laser light  Grand Palais staging for Spring. Edie Campbell opened the show looking churlish, yet determined, her roughly cropped do and sharp shouldered mini dress pointing directly towards the 1980s power era. But what had noticeably changed this season was a more defined link to the house’s archives. Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic lip print, first seen at his 1971 ‘Vichy Chic’ collection, dressed up an abbreviated wrap dress, along with the finale’s bejewelled one shoulder puff sleeve top. Slimane also paid close attention to the iconic Le Smoking, re-imagined via the lean lines of his Dior Homme tenure. By day, he proposed Prince of Wales check, by night leather, over a sheer blouse – another key archive redux. Then taking on the styling duties himself, Slimane played with Lurex bobby-socks, kitten heeled Mary Janes and diamante drop earrings, (last worn in 1999 if we remember correctly), from the same year as dance-punk band Liars’ original edit of the show’s soundtrack Mr Your On Fire Mr.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Katrina Israel

Saint Laurent

After Saint Laurent's surprise grunge gateway last season, all prejudgments were suspended for Hedi Slimane’s third runway outing ­­­– much like the designer’s laser light  Grand Palais staging for Spring. Edie Campbell opened the show looking churlish, yet determined, her roughly cropped do and sharp shouldered mini dress pointing directly towards the 1980s power era. But what had noticeably changed this season was a more defined link to the house’s archives. Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic lip print, first seen at his 1971 ‘Vichy Chic’ collection, dressed up an abbreviated wrap dress, along with the finale’s bejewelled one shoulder puff sleeve top. Slimane also paid close attention to the iconic Le Smoking, re-imagined via the lean lines of his Dior Homme tenure. By day, he proposed Prince of Wales check, by night leather, over a sheer blouse – another key archive redux. Then taking on the styling duties himself, Slimane played with Lurex bobby-socks, kitten heeled Mary Janes and diamante drop earrings, (last worn in 1999 if we remember correctly), from the same year as dance-punk band Liars’ original edit of the show’s soundtrack Mr Your On Fire Mr.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Katrina Israel

Saint Laurent

After Saint Laurent's surprise grunge gateway last season, all prejudgments were suspended for Hedi Slimane’s third runway outing ­­­– much like the designer’s laser light  Grand Palais staging for Spring. Edie Campbell opened the show looking churlish, yet determined, her roughly cropped do and sharp shouldered mini dress pointing directly towards the 1980s power era. But what had noticeably changed this season was a more defined link to the house’s archives. Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic lip print, first seen at his 1971 ‘Vichy Chic’ collection, dressed up an abbreviated wrap dress, along with the finale’s bejewelled one shoulder puff sleeve top. Slimane also paid close attention to the iconic Le Smoking, re-imagined via the lean lines of his Dior Homme tenure. By day, he proposed Prince of Wales check, by night leather, over a sheer blouse – another key archive redux. Then taking on the styling duties himself, Slimane played with Lurex bobby-socks, kitten heeled Mary Janes and diamante drop earrings, (last worn in 1999 if we remember correctly), from the same year as dance-punk band Liars’ original edit of the show’s soundtrack Mr Your On Fire Mr.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Katrina Israel

Saint Laurent

After Saint Laurent's surprise grunge gateway last season, all prejudgments were suspended for Hedi Slimane’s third runway outing ­­­– much like the designer’s laser light  Grand Palais staging for Spring. Edie Campbell opened the show looking churlish, yet determined, her roughly cropped do and sharp shouldered mini dress pointing directly towards the 1980s power era. But what had noticeably changed this season was a more defined link to the house’s archives. Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic lip print, first seen at his 1971 ‘Vichy Chic’ collection, dressed up an abbreviated wrap dress, along with the finale’s bejewelled one shoulder puff sleeve top. Slimane also paid close attention to the iconic Le Smoking, re-imagined via the lean lines of his Dior Homme tenure. By day, he proposed Prince of Wales check, by night leather, over a sheer blouse – another key archive redux. Then taking on the styling duties himself, Slimane played with Lurex bobby-socks, kitten heeled Mary Janes and diamante drop earrings, (last worn in 1999 if we remember correctly), from the same year as dance-punk band Liars’ original edit of the show’s soundtrack Mr Your On Fire Mr.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Katrina Israel

Saint Laurent

After Saint Laurent's surprise grunge gateway last season, all prejudgments were suspended for Hedi Slimane’s third runway outing ­­­– much like the designer’s laser light  Grand Palais staging for Spring. Edie Campbell opened the show looking churlish, yet determined, her roughly cropped do and sharp shouldered mini dress pointing directly towards the 1980s power era. But what had noticeably changed this season was a more defined link to the house’s archives. Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic lip print, first seen at his 1971 ‘Vichy Chic’ collection, dressed up an abbreviated wrap dress, along with the finale’s bejewelled one shoulder puff sleeve top. Slimane also paid close attention to the iconic Le Smoking, re-imagined via the lean lines of his Dior Homme tenure. By day, he proposed Prince of Wales check, by night leather, over a sheer blouse – another key archive redux. Then taking on the styling duties himself, Slimane played with Lurex bobby-socks, kitten heeled Mary Janes and diamante drop earrings, (last worn in 1999 if we remember correctly), from the same year as dance-punk band Liars’ original edit of the show’s soundtrack Mr Your On Fire Mr.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Katrina Israel

Chanel

For Spring Karl Lagerfeld caught the art virus that is currently infecting fashion's top runways. Of course, he ran with it in his own, oversized way, starting with the larger than life fake art gallery that was installed inside Paris's Grand Palais. The scene looked bigger and better than most galleries and gave his spring Chanel show a crisp, well-lit canvas from which to view the clothes. Lagerfeld started off chicly with jackets and dresses that were cut with tunic proportions - elongated and lean with dramatic side slits that added a sexier edge to Chanel's classic boxy suits. The art part came on slowly at first, with the tweeds and boucles shot with flecks of neon and degrade colours taking on a grid-like configuration, and then blew up to an all-out art fest with a silk print featuring the blotched colour dabs of an artist's palette. Though the last three looks of the show were fantastic - popping out like collages of bright plastic on tweed - Lagerfeld still dazzles in his classic fare.  His navy and raspberry tweed suit with a cape back and full volume short skirt was a masterpiece of modern day chic.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chanel

For Spring Karl Lagerfeld caught the art virus that is currently infecting fashion's top runways. Of course, he ran with it in his own, oversized way, starting with the larger than life fake art gallery that was installed inside Paris' Grand Palais. The scene looked bigger and better than most galleries and gave his spring Chanel show a crisp, well-lit canvas from which to view the clothes. Lagerfeld started off chicly with jackets and dresses that were cut with tunic proportions - elongated and lean with dramatic side slits that added a sexier edge to Chanel's classic boxy suits. The art part came on slowly at first, with the tweeds and boucles shot with flecks of neon and degrade colours taking on a grid-like configuration, and then blew up to an all-out art fest with a silk print featuring the blotched colour dabs of an artist's palette. Though the last three looks of the show were fantastic - popping out like collages of bright plastic on tweed - Lagerfeld still dazzles in his classic fare.  His navy and raspberry tweed suit with a cape back and full volume short skirt was a masterpiece of modern day chic.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chanel

For Spring Karl Lagerfeld caught the art virus that is currently infecting fashion's top runways. Of course, he ran with it in his own, oversized way, starting with the larger than life fake art gallery that was installed inside Paris' Grand Palais. The scene looked bigger and better than most galleries and gave his spring Chanel show a crisp, well-lit canvas from which to view the clothes. Lagerfeld started off chicly with jackets and dresses that were cut with tunic proportions - elongated and lean with dramatic side slits that added a sexier edge to Chanel's classic boxy suits. The art part came on slowly at first, with the tweeds and boucles shot with flecks of neon and degrade colours taking on a grid-like configuration, and then blew up to an all-out art fest with a silk print featuring the blotched colour dabs of an artist's palette. Though the last three looks of the show were fantastic - popping out like collages of bright plastic on tweed - Lagerfeld still dazzles in his classic fare.  His navy and raspberry tweed suit with a cape back and full volume short skirt was a masterpiece of modern day chic.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chanel

For Spring Karl Lagerfeld caught the art virus that is currently infecting fashion's top runways. Of course, he ran with it in his own, oversized way, starting with the larger than life fake art gallery that was installed inside Paris' Grand Palais. The scene looked bigger and better than most galleries and gave his spring Chanel show a crisp, well-lit canvas from which to view the clothes. Lagerfeld started off chicly with jackets and dresses that were cut with tunic proportions - elongated and lean with dramatic side slits that added a sexier edge to Chanel's classic boxy suits. The art part came on slowly at first, with the tweeds and boucles shot with flecks of neon and degrade colours taking on a grid-like configuration, and then blew up to an all-out art fest with a silk print featuring the blotched colour dabs of an artist's palette. Though the last three looks of the show were fantastic - popping out like collages of bright plastic on tweed - Lagerfeld still dazzles in his classic fare.  His navy and raspberry tweed suit with a cape back and full volume short skirt was a masterpiece of modern day chic.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Chanel

For Spring Karl Lagerfeld caught the art virus that is currently infecting fashion's top runways. Of course, he ran with it in his own, oversized way, starting with the larger than life fake art gallery that was installed inside Paris' Grand Palais. The scene looked bigger and better than most galleries and gave his spring Chanel show a crisp, well-lit canvas from which to view the clothes. Lagerfeld started off chicly with jackets and dresses that were cut with tunic proportions - elongated and lean with dramatic side slits that added a sexier edge to Chanel's classic boxy suits. The art part came on slowly at first, with the tweeds and boucles shot with flecks of neon and degrade colours taking on a grid-like configuration, and then blew up to an all-out art fest with a silk print featuring the blotched colour dabs of an artist's palette. Though the last three looks of the show were fantastic - popping out like collages of bright plastic on tweed - Lagerfeld still dazzles in his classic fare.  His navy and raspberry tweed suit with a cape back and full volume short skirt was a masterpiece of modern day chic.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Valentino

The press notes that accompany a Valentino show are some of the most wordy in the industry. Which is ironic since the clothes designed by Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri can be summed in two short words: simply stunning. For Spring the design duo worked in their preferred silhouette of long-sleeved dresses and gowns cut generously to the floor or knees in sweeping column skirts. These vertical lines have always given a regal air to the Valentino house shapes, but this season the extraordinary materials were undoubtedly fit for a medieval Queen. From the first look out, a spectacular black poncho embroidered with bright African colours, the workmanship rose to zenith heights. Ornate thread embroideries crawled over lace, metal thread embroideries created an armour effect on black tulle gowns, while a streaking leopard print jacquard rejuvenated a passe pattern. Atop the heads, the Valentino signature studs were transformed into tiaras of leather bands with rows of flat metal coins, while the feet were cased in relaxed flat sandals. The effect was immaculate, intriguing and utterly beautiful. Who knows who will be able to afford these clothes? But we sure wish the entire world could wear them.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Valentino

The press notes that accompany a Valentino show are some of the most wordy in the industry. Which is ironic since the clothes designed by Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri can be summed in two short words: simply stunning. For Spring the design duo worked in their preferred silhouette of long-sleeved dresses and gowns cut generously to the floor or knees in sweeping column skirts. These vertical lines have always given a regal air to the Valentino house shapes, but this season the extraordinary materials were undoubtedly fit for a medieval Queen. From the first look out, a spectacular black poncho embroidered with bright African colours, the workmanship rose to zenith heights. Ornate thread embroideries crawled over lace, metal thread embroideries created an armour effect on black tulle gowns, while a streaking leopard print jacquard rejuvenated a passe pattern. Atop the heads, the Valentino signature studs were transformed into tiaras of leather bands with rows of flat metal coins, while the feet were cased in relaxed flat sandals. The effect was immaculate, intriguing and utterly beautiful. Who knows who will be able to afford these clothes? But we sure wish the entire world could wear them.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Valentino

The press notes that accompany a Valentino show are some of the most wordy in the industry. Which is ironic since the clothes designed by Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri can be summed in two short words: simply stunning. For Spring the design duo worked in their preferred silhouette of long-sleeved dresses and gowns cut generously to the floor or knees in sweeping column skirts. These vertical lines have always given a regal air to the Valentino house shapes, but this season the extraordinary materials were undoubtedly fit for a medieval Queen. From the first look out, a spectacular black poncho embroidered with bright African colours, the workmanship rose to zenith heights. Ornate thread embroideries crawled over lace, metal thread embroideries created an armour effect on black tulle gowns, while a streaking leopard print jacquard rejuvenated a passe pattern. Atop the heads, the Valentino signature studs were transformed into tiaras of leather bands with rows of flat metal coins, while the feet were cased in relaxed flat sandals. The effect was immaculate, intriguing and utterly beautiful. Who knows who will be able to afford these clothes? But we sure wish the entire world could wear them.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Valentino

The press notes that accompany a Valentino show are some of the most wordy in the industry. Which is ironic since the clothes designed by Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri can be summed in two short words: simply stunning. For Spring the design duo worked in their preferred silhouette of long-sleeved dresses and gowns cut generously to the floor or knees in sweeping column skirts. These vertical lines have always given a regal air to the Valentino house shapes, but this season the extraordinary materials were undoubtedly fit for a medieval Queen. From the first look out, a spectacular black poncho embroidered with bright African colours, the workmanship rose to zenith heights. Ornate thread embroideries crawled over lace, metal thread embroideries created an armour effect on black tulle gowns, while a streaking leopard print jacquard rejuvenated a passe pattern. Atop the heads, the Valentino signature studs were transformed into tiaras of leather bands with rows of flat metal coins, while the feet were cased in relaxed flat sandals. The effect was immaculate, intriguing and utterly beautiful. Who knows who will be able to afford these clothes? But we sure wish the entire world could wear them.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Valentino

The press notes that accompany a Valentino show are some of the most wordy in the industry. Which is ironic since the clothes designed by Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri can be summed in two short words: simply stunning. For Spring the design duo worked in their preferred silhouette of long-sleeved dresses and gowns cut generously to the floor or knees in sweeping column skirts. These vertical lines have always given a regal air to the Valentino house shapes, but this season the extraordinary materials were undoubtedly fit for a medieval Queen. From the first look out, a spectacular black poncho embroidered with bright African colours, the workmanship rose to zenith heights. Ornate thread embroideries crawled over lace, metal thread embroideries created an armour effect on black tulle gowns, while a streaking leopard print jacquard rejuvenated a passe pattern. Atop the heads, the Valentino signature studs were transformed into tiaras of leather bands with rows of flat metal coins, while the feet were cased in relaxed flat sandals. The effect was immaculate, intriguing and utterly beautiful. Who knows who will be able to afford these clothes? But we sure wish the entire world could wear them.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans  Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander McQueen

From the looks of her exquisitely sculpted and embellished tribal warrior collection for spring, Sarah Burton has no plans to put on the breaks on her couture level craft at the house of McQueen. The workmanship of these clothes bubbles at a level that is never reached, nor even approximated by her ready-to-wear fashion peers. This season, the designer channelled a tribal influence with intricate, high octane coloured micro beading and fierce feather work. But these clothes were far from primitive. Burton cut a razor sharp silhouette that was taught and severe up top, while frilled and flouncy down below. She worked in complex yards of micro worked leather, velvet and lace, most of which had been laser-cut to create ornate lattice patterns. The tension between ultra feminine flou and extreme edge was present in nearly every look and underlined by graphic geometric motifs - circles, stripes, and boxes created by the magnificent handiwork. Gold metal armbands and shiny head helmets added an intergalactic edge. One never fully understood, while witnessing this superb collection, where exactly these creatures came from or where they were headed, but they were packing major girl power and painstaking fashion prowess to boot.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander McQueen

From the looks of her exquisitely sculpted and embellished tribal warrior collection for spring, Sarah Burton has no plans to put on the breaks on her couture level craft at the house of McQueen. The workmanship of these clothes bubbles at a level that is never reached, nor even approximated by her ready-to-wear fashion peers. This season, the designer channelled a tribal influence with intricate, high octane coloured micro beading and fierce feather work. But these clothes were far from primitive. Burton cut a razor sharp silhouette that was taught and severe up top, while frilled and flouncy down below. She worked in complex yards of micro worked leather, velvet and lace, most of which had been laser-cut to create ornate lattice patterns. The tension between ultra feminine flou and extreme edge was present in nearly every look and underlined by graphic geometric motifs - circles, stripes, and boxes created by the magnificent handiwork. Gold metal armbands and shiny head helmets added an intergalactic edge. One never fully understood, while witnessing this superb collection, where exactly these creatures came from or where they were headed, but they were packing major girl power and painstaking fashion prowess to boot.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander McQueen

From the looks of her exquisitely sculpted and embellished tribal warrior collection for spring, Sarah Burton has no plans to put on the breaks on her couture level craft at the house of McQueen. The workmanship of these clothes bubbles at a level that is never reached, nor even approximated by her ready-to-wear fashion peers. This season, the designer channelled a tribal influence with intricate, high octane coloured micro beading and fierce feather work. But these clothes were far from primitive. Burton cut a razor sharp silhouette that was taught and severe up top, while frilled and flouncy down below. She worked in complex yards of micro worked leather, velvet and lace, most of which had been laser-cut to create ornate lattice patterns. The tension between ultra feminine flou and extreme edge was present in nearly every look and underlined by graphic geometric motifs - circles, stripes, and boxes created by the magnificent handiwork. Gold metal armbands and shiny head helmets added an intergalactic edge. One never fully understood, while witnessing this superb collection, where exactly these creatures came from or where they were headed, but they were packing major girl power and painstaking fashion prowess to boot.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander McQueen

From the looks of her exquisitely sculpted and embellished tribal warrior collection for spring, Sarah Burton has no plans to put on the breaks on her couture level craft at the house of McQueen. The workmanship of these clothes bubbles at a level that is never reached, nor even approximated by her ready-to-wear fashion peers. This season, the designer channelled a tribal influence with intricate, high octane coloured micro beading and fierce feather work. But these clothes were far from primitive. Burton cut a razor sharp silhouette that was taught and severe up top, while frilled and flouncy down below. She worked in complex yards of micro worked leather, velvet and lace, most of which had been laser-cut to create ornate lattice patterns. The tension between ultra feminine flou and extreme edge was present in nearly every look and underlined by graphic geometric motifs - circles, stripes, and boxes created by the magnificent handiwork. Gold metal armbands and shiny head helmets added an intergalactic edge. One never fully understood, while witnessing this superb collection, where exactly these creatures came from or where they were headed, but they were packing major girl power and painstaking fashion prowess to boot.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Alexander McQueen

From the looks of her exquisitely sculpted and embellished tribal warrior collection for spring, Sarah Burton has no plans to put on the breaks on her couture level craft at the house of McQueen. The workmanship of these clothes bubbles at a level that is never reached, nor even approximated by her ready-to-wear fashion peers. This season, the designer channelled a tribal influence with intricate, high octane coloured micro beading and fierce feather work. But these clothes were far from primitive. Burton cut a razor sharp silhouette that was taught and severe up top, while frilled and flouncy down below. She worked in complex yards of micro worked leather, velvet and lace, most of which had been laser-cut to create ornate lattice patterns. The tension between ultra feminine flou and extreme edge was present in nearly every look and underlined by graphic geometric motifs - circles, stripes, and boxes created by the magnificent handiwork. Gold metal armbands and shiny head helmets added an intergalactic edge. One never fully understood, while witnessing this superb collection, where exactly these creatures came from or where they were headed, but they were packing major girl power and painstaking fashion prowess to boot.

Photographer: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Louis Vuitton

Was this really Marc Jacobs' last show for Louis Vuitton? Though there weren't any official communications issued prior to the show from either the designer or the French luxury goods house he's helmed for 14 years, the mood inside the Louvre's Cour Carrée was decidedly dour. A well known showman, Jacobs created an amalgam of his top show sets over the years, bringing bits and pieces of each (a small carousel, two escalators, two elevators, one set of hotel room doors and a fountain) but covering them in a blanket of black, as if they'd been burnt to a crisp. On the runway, not a single colour (save for a few blue denim pieces) emerged on the clothes either. The models were draped in funeral black from the tips of their flat boot toes to the tops of their heads, on which were perched Indian princess feathered headdresses. This was, however, no dowdy wake. Jacobs bejewelled his designs, covering even the black tulle bodysuits in acres of jet, crystal and sequin embroideries and tufts of feathers. There were touches of his key contributions at the house, such as a model whose naked body had been graffitied with Stephen Sprouse glittering paint. But Jacobs also introduced cool new looks, like his black denim jeans that were cut low and loose with cuffed ankles. These too came jazzed with sparkle and showed off Jacob’s facile mastery of a downtown girl’s wardrobe. The only thing obviously missing from this show were the handbags - the bread and butter of the Vuitton brand behemoth. Was that on purpose? We'll never know. Right after this show ended, a formal announcement confirmed that the spring show was Jacobs’s last. Now we all have something to truly mourn about.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Louis Vuitton

Was this really Marc Jacobs' last show for Louis Vuitton? Though there weren't any official communications issued prior to the show from either the designer or the French luxury goods house he's helmed for 14 years, the mood inside the Louvre's Cour Carrée was decidedly dour. A well known showman, Jacobs created an amalgam of his top show sets over the years, bringing bits and pieces of each (a small carousel, two escalators, two elevators, one set of hotel room doors and a fountain) but covering them in a blanket of black, as if they'd been burnt to a crisp. On the runway, not a single colour (save for a few blue denim pieces) emerged on the clothes either. The models were draped in funeral black from the tips of their flat boot toes to the tops of their heads, on which were perched Indian princess feathered headdresses. This was, however, no dowdy wake. Jacobs bejewelled his designs, covering even the black tulle bodysuits in acres of jet, crystal and sequin embroideries and tufts of feathers. There were touches of his key contributions at the house, such as a model whose naked body had been graffitied with Stephen Sprouse glittering paint. But Jacobs also introduced cool new looks, like his black denim jeans that were cut low and loose with cuffed ankles. These too came jazzed with sparkle and showed off Jacob’s facile mastery of a downtown girl’s wardrobe. The only thing obviously missing from this show were the handbags - the bread and butter of the Vuitton brand behemoth. Was that on purpose? We'll never know. Right after this show ended, a formal announcement confirmed that the spring show was Jacobs’s last. Now we all have something to truly mourn about.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Louis Vuitton

Was this really Marc Jacobs' last show for Louis Vuitton? Though there weren't any official communications issued prior to the show from either the designer or the French luxury goods house he's helmed for 14 years, the mood inside the Louvre's Cour Carrée was decidedly dour. A well known showman, Jacobs created an amalgam of his top show sets over the years, bringing bits and pieces of each (a small carousel, two escalators, two elevators, one set of hotel room doors and a fountain) but covering them in a blanket of black, as if they'd been burnt to a crisp. On the runway, not a single colour (save for a few blue denim pieces) emerged on the clothes either. The models were draped in funeral black from the tips of their flat boot toes to the tops of their heads, on which were perched Indian princess feathered headdresses. This was, however, no dowdy wake. Jacobs bejewelled his designs, covering even the black tulle bodysuits in acres of jet, crystal and sequin embroideries and tufts of feathers. There were touches of his key contributions at the house, such as a model whose naked body had been graffitied with Stephen Sprouse glittering paint. But Jacobs also introduced cool new looks, like his black denim jeans that were cut low and loose with cuffed ankles. These too came jazzed with sparkle and showed off Jacob’s facile mastery of a downtown girl’s wardrobe. The only thing obviously missing from this show were the handbags - the bread and butter of the Vuitton brand behemoth. Was that on purpose? We'll never know. Right after this show ended, a formal announcement confirmed that the spring show was Jacobs’s last. Now we all have something to truly mourn about.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Louis Vuitton

Was this really Marc Jacobs' last show for Louis Vuitton? Though there weren't any official communications issued prior to the show from either the designer or the French luxury goods house he's helmed for 14 years, the mood inside the Louvre's Cour Carrée was decidedly dour. A well known showman, Jacobs created an amalgam of his top show sets over the years, bringing bits and pieces of each (a small carousel, two escalators, two elevators, one set of hotel room doors and a fountain) but covering them in a blanket of black, as if they'd been burnt to a crisp. On the runway, not a single colour (save for a few blue denim pieces) emerged on the clothes either. The models were draped in funeral black from the tips of their flat boot toes to the tops of their heads, on which were perched Indian princess feathered headdresses. This was, however, no dowdy wake. Jacobs bejewelled his designs, covering even the black tulle bodysuits in acres of jet, crystal and sequin embroideries and tufts of feathers. There were touches of his key contributions at the house, such as a model whose naked body had been graffitied with Stephen Sprouse glittering paint. But Jacobs also introduced cool new looks, like his black denim jeans that were cut low and loose with cuffed ankles. These too came jazzed with sparkle and showed off Jacob’s facile mastery of a downtown girl’s wardrobe. The only thing obviously missing from this show were the handbags - the bread and butter of the Vuitton brand behemoth. Was that on purpose? We'll never know. Right after this show ended, a formal announcement confirmed that the spring show was Jacobs’s last. Now we all have something to truly mourn about.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Louis Vuitton

Was this really Marc Jacobs' last show for Louis Vuitton? Though there weren't any official communications issued prior to the show from either the designer or the French luxury goods house he's helmed for 14 years, the mood inside the Louvre's Cour Carrée was decidedly dour. A well known showman, Jacobs created an amalgam of his top show sets over the years, bringing bits and pieces of each (a small carousel, two escalators, two elevators, one set of hotel room doors and a fountain) but covering them in a blanket of black, as if they'd been burnt to a crisp. On the runway, not a single colour (save for a few blue denim pieces) emerged on the clothes either. The models were draped in funeral black from the tips of their flat boot toes to the tops of their heads, on which were perched Indian princess feathered headdresses. This was, however, no dowdy wake. Jacobs bejewelled his designs, covering even the black tulle bodysuits in acres of jet, crystal and sequin embroideries and tufts of feathers. There were touches of his key contributions at the house, such as a model whose naked body had been graffitied with Stephen Sprouse glittering paint. But Jacobs also introduced cool new looks, like his black denim jeans that were cut low and loose with cuffed ankles. These too came jazzed with sparkle and showed off Jacob’s facile mastery of a downtown girl’s wardrobe. The only thing obviously missing from this show were the handbags - the bread and butter of the Vuitton brand behemoth. Was that on purpose? We'll never know. Right after this show ended, a formal announcement confirmed that the spring show was Jacobs’s last. Now we all have something to truly mourn about.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Vionnet

The clean and starched man's shirt came firmly back into the woman's wardrobe this season. At Vionnet, a house steeped in femininity, creative director Goga Ashkenazi used the sober staple to inject new life into the house's signature draping techniques. From the start, Ashkenazi cut her shirts into column gowns with sleeves, which came in robin’s egg blue or lemon chiffon, and then draped them in delicate layers of fine plissé tulle in the same tone. This might have easily ended up as a messy exercise but the results were crisp and cool given the use of a single colour and a tightly bound waist that gave the hips a neat finish. Ashkenazi, an energetic multi-tasker, is finding her balance at this storied house and is doing a solid job at playing with its traditions and adding innovative techniques. Two perfect cases in point? The degrade plissé gowns with geometric constructions and diamond-shaped cut-outs, worn over jersey t-shirts; and the magnificent Lesage embroidered plastic and crystal web, worn as a cape over a flowing baby blue plissé skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Vionnet

The clean and starched man's shirt came firmly back into the woman's wardrobe this season. At Vionnet, a house steeped in femininity, creative director Goga Ashkenazi used the sober staple to inject new life into the house's signature draping techniques. From the start, Ashkenazi cut her shirts into column gowns with sleeves, which came in robin’s egg blue or lemon chiffon, and then draped them in delicate layers of fine plissé tulle in the same tone. This might have easily ended up as a messy exercise but the results were crisp and cool given the use of a single colour and a tightly bound waist that gave the hips a neat finish. Ashkenazi, an energetic multi-tasker, is finding her balance at this storied house and is doing a solid job at playing with its traditions and adding innovative techniques. Two perfect cases in point? The degrade plissé gowns with geometric constructions and diamond-shaped cut-outs, worn over jersey t-shirts; and the magnificent Lesage embroidered plastic and crystal web, worn as a cape over a flowing baby blue plissé skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Vionnet

The clean and starched man's shirt came firmly back into the woman's wardrobe this season. At Vionnet, a house steeped in femininity, creative director Goga Ashkenazi used the sober staple to inject new life into the house's signature draping techniques. From the start, Ashkenazi cut her shirts into column gowns with sleeves, which came in robin’s egg blue or lemon chiffon, and then draped them in delicate layers of fine plissé tulle in the same tone. This might have easily ended up as a messy exercise but the results were crisp and cool given the use of a single colour and a tightly bound waist that gave the hips a neat finish. Ashkenazi, an energetic multi-tasker, is finding her balance at this storied house and is doing a solid job at playing with its traditions and adding innovative techniques. Two perfect cases in point? The degrade plissé gowns with geometric constructions and diamond-shaped cut-outs, worn over jersey t-shirts; and the magnificent Lesage embroidered plastic and crystal web, worn as a cape over a flowing baby blue plissé skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Vionnet

The clean and starched man's shirt came firmly back into the woman's wardrobe this season. At Vionnet, a house steeped in femininity, creative director Goga Ashkenazi used the sober staple to inject new life into the house's signature draping techniques. From the start, Ashkenazi cut her shirts into column gowns with sleeves, which came in robin’s egg blue or lemon chiffon, and then draped them in delicate layers of fine plissé tulle in the same tone. This might have easily ended up as a messy exercise but the results were crisp and cool given the use of a single colour and a tightly bound waist that gave the hips a neat finish. Ashkenazi, an energetic multi-tasker, is finding her balance at this storied house and is doing a solid job at playing with its traditions and adding innovative techniques. Two perfect cases in point? The degrade plissé gowns with geometric constructions and diamond-shaped cut-outs, worn over jersey t-shirts; and the magnificent Lesage embroidered plastic and crystal web, worn as a cape over a flowing baby blue plissé skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Vionnet

The clean and starched man's shirt came firmly back into the woman's wardrobe this season. At Vionnet, a house steeped in femininity, creative director Goga Ashkenazi used the sober staple to inject new life into the house's signature draping techniques. From the start, Ashkenazi cut her shirts into column gowns with sleeves, which came in robin’s egg blue or lemon chiffon, and then draped them in delicate layers of fine plissé tulle in the same tone. This might have easily ended up as a messy exercise but the results were crisp and cool given the use of a single colour and a tightly bound waist that gave the hips a neat finish. Ashkenazi, an energetic multi-tasker, is finding her balance at this storied house and is doing a solid job at playing with its traditions and adding innovative techniques. Two perfect cases in point? The degrade plissé gowns with geometric constructions and diamond-shaped cut-outs, worn over jersey t-shirts; and the magnificent Lesage embroidered plastic and crystal web, worn as a cape over a flowing baby blue plissé skirt.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

The dream team behind Moncler has never met an outdoor expedition it couldn't conquer. And for spring, the brand is the skate-boarding king of the jungle. To set the scene, there was a steamy tangle of exotic flowers dangling over the runway (shaping up to be a trend this season). This paved the way for a riot of animal prints - leopard, tiger and giraffe - bundled in clean shapes, crafted from ultra luxe materials and dressed in sporty details. The pieces were masterfully created (sleeveless zip front coats and hooded, pocketed shift dresses made from animal prints were collaged together with piles of fluffy ostrich or pheasant feathers). They reflected creative director Giambattista Valli’s natural knack for hybrid assemblies of outerwear and eveningwear. Where the roar came in was with the skaters, who sped down the runway, doing circles around the models and a couple of men wearing nothing but sleeping bags and jogging tights. It was hard to imagine these guys really roughing it in the wilderness. But who really cares? Moncler has turned its shows into campy fun and as long as Valli continues to refract their cool sport through his lens of impeccable style, this is a winning formula. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

The dream team behind Moncler has never met an outdoor expedition it couldn't conquer. And for spring, the brand is the skate-boarding king of the jungle. To set the scene, there was a steamy tangle of exotic flowers dangling over the runway (shaping up to be a trend this season). This paved the way for a riot of animal prints - leopard, tiger and giraffe - bundled in clean shapes, crafted from ultra luxe materials and dressed in sporty details. The pieces were masterfully created (sleeveless zip front coats and hooded, pocketed shift dresses made from animal prints were collaged together with piles of fluffy ostrich or pheasant feathers). They reflected creative director Giambattista Valli’s natural knack for hybrid assemblies of outerwear and eveningwear. Where the roar came in was with the skaters, who sped down the runway, doing circles around the models and a couple of men wearing nothing but sleeping bags and jogging tights. It was hard to imagine these guys really roughing it in the wilderness. But who really cares? Moncler has turned its shows into campy fun and as long as Valli continues to refract their cool sport through his lens of impeccable style, this is a winning formula. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

The dream team behind Moncler has never met an outdoor expedition it couldn't conquer. And for spring, the brand is the skate-boarding king of the jungle. To set the scene, there was a steamy tangle of exotic flowers dangling over the runway (shaping up to be a trend this season). This paved the way for a riot of animal prints - leopard, tiger and giraffe - bundled in clean shapes, crafted from ultra luxe materials and dressed in sporty details. The pieces were masterfully created (sleeveless zip front coats and hooded, pocketed shift dresses made from animal prints were collaged together with piles of fluffy ostrich or pheasant feathers). They reflected creative director Giambattista Valli’s natural knack for hybrid assemblies of outerwear and eveningwear. Where the roar came in was with the skaters, who sped down the runway, doing circles around the models and a couple of men wearing nothing but sleeping bags and jogging tights. It was hard to imagine these guys really roughing it in the wilderness. But who really cares? Moncler has turned its shows into campy fun and as long as Valli continues to refract their cool sport through his lens of impeccable style, this is a winning formula. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

The dream team behind Moncler has never met an outdoor expedition it couldn't conquer. And for spring, the brand is the skate-boarding king of the jungle. To set the scene, there was a steamy tangle of exotic flowers dangling over the runway (shaping up to be a trend this season). This paved the way for a riot of animal prints - leopard, tiger and giraffe - bundled in clean shapes, crafted from ultra luxe materials and dressed in sporty details. The pieces were masterfully created (sleeveless zip front coats and hooded, pocketed shift dresses made from animal prints were collaged together with piles of fluffy ostrich or pheasant feathers). They reflected creative director Giambattista Valli’s natural knack for hybrid assemblies of outerwear and eveningwear. Where the roar came in was with the skaters, who sped down the runway, doing circles around the models and a couple of men wearing nothing but sleeping bags and jogging tights. It was hard to imagine these guys really roughing it in the wilderness. But who really cares? Moncler has turned its shows into campy fun and as long as Valli continues to refract their cool sport through his lens of impeccable style, this is a winning formula. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

The dream team behind Moncler has never met an outdoor expedition it couldn't conquer. And for spring, the brand is the skate-boarding king of the jungle. To set the scene, there was a steamy tangle of exotic flowers dangling over the runway (shaping up to be a trend this season). This paved the way for a riot of animal prints - leopard, tiger and giraffe - bundled in clean shapes, crafted from ultra luxe materials and dressed in sporty details. The pieces were masterfully created (sleeveless zip front coats and hooded, pocketed shift dresses made from animal prints were collaged together with piles of fluffy ostrich or pheasant feathers). They reflected creative director Giambattista Valli’s natural knack for hybrid assemblies of outerwear and eveningwear. Where the roar came in was with the skaters, who sped down the runway, doing circles around the models and a couple of men wearing nothing but sleeping bags and jogging tights. It was hard to imagine these guys really roughing it in the wilderness. But who really cares? Moncler has turned its shows into campy fun and as long as Valli continues to refract their cool sport through his lens of impeccable style, this is a winning formula. 

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Miu Miu

Much like Prada’s art-led show space in Milan, this season the Miu Miu set in Paris was just as seductive and enticing as the clothes. Miuccia Prada wrapped her normally sober show space at the Palais d’Iéna in a brilliant explosion of patterned wallpapers, shored it with carpet under foot and placed bespoke pieces of furniture in every corner. The effect was cosy yet bold, and flavoured with a retro quaintness - just like the clothes themselves. Last season’s lean, mean silhouette gave way to a new fascination with 1960s proportions: the skirts were mini, the jackets were boxy, the back-belted coats were A-line, and everything came decorated with contrast-trimmed pockets and oversized buttons.  More than the sum of their shapes, the new pieces in this collection centered on colour. The designer dazzled in combinations such as lemon chiffon, cherry red and turquoise; pink, red and wine; red and navy racer stripes on bright white; and sea green with fuchsia. The shorter skirt length allowed the designer to show off a set of white knit tights that were fresh foil for the candy-bright patent leather Mary Janes. There may not be a huge demand for pastel mink coats cut in vintage shapes in the summer, but the cocktail dresses swinging in crystal degrade fringe, and fabulous intarsia with motifs borrowed from the show's wallpaper are going to drive Miu Miu’s women nuts come springtime.

Miu Miu

Much like Prada’s art-led show space in Milan, this season the Miu Miu set in Paris was just as seductive and enticing as the clothes. Miuccia Prada wrapped her normally sober show space at the Palais d’Iéna in a brilliant explosion of patterned wallpapers, shored it with carpet under foot and placed bespoke pieces of furniture in every corner. The effect was cosy yet bold, and flavoured with a retro quaintness - just like the clothes themselves. Last season’s lean, mean silhouette gave way to a new fascination with 1960s proportions: the skirts were mini, the jackets were boxy, the back-belted coats were A-line, and everything came decorated with contrast-trimmed pockets and oversized buttons.  More than the sum of their shapes, the new pieces in this collection centered on colour. The designer dazzled in combinations such as lemon chiffon, cherry red and turquoise; pink, red and wine; red and navy racer stripes on bright white; and sea green with fuchsia. The shorter skirt length allowed the designer to show off a set of white knit tights that were fresh foil for the candy-bright patent leather Mary Janes. There may not be a huge demand for pastel mink coats cut in vintage shapes in the summer, but the cocktail dresses swinging in crystal degrade fringe, and fabulous intarsia with motifs borrowed from the show's wallpaper are going to drive Miu Miu’s women nuts come springtime.

Miu Miu

Much like Prada’s art-led show space in Milan, this season the Miu Miu set in Paris was just as seductive and enticing as the clothes. Miuccia Prada wrapped her normally sober show space at the Palais d’Iéna in a brilliant explosion of patterned wallpapers, shored it with carpet under foot and placed bespoke pieces of furniture in every corner. The effect was cosy yet bold, and flavoured with a retro quaintness - just like the clothes themselves. Last season’s lean, mean silhouette gave way to a new fascination with 1960s proportions: the skirts were mini, the jackets were boxy, the back-belted coats were A-line, and everything came decorated with contrast-trimmed pockets and oversized buttons.  More than the sum of their shapes, the new pieces in this collection centered on colour. The designer dazzled in combinations such as lemon chiffon, cherry red and turquoise; pink, red and wine; red and navy racer stripes on bright white; and sea green with fuchsia. The shorter skirt length allowed the designer to show off a set of white knit tights that were fresh foil for the candy-bright patent leather Mary Janes. There may not be a huge demand for pastel mink coats cut in vintage shapes in the summer, but the cocktail dresses swinging in crystal degrade fringe, and fabulous intarsia with motifs borrowed from the show's wallpaper are going to drive Miu Miu’s women nuts come springtime.

Miu Miu

Much like Prada’s art-led show space in Milan, this season the Miu Miu set in Paris was just as seductive and enticing as the clothes. Miuccia Prada wrapped her normally sober show space at the Palais d’Iéna in a brilliant explosion of patterned wallpapers, shored it with carpet under foot and placed bespoke pieces of furniture in every corner. The effect was cosy yet bold, and flavoured with a retro quaintness - just like the clothes themselves. Last season’s lean, mean silhouette gave way to a new fascination with 1960s proportions: the skirts were mini, the jackets were boxy, the back-belted coats were A-line, and everything came decorated with contrast-trimmed pockets and oversized buttons.  More than the sum of their shapes, the new pieces in this collection centered on colour. The designer dazzled in combinations such as lemon chiffon, cherry red and turquoise; pink, red and wine; red and navy racer stripes on bright white; and sea green with fuchsia. The shorter skirt length allowed the designer to show off a set of white knit tights that were fresh foil for the candy-bright patent leather Mary Janes. There may not be a huge demand for pastel mink coats cut in vintage shapes in the summer, but the cocktail dresses swinging in crystal degrade fringe, and fabulous intarsia with motifs borrowed from the show's wallpaper are going to drive Miu Miu’s women nuts come springtime.

Miu Miu

Much like Prada’s art-led show space in Milan, this season the Miu Miu set in Paris was just as seductive and enticing as the clothes. Miuccia Prada wrapped her normally sober show space at the Palais d’Iéna in a brilliant explosion of patterned wallpapers, shored it with carpet under foot and placed bespoke pieces of furniture in every corner. The effect was cosy yet bold, and flavoured with a retro quaintness - just like the clothes themselves. Last season’s lean, mean silhouette gave way to a new fascination with 1960s proportions: the skirts were mini, the jackets were boxy, the back-belted coats were A-line, and everything came decorated with contrast-trimmed pockets and oversized buttons.  More than the sum of their shapes, the new pieces in this collection centered on colour. The designer dazzled in combinations such as lemon chiffon, cherry red and turquoise; pink, red and wine; red and navy racer stripes on bright white; and sea green with fuchsia. The shorter skirt length allowed the designer to show off a set of white knit tights that were fresh foil for the candy-bright patent leather Mary Janes. There may not be a huge demand for pastel mink coats cut in vintage shapes in the summer, but the cocktail dresses swinging in crystal degrade fringe, and fabulous intarsia with motifs borrowed from the show's wallpaper are going to drive Miu Miu’s women nuts come springtime.

Hermès

Creative director Christophe Lemaire paired a few styles that normally wouldn’t sit comfortably together in the same collection: his clothes looked crisp, yet relaxed, and casual, yet expensive, all at once. The ease came in the shapes. This is a designer whose roots in sportswear (at tennis-friendly label Lacoste) mean that he's not likely to over think silhouettes. He cut mid-calf skirts and trousers in a body-flattering line, while waists were cinched but never too tightly. Silk sleeves fluttered, and linen collars were stiffened with an air of regal grace. What the designer nailed previously in his Fall collection, and happily refined for Spring, was his pitch perfect colour palette and use of impeccably crafted luxe materials. Olive crocodile culottes? A suede prairie skirt in a buttery peacock blue and bottle green? A buttonless pine green leather coat? They were all utter perfection. As was Lemaire's plunge into graphic patterns this season, at times seemingly Aztec-inspired, such as his striking turquoise, cherry red and grass green printed pant and matching top.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Hermès

Creative director Christophe Lemaire paired a few styles that normally wouldn’t sit comfortably together in the same collection: his clothes looked crisp, yet relaxed, and casual, yet expensive, all at once. The ease came in the shapes. This is a designer whose roots in sportswear (at tennis-friendly label Lacoste) mean that he's not likely to over think silhouettes. He cut mid-calf skirts and trousers in a body-flattering line, while waists were cinched but never too tightly. Silk sleeves fluttered, and linen collars were stiffened with an air of regal grace. What the designer nailed previously in his Fall collection, and happily refined for Spring, was his pitch perfect colour palette and use of impeccably crafted luxe materials. Olive crocodile culottes? A suede prairie skirt in a buttery peacock blue and bottle green? A buttonless pine green leather coat? They were all utter perfection. As was Lemaire's plunge into graphic patterns this season, at times seemingly Aztec-inspired, such as his striking turquoise, cherry red and grass green printed pant and matching top.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Hermès

Creative director Christophe Lemaire paired a few styles that normally wouldn’t sit comfortably together in the same collection: his clothes looked crisp, yet relaxed, and casual, yet expensive, all at once. The ease came in the shapes. This is a designer whose roots in sportswear (at tennis-friendly label Lacoste) mean that he's not likely to over think silhouettes. He cut mid-calf skirts and trousers in a body-flattering line, while waists were cinched but never too tightly. Silk sleeves fluttered, and linen collars were stiffened with an air of regal grace. What the designer nailed previously in his Fall collection, and happily refined for Spring, was his pitch perfect colour palette and use of impeccably crafted luxe materials. Olive crocodile culottes? A suede prairie skirt in a buttery peacock blue and bottle green? A buttonless pine green leather coat? They were all utter perfection. As was Lemaire's plunge into graphic patterns this season, at times seemingly Aztec-inspired, such as his striking turquoise, cherry red and grass green printed pant and matching top.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Hermès

Creative director Christophe Lemaire paired a few styles that normally wouldn’t sit comfortably together in the same collection: his clothes looked crisp, yet relaxed, and casual, yet expensive, all at once. The ease came in the shapes. This is a designer whose roots in sportswear (at tennis-friendly label Lacoste) mean that he's not likely to over think silhouettes. He cut mid-calf skirts and trousers in a body-flattering line, while waists were cinched but never too tightly. Silk sleeves fluttered, and linen collars were stiffened with an air of regal grace. What the designer nailed previously in his Fall collection, and happily refined for Spring, was his pitch perfect colour palette and use of impeccably crafted luxe materials. Olive crocodile culottes? A suede prairie skirt in a buttery peacock blue and bottle green? A buttonless pine green leather coat? They were all utter perfection. As was Lemaire's plunge into graphic patterns this season, at times seemingly Aztec-inspired, such as his striking turquoise, cherry red and grass green printed pant and matching top.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Hermès

Creative director Christophe Lemaire paired a few styles that normally wouldn’t sit comfortably together in the same collection: his clothes looked crisp, yet relaxed, and casual, yet expensive, all at once. The ease came in the shapes. This is a designer whose roots in sportswear (at tennis-friendly label Lacoste) mean that he's not likely to over think silhouettes. He cut mid-calf skirts and trousers in a body-flattering line, while waists were cinched but never too tightly. Silk sleeves fluttered, and linen collars were stiffened with an air of regal grace. What the designer nailed previously in his Fall collection, and happily refined for Spring, was his pitch perfect colour palette and use of impeccably crafted luxe materials. Olive crocodile culottes? A suede prairie skirt in a buttery peacock blue and bottle green? A buttonless pine green leather coat? They were all utter perfection. As was Lemaire's plunge into graphic patterns this season, at times seemingly Aztec-inspired, such as his striking turquoise, cherry red and grass green printed pant and matching top.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: JJ Martin

Dries Van Noten

Belgian designer Dries Van Noten has kicked off Paris’ fiercely competitive sartorial circuit with a standout Spring offering that will certainly be hard to top. Set against a backdrop of zigzagging screens painted in gold, the collection unfolded to a moody solo specially scored and performed by Radiohead’s bass guitarist Colin Greenwood. Sleeveless tuxedo jackets, gold plisse skirts and numbers in gilded micro-beaded fold lace all made a worthy outing. Van Noten’s prints made a similar splash, with ensembles crafted in night-sky motifs and blood-red poppy florals. Accessories, too, were en pointe: sunglasses came oversized and rounded, à la John Lennon, and models donned chunky platform cork-soled shoes. Silks of all gauges, finishes and twills were used throughout, from organza to chiffon to plongée, while copious amounts of ruffles completed the picture. Most memorable was a heavy silk damask with a tulip motif reproduced from the archives of Paris’ Arts Decoratifs, where the designer is set to exhibit the results of his collaboration with the museum next February.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Writer: Jessica Klingelfuss


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