Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have honed their language and syntax for the modern man: lightweight, sleek and slim suits with razor sharp cuts and futuristic textile technology for the gentleman player who cuts through business like a knife. Now they have added to his wardrobe by building on past propositions in denim hybrids. The killer heat-bonded trench, sou'wester and safari-meets-army-inspired jacket were all delivered in denim, dyed indigo blue or navy, or awash with the camouflage print that Valentino has appropriated with true aplomb.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have honed their language and syntax for the modern man: lightweight, sleek and slim suits with razor sharp cuts and futuristic textile technology for the gentleman player who cuts through business like a knife. Now they have added to his wardrobe by building on past propositions in denim hybrids. The killer heat-bonded trench, sou'wester and safari-meets-army-inspired jacket were all delivered in denim, dyed indigo blue or navy, or awash with the camouflage print that Valentino has appropriated with true aplomb.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have honed their language and syntax for the modern man: lightweight, sleek and slim suits with razor sharp cuts and futuristic textile technology for the gentleman player who cuts through business like a knife. Now they have added to his wardrobe by building on past propositions in denim hybrids. The killer heat-bonded trench, sou'wester and safari-meets-army-inspired jacket were all delivered in denim, dyed indigo blue or navy, or awash with the camouflage print that Valentino has appropriated with true aplomb.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have honed their language and syntax for the modern man: lightweight, sleek and slim suits with razor sharp cuts and futuristic textile technology for the gentleman player who cuts through business like a knife. Now they have added to his wardrobe by building on past propositions in denim hybrids. The killer heat-bonded trench, sou'wester and safari-meets-army-inspired jacket were all delivered in denim, dyed indigo blue or navy, or awash with the camouflage print that Valentino has appropriated with true aplomb.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have honed their language and syntax for the modern man: lightweight, sleek and slim suits with razor sharp cuts and futuristic textile technology for the gentleman player who cuts through business like a knife. Now they have added to his wardrobe by building on past propositions in denim hybrids. The killer heat-bonded trench, sou'wester and safari-meets-army-inspired jacket were all delivered in denim, dyed indigo blue or navy, or awash with the camouflage print that Valentino has appropriated with true aplomb.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Haider Ackermann

The critical reception for the debut menswear collection of Haider Ackermann will doubtless be warm across the board, given how easily his taste for dressing women has translated to men. Haute bohemian meets the rockabilly and hard-edged Teddy boy in a confident symphony of high-end silk fabrics sculptured into low-slung, ankle-grazing yet slim-legged suits or multi-layered ensembles. Midnight blue, bruised plum, absinthe and smoked violets were the colours, while a smattering of polka dot scarves, single button suits and louche waistcoats or bomber jackets added panache to the Ackerman silhouette.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Haider Ackermann

The critical reception for the debut menswear collection of Haider Ackermann will doubtless be warm across the board, given how easily his taste for dressing women has translated to men. Haute bohemian meets the rockabilly and hard-edged Teddy boy in a confident symphony of high-end silk fabrics sculptured into low-slung, ankle-grazing yet slim-legged suits or multi-layered ensembles. Midnight blue, bruised plum, absinthe and smoked violets were the colours, while a smattering of polka dot scarves, single button suits and louche waistcoats or bomber jackets added panache to the Ackerman silhouette.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Haider Ackermann

The critical reception for the debut menswear collection of Haider Ackermann will doubtless be warm across the board, given how easily his taste for dressing women has translated to men. Haute bohemian meets the rockabilly and hard-edged Teddy boy in a confident symphony of high-end silk fabrics sculptured into low-slung, ankle-grazing yet slim-legged suits or multi-layered ensembles. Midnight blue, bruised plum, absinthe and smoked violets were the colours, while a smattering of polka dot scarves, single button suits and louche waistcoats or bomber jackets added panache to the Ackerman silhouette.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Haider Ackermann

The critical reception for the debut menswear collection of Haider Ackermann will doubtless be warm across the board, given how easily his taste for dressing women has translated to men. Haute bohemian meets the rockabilly and hard-edged Teddy boy in a confident symphony of high-end silk fabrics sculptured into low-slung, ankle-grazing yet slim-legged suits or multi-layered ensembles. Midnight blue, bruised plum, absinthe and smoked violets were the colours, while a smattering of polka dot scarves, single button suits and louche waistcoats or bomber jackets added panache to the Ackerman silhouette.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Haider Ackermann

The critical reception for the debut menswear collection of Haider Ackermann will doubtless be warm across the board, given how easily his taste for dressing women has translated to men. Haute bohemian meets the rockabilly and hard-edged Teddy boy in a confident symphony of high-end silk fabrics sculptured into low-slung, ankle-grazing yet slim-legged suits or multi-layered ensembles. Midnight blue, bruised plum, absinthe and smoked violets were the colours, while a smattering of polka dot scarves, single button suits and louche waistcoats or bomber jackets added panache to the Ackerman silhouette.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Raf Simons

Raf Simons invited guests to the Gagosian Gallery outside Paris, where he staged his show amid the works of Alexander Calder and Jean Prouvé. The designer himself delivered an exciting exhibit of colour, quirky innovation and verve to a birth-of-techno and house soundtrack. A selection of futuristic sneaker/sock hybrids were worn by men carrying pochettes emblazoned with the word 'yoga' or maxi t-shirts printed with Pop Art references that spoke of artificiality and sports. Raf Simons is held in high esteem by today's new generation of male hip-hop stars and Japanese menswear trainspotters who recognise something in his designs and anticipate discovering inspirational pieces in his shows. Their faith seems to be blowing wind into the designer's sails.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Raf Simons

Raf Simons invited guests to the Gagosian Gallery outside Paris, where he staged his show amid the works of Alexander Calder and Jean Prouvé. The designer himself delivered an exciting exhibit of colour, quirky innovation and verve to a birth-of-techno and house soundtrack. A selection of futuristic sneaker/sock hybrids were worn by men carrying pochettes emblazoned with the word 'yoga' or maxi t-shirts printed with Pop Art references that spoke of artificiality and sports. Raf Simons is held in high esteem by today's new generation of male hip-hop stars and Japanese menswear trainspotters who recognise something in his designs and anticipate discovering inspirational pieces in his shows. Their faith seems to be blowing wind into the designer's sails.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Raf Simons

Raf Simons invited guests to the Gagosian Gallery outside Paris, where he staged his show amid the works of Alexander Calder and Jean Prouvé. The designer himself delivered an exciting exhibit of colour, quirky innovation and verve to a birth-of-techno and house soundtrack. A selection of futuristic sneaker/sock hybrids were worn by men carrying pochettes emblazoned with the word 'yoga' or maxi t-shirts printed with Pop Art references that spoke of artificiality and sports. Raf Simons is held in high esteem by today's new generation of male hip-hop stars and Japanese menswear trainspotters who recognise something in his designs and anticipate discovering inspirational pieces in his shows. Their faith seems to be blowing wind into the designer's sails.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Raf Simons

Raf Simons invited guests to the Gagosian Gallery outside Paris, where he staged his show amid the works of Alexander Calder and Jean Prouvé. The designer himself delivered an exciting exhibit of colour, quirky innovation and verve to a birth-of-techno and house soundtrack. A selection of futuristic sneaker/sock hybrids were worn by men carrying pochettes emblazoned with the word 'yoga' or maxi t-shirts printed with Pop Art references that spoke of artificiality and sports. Raf Simons is held in high esteem by today's new generation of male hip-hop stars and Japanese menswear trainspotters who recognise something in his designs and anticipate discovering inspirational pieces in his shows. Their faith seems to be blowing wind into the designer's sails.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Raf Simons

Raf Simons invited guests to the Gagosian Gallery outside Paris, where he staged his show amid the works of Alexander Calder and Jean Prouvé. The designer himself delivered an exciting exhibit of colour, quirky innovation and verve to a birth-of-techno and house soundtrack. A selection of futuristic sneaker/sock hybrids were worn by men carrying pochettes emblazoned with the word 'yoga' or maxi t-shirts printed with Pop Art references that spoke of artificiality and sports. Raf Simons is held in high esteem by today's new generation of male hip-hop stars and Japanese menswear trainspotters who recognise something in his designs and anticipate discovering inspirational pieces in his shows. Their faith seems to be blowing wind into the designer's sails.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

After opening his show with an astonishing live performance by Estonian rock band Winny Puhh, Rick Owens went on to present one of his most exciting collections in a darkened grand salle inside Bercy stadium. It was quite a feat to take in all the detail, what with the models striding along with hard vigour on the wide walkway to the sound of thrashing guitars and pummelling drums. But Owens fans will be delighted with what the Californian-born designer, who has risen to a God-like status amongst his followers, proposed. All-black leather tunics with zips and skin-revealing laser-cut perforations were matched with custom-made white trainers. Lightweight jumpsuits, or onesies, are a developing trend on the runways so far, and Owens also proposed this for Spring. Leather basketball vest tops were key to the look, as were variations on bomber jackets, oversized jackets and baggy shorts. At Owens' house, hip hop fused seamlessly with Goth, for a real moment in menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

After opening his show with an astonishing live performance by Estonian rock band Winny Puhh, Rick Owens went on to present one of his most exciting collections in a darkened grand salle inside Bercy stadium. It was quite a feat to take in all the detail, what with the models striding along with hard vigour on the wide walkway to the sound of thrashing guitars and pummelling drums. But Owens fans will be delighted with what the Californian-born designer, who has risen to a God-like status amongst his followers, proposed. All-black leather tunics with zips and skin-revealing laser-cut perforations were matched with custom-made white trainers. Lightweight jumpsuits, or onesies, are a developing trend on the runways so far, and Owens also proposed this for Spring. Leather basketball vest tops were key to the look, as were variations on bomber jackets, oversized jackets and baggy shorts. At Owens' house, hip hop fused seamlessly with Goth, for a real moment in menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

After opening his show with an astonishing live performance by Estonian rock band Winny Puhh, Rick Owens went on to present one of his most exciting collections in a darkened grand salle inside Bercy stadium. It was quite a feat to take in all the detail, what with the models striding along with hard vigour on the wide walkway to the sound of thrashing guitars and pummelling drums. But Owens fans will be delighted with what the Californian-born designer, who has risen to a God-like status amongst his followers, proposed. All-black leather tunics with zips and skin-revealing laser-cut perforations were matched with custom-made white trainers. Lightweight jumpsuits, or onesies, are a developing trend on the runways so far, and Owens also proposed this for Spring. Leather basketball vest tops were key to the look, as were variations on bomber jackets, oversized jackets and baggy shorts. At Owens' house, hip hop fused seamlessly with Goth, for a real moment in menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

After opening his show with an astonishing live performance by Estonian rock band Winny Puhh, Rick Owens went on to present one of his most exciting collections in a darkened grand salle inside Bercy stadium. It was quite a feat to take in all the detail, what with the models striding along with hard vigour on the wide walkway to the sound of thrashing guitars and pummelling drums. But Owens fans will be delighted with what the Californian-born designer, who has risen to a God-like status amongst his followers, proposed. All-black leather tunics with zips and skin-revealing laser-cut perforations were matched with custom-made white trainers. Lightweight jumpsuits, or onesies, are a developing trend on the runways so far, and Owens also proposed this for Spring. Leather basketball vest tops were key to the look, as were variations on bomber jackets, oversized jackets and baggy shorts. At Owens' house, hip hop fused seamlessly with Goth, for a real moment in menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Rick Owens

After opening his show with an astonishing live performance by Estonian rock band Winny Puhh, Rick Owens went on to present one of his most exciting collections in a darkened grand salle inside Bercy stadium. It was quite a feat to take in all the detail, what with the models striding along with hard vigour on the wide walkway to the sound of thrashing guitars and pummelling drums. But Owens fans will be delighted with what the Californian-born designer, who has risen to a God-like status amongst his followers, proposed. All-black leather tunics with zips and skin-revealing laser-cut perforations were matched with custom-made white trainers. Lightweight jumpsuits, or onesies, are a developing trend on the runways so far, and Owens also proposed this for Spring. Leather basketball vest tops were key to the look, as were variations on bomber jackets, oversized jackets and baggy shorts. At Owens' house, hip hop fused seamlessly with Goth, for a real moment in menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

The theme of this season's collection was a road trip from the East to the West-coast of America, and it made for another hit show for Kim Jones, Louis Vuitton's menswear studio and style director. The ease of the American casual classic - plaid cotton shirts, bandana prints, boy-scout raincoats and 1950s-style jackets - was elevated to luxury with the Vuitton makeover, thanks to top range textiles and materials, and monograms and motifs sprinkled liberally (although not overly) throughout. 41 looks progressed throughout the show, to the clear appreciation of David Beckham who was sitting on the front row with LVMH scion Antoine Arnault. The footballer, who recently closed the professional chapter of his sporting career at Paris football club Paris Saint-Germain, has been dressed by Vuitton for almost all of his recent public appearances. A perfect fit for the brand, it's easy to imagine Beckham building an entire wardrobe from this collection, which closed with a series of slim-cut dinner suits fit for both day and formal evening events.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

The theme of this season's collection was a road trip from the East to the West-coast of America, and it made for another hit show for Kim Jones, Louis Vuitton's menswear studio and style director. The ease of the American casual classic - plaid cotton shirts, bandana prints, boy-scout raincoats and 1950s-style jackets - was elevated to luxury with the Vuitton makeover, thanks to top range textiles and materials, and monograms and motifs sprinkled liberally (although not overly) throughout. 41 looks progressed throughout the show, to the clear appreciation of David Beckham who was sitting on the front row with LVMH scion Antoine Arnault. The footballer, who recently closed the professional chapter of his sporting career at Paris football club Paris Saint-Germain, has been dressed by Vuitton for almost all of his recent public appearances. A perfect fit for the brand, it's easy to imagine Beckham building an entire wardrobe from this collection, which closed with a series of slim-cut dinner suits fit for both day and formal evening events.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

The theme of this season's collection was a road trip from the East to the West-coast of America, and it made for another hit show for Kim Jones, Louis Vuitton's menswear studio and style director. The ease of the American casual classic - plaid cotton shirts, bandana prints, boy-scout raincoats and 1950s-style jackets - was elevated to luxury with the Vuitton makeover, thanks to top range textiles and materials, and monograms and motifs sprinkled liberally (although not overly) throughout. 41 looks progressed throughout the show, to the clear appreciation of David Beckham who was sitting on the front row with LVMH scion Antoine Arnault. The footballer, who recently closed the professional chapter of his sporting career at Paris football club Paris Saint-Germain, has been dressed by Vuitton for almost all of his recent public appearances. A perfect fit for the brand, it's easy to imagine Beckham building an entire wardrobe from this collection, which closed with a series of slim-cut dinner suits fit for both day and formal evening events.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

The theme of this season's collection was a road trip from the East to the West-coast of America, and it made for another hit show for Kim Jones, Louis Vuitton's menswear studio and style director. The ease of the American casual classic - plaid cotton shirts, bandana prints, boy-scout raincoats and 1950s-style jackets - was elevated to luxury with the Vuitton makeover, thanks to top range textiles and materials, and monograms and motifs sprinkled liberally (although not overly) throughout. 41 looks progressed throughout the show, to the clear appreciation of David Beckham who was sitting on the front row with LVMH scion Antoine Arnault. The footballer, who recently closed the professional chapter of his sporting career at Paris football club Paris Saint-Germain, has been dressed by Vuitton for almost all of his recent public appearances. A perfect fit for the brand, it's easy to imagine Beckham building an entire wardrobe from this collection, which closed with a series of slim-cut dinner suits fit for both day and formal evening events.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Louis Vuitton

The theme of this season's collection was a road trip from the East to the West-coast of America, and it made for another hit show for Kim Jones, Louis Vuitton's menswear studio and style director. The ease of the American casual classic - plaid cotton shirts, bandana prints, boy-scout raincoats and 1950s-style jackets - was elevated to luxury with the Vuitton makeover, thanks to top range textiles and materials, and monograms and motifs sprinkled liberally (although not overly) throughout. 41 looks progressed throughout the show, to the clear appreciation of David Beckham who was sitting on the front row with LVMH scion Antoine Arnault. The footballer, who recently closed the professional chapter of his sporting career at Paris football club Paris Saint-Germain, has been dressed by Vuitton for almost all of his recent public appearances. A perfect fit for the brand, it's easy to imagine Beckham building an entire wardrobe from this collection, which closed with a series of slim-cut dinner suits fit for both day and formal evening events.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

Dries Van Noten used Hawaiian flowers and fauna, together with surf elements, to add colour and playfulness to his Spring collection. Very casual in spirit, the Dries man wore lightweight trenches over baggy shorts and vests marked with the number nine. A high-end take on tracksuit trousers was a highlight, with the trousers cut slim on the leg and tapered at the ankle. All of the materials, from sheer shirts to heavier embroidered peacoats, were covered in flowers that were dark and brooding with notes of blue and absinthe yellow. At the centre of the huge warehouse show space was a sole drummer, Cindy Blackman Santana (wife of Carlos Santana), who provided a crashing soundtrack on a set of silver drums, backlit with a shimmering wall of gold.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

Dries Van Noten used Hawaiian flowers and fauna, together with surf elements, to add colour and playfulness to his Spring collection. Very casual in spirit, the Dries man wore lightweight trenches over baggy shorts and vests marked with the number nine. A high-end take on tracksuit trousers was a highlight, with the trousers cut slim on the leg and tapered at the ankle. All of the materials, from sheer shirts to heavier embroidered peacoats, were covered in flowers that were dark and brooding with notes of blue and absinthe yellow. At the centre of the huge warehouse show space was a sole drummer, Cindy Blackman Santana (wife of Carlos Santana), who provided a crashing soundtrack on a set of silver drums, backlit with a shimmering wall of gold.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

Dries Van Noten used Hawaiian flowers and fauna, together with surf elements, to add colour and playfulness to his Spring collection. Very casual in spirit, the Dries man wore lightweight trenches over baggy shorts and vests marked with the number nine. A high-end take on tracksuit trousers was a highlight, with the trousers cut slim on the leg and tapered at the ankle. All of the materials, from sheer shirts to heavier embroidered peacoats, were covered in flowers that were dark and brooding with notes of blue and absinthe yellow. At the centre of the huge warehouse show space was a sole drummer, Cindy Blackman Santana (wife of Carlos Santana), who provided a crashing soundtrack on a set of silver drums, backlit with a shimmering wall of gold.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

Dries Van Noten used Hawaiian flowers and fauna, together with surf elements, to add colour and playfulness to his Spring collection. Very casual in spirit, the Dries man wore lightweight trenches over baggy shorts and vests marked with the number nine. A high-end take on tracksuit trousers was a highlight, with the trousers cut slim on the leg and tapered at the ankle. All of the materials, from sheer shirts to heavier embroidered peacoats, were covered in flowers that were dark and brooding with notes of blue and absinthe yellow. At the centre of the huge warehouse show space was a sole drummer, Cindy Blackman Santana (wife of Carlos Santana), who provided a crashing soundtrack on a set of silver drums, backlit with a shimmering wall of gold.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dries Van Noten

Dries Van Noten used Hawaiian flowers and fauna, together with surf elements, to add colour and playfulness to his Spring collection. Very casual in spirit, the Dries man wore lightweight trenches over baggy shorts and vests marked with the number nine. A high-end take on tracksuit trousers was a highlight, with the trousers cut slim on the leg and tapered at the ankle. All of the materials, from sheer shirts to heavier embroidered peacoats, were covered in flowers that were dark and brooding with notes of blue and absinthe yellow. At the centre of the huge warehouse show space was a sole drummer, Cindy Blackman Santana (wife of Carlos Santana), who provided a crashing soundtrack on a set of silver drums, backlit with a shimmering wall of gold.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

Hunting and fishing in the great outdoors was the theme at Junya Watanabe, executed with confidence as a joyful plethora of waxed jackets, fly-fishing body-warmers and boating jackets came down the runway. Models greeted each other as they crossed during their sporting weekend in the countryside, allowing time for the audience to take in the many details like zips, pocketing, knapsacks and prints. The colour palette was fresh, ranging from breezy pinks and sky blues to washed denim and tomato red. Hawaiian flower print, a clear trend in Paris this season, was present in a collection that has plenty to offer any man passionate about breathing in that fresh country air before heading back to the city on Monday.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

Hunting and fishing in the great outdoors was the theme at Junya Watanabe, executed with confidence as a joyful plethora of waxed jackets, fly-fishing body-warmers and boating jackets came down the runway. Models greeted each other as they crossed during their sporting weekend in the countryside, allowing time for the audience to take in the many details like zips, pocketing, knapsacks and prints. The colour palette was fresh, ranging from breezy pinks and sky blues to washed denim and tomato red. Hawaiian flower print, a clear trend in Paris this season, was present in a collection that has plenty to offer any man passionate about breathing in that fresh country air before heading back to the city on Monday.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

Hunting and fishing in the great outdoors was the theme at Junya Watanabe, executed with confidence as a joyful plethora of waxed jackets, fly-fishing body-warmers and boating jackets came down the runway. Models greeted each other as they crossed during their sporting weekend in the countryside, allowing time for the audience to take in the many details like zips, pocketing, knapsacks and prints. The colour palette was fresh, ranging from breezy pinks and sky blues to washed denim and tomato red. Hawaiian flower print, a clear trend in Paris this season, was present in a collection that has plenty to offer any man passionate about breathing in that fresh country air before heading back to the city on Monday.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

Hunting and fishing in the great outdoors was the theme at Junya Watanabe, executed with confidence as a joyful plethora of waxed jackets, fly-fishing body-warmers and boating jackets came down the runway. Models greeted each other as they crossed during their sporting weekend in the countryside, allowing time for the audience to take in the many details like zips, pocketing, knapsacks and prints. The colour palette was fresh, ranging from breezy pinks and sky blues to washed denim and tomato red. Hawaiian flower print, a clear trend in Paris this season, was present in a collection that has plenty to offer any man passionate about breathing in that fresh country air before heading back to the city on Monday.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Junya Watanabe

Hunting and fishing in the great outdoors was the theme at Junya Watanabe, executed with confidence as a joyful plethora of waxed jackets, fly-fishing body-warmers and boating jackets came down the runway. Models greeted each other as they crossed during their sporting weekend in the countryside, allowing time for the audience to take in the many details like zips, pocketing, knapsacks and prints. The colour palette was fresh, ranging from breezy pinks and sky blues to washed denim and tomato red. Hawaiian flower print, a clear trend in Paris this season, was present in a collection that has plenty to offer any man passionate about breathing in that fresh country air before heading back to the city on Monday.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

The Margiela studio used time and memory as its central themes, as if materials had aged while suspended or stored. Rust marks gently traced T-Shirt necklines while imprints of keys in leather were transformed into necklaces. Jackets were taken apart and rebuilt - sometimes with their seams brought to the fore and used as a feature. The idea of vintage versus brand new was explored by clothes that appeared to be both. Half-skirt or sheaths were hung over loose trousers and aged leather jeans in nearly every look. The overall effect - together with the fantastic casting of healthy, gently masculine models - made for a cool, classic Margiela collection.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

The Margiela studio used time and memory as its central themes, as if materials had aged while suspended or stored. Rust marks gently traced T-Shirt necklines while imprints of keys in leather were transformed into necklaces. Jackets were taken apart and rebuilt - sometimes with their seams brought to the fore and used as a feature. The idea of vintage versus brand new was explored by clothes that appeared to be both. Half-skirt or sheaths were hung over loose trousers and aged leather jeans in nearly every look. The overall effect - together with the fantastic casting of healthy, gently masculine models - made for a cool, classic Margiela collection.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

The Margiela studio used time and memory as its central themes, as if materials had aged while suspended or stored. Rust marks gently traced T-Shirt necklines while imprints of keys in leather were transformed into necklaces. Jackets were taken apart and rebuilt - sometimes with their seams brought to the fore and used as a feature. The idea of vintage versus brand new was explored by clothes that appeared to be both. Half-skirt or sheaths were hung over loose trousers and aged leather jeans in nearly every look. The overall effect - together with the fantastic casting of healthy, gently masculine models - made for a cool, classic Margiela collection.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

The Margiela studio used time and memory as its central themes, as if materials had aged while suspended or stored. Rust marks gently traced T-Shirt necklines while imprints of keys in leather were transformed into necklaces. Jackets were taken apart and rebuilt - sometimes with their seams brought to the fore and used as a feature. The idea of vintage versus brand new was explored by clothes that appeared to be both. Half-skirt or sheaths were hung over loose trousers and aged leather jeans in nearly every look. The overall effect - together with the fantastic casting of healthy, gently masculine models - made for a cool, classic Margiela collection.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Maison Martin Margiela

The Margiela studio used time and memory as its central themes, as if materials had aged while suspended or stored. Rust marks gently traced T-Shirt necklines while imprints of keys in leather were transformed into necklaces. Jackets were taken apart and rebuilt - sometimes with their seams brought to the fore and used as a feature. The idea of vintage versus brand new was explored by clothes that appeared to be both. Half-skirt or sheaths were hung over loose trousers and aged leather jeans in nearly every look. The overall effect - together with the fantastic casting of healthy, gently masculine models - made for a cool, classic Margiela collection.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

Speaking backstage, Kris Van Assche agreed to the suggestion that he was feeling happier and more confident. This showed in a collection that was one of the strongest he's designed in recent years. Along with Christophe Lémaire, this Belgian designer is one of the kings of mixing sporty elements with smart work wear. And this season he demonstrated exactly how it's done by taking apart elements of suits, windcheaters, trenches and three-piece combos and giving them new context in fresh pieces that contained a key element of one with the function of another. Today's Van Assche man, with his trim, button-down collars under colour-blocked crew necks, is thoroughly modern, with an eye for contemporary design. The first stand-alone store has opened in central Paris, a 70 sq m homage to concrete minimalism.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

Speaking backstage, Kris Van Assche agreed to the suggestion that he was feeling happier and more confident. This showed in a collection that was one of the strongest he's designed in recent years. Along with Christophe Lémaire, this Belgian designer is one of the kings of mixing sporty elements with smart work wear. And this season he demonstrated exactly how it's done by taking apart elements of suits, windcheaters, trenches and three-piece combos and giving them new context in fresh pieces that contained a key element of one with the function of another. Today's Van Assche man, with his trim, button-down collars under colour-blocked crew necks, is thoroughly modern, with an eye for contemporary design. The first stand-alone store has opened in central Paris, a 70 sq m homage to concrete minimalism.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

Speaking backstage, Kris Van Assche agreed to the suggestion that he was feeling happier and more confident. This showed in a collection that was one of the strongest he's designed in recent years. Along with Christophe Lémaire, this Belgian designer is one of the kings of mixing sporty elements with smart work wear. And this season he demonstrated exactly how it's done by taking apart elements of suits, windcheaters, trenches and three-piece combos and giving them new context in fresh pieces that contained a key element of one with the function of another. Today's Van Assche man, with his trim, button-down collars under colour-blocked crew necks, is thoroughly modern, with an eye for contemporary design. The first stand-alone store has opened in central Paris, a 70 sq m homage to concrete minimalism.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

Speaking backstage, Kris Van Assche agreed to the suggestion that he was feeling happier and more confident. This showed in a collection that was one of the strongest he's designed in recent years. Along with Christophe Lémaire, this Belgian designer is one of the kings of mixing sporty elements with smart work wear. And this season he demonstrated exactly how it's done by taking apart elements of suits, windcheaters, trenches and three-piece combos and giving them new context in fresh pieces that contained a key element of one with the function of another. Today's Van Assche man, with his trim, button-down collars under colour-blocked crew necks, is thoroughly modern, with an eye for contemporary design. The first stand-alone store has opened in central Paris, a 70 sq m homage to concrete minimalism.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kris Van Assche

Speaking backstage, Kris Van Assche agreed to the suggestion that he was feeling happier and more confident. This showed in a collection that was one of the strongest he's designed in recent years. Along with Christophe Lémaire, this Belgian designer is one of the kings of mixing sporty elements with smart work wear. And this season he demonstrated exactly how it's done by taking apart elements of suits, windcheaters, trenches and three-piece combos and giving them new context in fresh pieces that contained a key element of one with the function of another. Today's Van Assche man, with his trim, button-down collars under colour-blocked crew necks, is thoroughly modern, with an eye for contemporary design. The first stand-alone store has opened in central Paris, a 70 sq m homage to concrete minimalism.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Cerruti 1881

Now in his second season as creative director at Cerruti, Aldo Maria Camillo attracted a full house for his collection presention in the beautiful rose gardens of the French National Institute for Blind Children. With a selection of earth tones making up the collection's colour spectrum, smart business wear was the baseline from which Camillo crafted, pruned and honed to produce streamlined, unfussy suiting and tall silhouettes. The quality of woven materials was evident, the key cornerstone of Cerruti menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Cerruti 1881

Now in his second season as creative director at Cerruti, Aldo Maria Camillo attracted a full house for his collection presention in the beautiful rose gardens of the French National Institute for Blind Children. With a selection of earth tones making up the collection's colour spectrum, smart business wear was the baseline from which Camillo crafted, pruned and honed to produce streamlined, unfussy suiting and tall silhouettes. The quality of woven materials was evident, the key cornerstone of Cerruti menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Cerruti 1881

Now in his second season as creative director at Cerruti, Aldo Maria Camillo attracted a full house for his collection presention in the beautiful rose gardens of the French National Institute for Blind Children. With a selection of earth tones making up the collection's colour spectrum, smart business wear was the baseline from which Camillo crafted, pruned and honed to produce streamlined, unfussy suiting and tall silhouettes. The quality of woven materials was evident, the key cornerstone of Cerruti menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Cerruti 1881

Now in his second season as creative director at Cerruti, Aldo Maria Camillo attracted a full house for his collection presention in the beautiful rose gardens of the French National Institute for Blind Children. With a selection of earth tones making up the collection's colour spectrum, smart business wear was the baseline from which Camillo crafted, pruned and honed to produce streamlined, unfussy suiting and tall silhouettes. The quality of woven materials was evident, the key cornerstone of Cerruti menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Cerruti 1881

Now in his second season as creative director at Cerruti, Aldo Maria Camillo attracted a full house for his collection presention in the beautiful rose gardens of the French National Institute for Blind Children. With a selection of earth tones making up the collection's colour spectrum, smart business wear was the baseline from which Camillo crafted, pruned and honed to produce streamlined, unfussy suiting and tall silhouettes. The quality of woven materials was evident, the key cornerstone of Cerruti menswear.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

The Comme Des Garçons runway show was a play of many acts, but one thing that was firmly constant throughout was the soundtrack, ‘Open Eye Signal’ by techno producer, Jon Hopkins. Today’s collection felt to have a narrative, with the first section being all about black leather tunic tops and artfully-aged black suits; another section was like a hooligan’s bomb of bright flowers that covered ruched suits. Punk was an evident motif throughout, with buckles hanging off shoulders of suiting that was more for the fashion collector and dreamer than the everyday reality of life.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

The Comme Des Garçons runway show was a play of many acts, but one thing that was firmly constant throughout was the soundtrack, ‘Open Eye Signal’ by techno producer, Jon Hopkins. Today’s collection felt to have a narrative, with the first section being all about black leather tunic tops and artfully-aged black suits; another section was like a hooligan’s bomb of bright flowers that covered ruched suits. Punk was an evident motif throughout, with buckles hanging off shoulders of suiting that was more for the fashion collector and dreamer than the everyday reality of life.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

The Comme Des Garçons runway show was a play of many acts, but one thing that was firmly constant throughout was the soundtrack, ‘Open Eye Signal’ by techno producer, Jon Hopkins. Today’s collection felt to have a narrative, with the first section being all about black leather tunic tops and artfully-aged black suits; another section was like a hooligan’s bomb of bright flowers that covered ruched suits. Punk was an evident motif throughout, with buckles hanging off shoulders of suiting that was more for the fashion collector and dreamer than the everyday reality of life.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

The Comme Des Garçons runway show was a play of many acts, but one thing that was firmly constant throughout was the soundtrack, ‘Open Eye Signal’ by techno producer, Jon Hopkins. Today’s collection felt to have a narrative, with the first section being all about black leather tunic tops and artfully-aged black suits; another section was like a hooligan’s bomb of bright flowers that covered ruched suits. Punk was an evident motif throughout, with buckles hanging off shoulders of suiting that was more for the fashion collector and dreamer than the everyday reality of life.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Comme des Garçons

The Comme Des Garçons runway show was a play of many acts, but one thing that was firmly constant throughout was the soundtrack, ‘Open Eye Signal’ by techno producer, Jon Hopkins. Today’s collection felt to have a narrative, with the first section being all about black leather tunic tops and artfully-aged black suits; another section was like a hooligan’s bomb of bright flowers that covered ruched suits. Punk was an evident motif throughout, with buckles hanging off shoulders of suiting that was more for the fashion collector and dreamer than the everyday reality of life.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

High-end designers like Riccardo Tisci and Rick Owens have been engaging in a dialogue with street wear this season, creating some real flash points in fashion in the process. Givenchy wowed with a Spring collection that was fresh, unique and on point. Skin-tight leggings under baggy shorts is a touchstone look for Men's fashion at the moment, and Tisci pushed the look further by taking inspiration from an imagined road trip from LA to Africa. Masai and Zulu warriors were referenced, while strong primary colours were used with confidence, verve and vigour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

High-end designers like Riccardo Tisci and Rick Owens have been engaging in a dialogue with street wear this season, creating some real flash points in fashion in the process. Givenchy wowed with a Spring collection that was fresh, unique and on point. Skin-tight leggings under baggy shorts is a touchstone look for Men's fashion at the moment, and Tisci pushed the look further by taking inspiration from an imagined road trip from LA to Africa. Masai and Zulu warriors were referenced, while strong primary colours were used with confidence, verve and vigour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

High-end designers like Riccardo Tisci and Rick Owens have been engaging in a dialogue with street wear this season, creating some real flash points in fashion in the process. Givenchy wowed with a Spring collection that was fresh, unique and on point. Skin-tight leggings under baggy shorts is a touchstone look for Men's fashion at the moment, and Tisci pushed the look further by taking inspiration from an imagined road trip from LA to Africa. Masai and Zulu warriors were referenced, while strong primary colours were used with confidence, verve and vigour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

High-end designers like Riccardo Tisci and Rick Owens have been engaging in a dialogue with street wear this season, creating some real flash points in fashion in the process. Givenchy wowed with a Spring collection that was fresh, unique and on point. Skin-tight leggings under baggy shorts is a touchstone look for Men's fashion at the moment, and Tisci pushed the look further by taking inspiration from an imagined road trip from LA to Africa. Masai and Zulu warriors were referenced, while strong primary colours were used with confidence, verve and vigour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Givenchy

High-end designers like Riccardo Tisci and Rick Owens have been engaging in a dialogue with street wear this season, creating some real flash points in fashion in the process. Givenchy wowed with a Spring collection that was fresh, unique and on point. Skin-tight leggings under baggy shorts is a touchstone look for Men's fashion at the moment, and Tisci pushed the look further by taking inspiration from an imagined road trip from LA to Africa. Masai and Zulu warriors were referenced, while strong primary colours were used with confidence, verve and vigour.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Now well into its fourth season of rebirth with LVMH, Berluti continued to expand on the colours and wardrobe propositions that were set out in the shoemaker's first ready-to-wear collection back in 2012. This season artistic director Alessandro Sartori looked to the summer suit, notably a three-piece number. The famous Berluti brogues were present; this time a summery canvas version was added, paired with slim-cut trousers that rested just above the ankle. Straw hats, weekend holdalls, cardigans and safari jackets were also blended into the mix, in rich hues of Berluti plum, mustard and deep indigo blue 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Now well into its fourth season of rebirth with LVMH, Berluti continued to expand on the colours and wardrobe propositions that were set out in the shoemaker's first ready-to-wear collection back in 2012. This season artistic director Alessandro Sartori looked to the summer suit, notably a three-piece number. The famous Berluti brogues were present; this time a summery canvas version was added, paired with slim-cut trousers that rested just above the ankle. Straw hats, weekend holdalls, cardigans and safari jackets were also blended into the mix, in rich hues of Berluti plum, mustard and deep indigo blue 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Now well into its fourth season of rebirth with LVMH, Berluti continued to expand on the colours and wardrobe propositions that were set out in the shoemaker's first ready-to-wear collection back in 2012. This season artistic director Alessandro Sartori looked to the summer suit, notably a three-piece number. The famous Berluti brogues were present; this time a summery canvas version was added, paired with slim-cut trousers that rested just above the ankle. Straw hats, weekend holdalls, cardigans and safari jackets were also blended into the mix, in rich hues of Berluti plum, mustard and deep indigo blue 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Now well into its fourth season of rebirth with LVMH, Berluti continued to expand on the colours and wardrobe propositions that were set out in the shoemaker's first ready-to-wear collection back in 2012. This season artistic director Alessandro Sartori looked to the summer suit, notably a three-piece number. The famous Berluti brogues were present; this time a summery canvas version was added, paired with slim-cut trousers that rested just above the ankle. Straw hats, weekend holdalls, cardigans and safari jackets were also blended into the mix, in rich hues of Berluti plum, mustard and deep indigo blue 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Berluti

Now well into its fourth season of rebirth with LVMH, Berluti continued to expand on the colours and wardrobe propositions that were set out in the shoemaker's first ready-to-wear collection back in 2012. This season artistic director Alessandro Sartori looked to the summer suit, notably a three-piece number. The famous Berluti brogues were present; this time a summery canvas version was added, paired with slim-cut trousers that rested just above the ankle. Straw hats, weekend holdalls, cardigans and safari jackets were also blended into the mix, in rich hues of Berluti plum, mustard and deep indigo blue 

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Loewe

'Streamlined' and 'calm simplicity' were the key phrases to understanding the luxurious and casual menswear proposed for the Loewe customer for Spring. In a collection inspired by the Spanish resort of Sotogrande in Andalucia on the Spanish Riviera,  the likes of a sailor's mac and yachting anorak were the centrepieces, even more so when one learnt that the leather yachting jacket had undergone a modern tanning process that rendered the supple material water-proof. Lightweight leathers of the highest quality were perforated and used to make bags, belts and accessories, in colours that reflected Sotogrande's vividly coloured marina.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Loewe

'Streamlined' and 'calm simplicity' were the key phrases to understanding the luxurious and casual menswear proposed for the Loewe customer for Spring. In a collection inspired by the Spanish resort of Sotogrande in Andalucia on the Spanish Riviera,  the likes of a sailor's mac and yachting anorak were the centrepieces, even more so when one learnt that the leather yachting jacket had undergone a modern tanning process that rendered the supple material water-proof. Lightweight leathers of the highest quality were perforated and used to make bags, belts and accessories, in colours that reflected Sotogrande's vividly coloured marina.

Writer: Sarah Hay

Kenzo

California was clearly in the hearts and minds of Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who presented their new collection set to a soundtrack by Mike D from the Beastie Boys. A vast display of fresh fruit and juices greeted invitees at the entrance to the show, which the pair explained was a reference to one of the cornerstones of the Californian lifestyle. The sea, another distinct West Coast motif, was portrayed by a wave print repeated across sweatshirts, baggy shorts and trenches. The youthful attitude of the clothes took strong cues from skate and punk, which the design duo said was inspired by a time in Californian streetwear history, perhaps the late 80s, when men began adlibbing and mixing sartorial codes. It was a time when suits were first matched with Converse trainers and t-shirts paired with trousers initially fabricated to be worn in the office. This was the era when punk bands and ska fans began freestyling with dress codes and an enduring look was born, exemplified perfectly by gentlemen like Mike D and the Beastie Boys.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kenzo

California was clearly in the hearts and minds of Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who presented their new collection set to a soundtrack by Mike D from the Beastie Boys. A vast display of fresh fruit and juices greeted invitees at the entrance to the show, which the pair explained was a reference to one of the cornerstones of the Californian lifestyle. The sea, another distinct West Coast motif, was portrayed by a wave print repeated across sweatshirts, baggy shorts and trenches. The youthful attitude of the clothes took strong cues from skate and punk, which the design duo said was inspired by a time in Californian streetwear history, perhaps the late 80s, when men began adlibbing and mixing sartorial codes. It was a time when suits were first matched with Converse trainers and t-shirts paired with trousers initially fabricated to be worn in the office. This was the era when punk bands and ska fans began freestyling with dress codes and an enduring look was born, exemplified perfectly by gentlemen like Mike D and the Beastie Boys.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kenzo

California was clearly in the hearts and minds of Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who presented their new collection set to a soundtrack by Mike D from the Beastie Boys. A vast display of fresh fruit and juices greeted invitees at the entrance to the show, which the pair explained was a reference to one of the cornerstones of the Californian lifestyle. The sea, another distinct West Coast motif, was portrayed by a wave print repeated across sweatshirts, baggy shorts and trenches. The youthful attitude of the clothes took strong cues from skate and punk, which the design duo said was inspired by a time in Californian streetwear history, perhaps the late 80s, when men began adlibbing and mixing sartorial codes. It was a time when suits were first matched with Converse trainers and t-shirts paired with trousers initially fabricated to be worn in the office. This was the era when punk bands and ska fans began freestyling with dress codes and an enduring look was born, exemplified perfectly by gentlemen like Mike D and the Beastie Boys.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kenzo

California was clearly in the hearts and minds of Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who presented their new collection set to a soundtrack by Mike D from the Beastie Boys. A vast display of fresh fruit and juices greeted invitees at the entrance to the show, which the pair explained was a reference to one of the cornerstones of the Californian lifestyle. The sea, another distinct West Coast motif, was portrayed by a wave print repeated across sweatshirts, baggy shorts and trenches. The youthful attitude of the clothes took strong cues from skate and punk, which the design duo said was inspired by a time in Californian streetwear history, perhaps the late 80s, when men began adlibbing and mixing sartorial codes. It was a time when suits were first matched with Converse trainers and t-shirts paired with trousers initially fabricated to be worn in the office. This was the era when punk bands and ska fans began freestyling with dress codes and an enduring look was born, exemplified perfectly by gentlemen like Mike D and the Beastie Boys.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Kenzo

California was clearly in the hearts and minds of Carol Lim and Humberto Leon, who presented their new collection set to a soundtrack by Mike D from the Beastie Boys. A vast display of fresh fruit and juices greeted invitees at the entrance to the show, which the pair explained was a reference to one of the cornerstones of the Californian lifestyle. The sea, another distinct West Coast motif, was portrayed by a wave print repeated across sweatshirts, baggy shorts and trenches. The youthful attitude of the clothes took strong cues from skate and punk, which the design duo said was inspired by a time in Californian streetwear history, perhaps the late 80s, when men began adlibbing and mixing sartorial codes. It was a time when suits were first matched with Converse trainers and t-shirts paired with trousers initially fabricated to be worn in the office. This was the era when punk bands and ska fans began freestyling with dress codes and an enduring look was born, exemplified perfectly by gentlemen like Mike D and the Beastie Boys.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

The Dior man was reflected to infinity in a dazzling runway set made of mirrors. How the models managed to effortlessly navigate the mirrored labyrinth was a feat that certainly impressed the audience. Patchwork was a key theme to the collection, with Mondrian-like panels placed liberally across jackets and suits that came in either dark indigo blue or burgundy. The Dior man is understated - artistic director Kris Van Assche understands this and each season caters for clientele looking for smart workwear ready for Wall Street and beyond.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

The Dior man was reflected to infinity in a dazzling runway set made of mirrors. How the models managed to effortlessly navigate the mirrored labyrinth was a feat that certainly impressed the audience. Patchwork was a key theme to the collection, with Mondrian-like panels placed liberally across jackets and suits that came in either dark indigo blue or burgundy. The Dior man is understated - artistic director Kris Van Assche understands this and each season caters for clientele looking for smart workwear ready for Wall Street and beyond.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

The Dior man was reflected to infinity in a dazzling runway set made of mirrors. How the models managed to effortlessly navigate the mirrored labyrinth was a feat that certainly impressed the audience. Patchwork was a key theme to the collection, with Mondrian-like panels placed liberally across jackets and suits that came in either dark indigo blue or burgundy. The Dior man is understated - artistic director Kris Van Assche understands this and each season caters for clientele looking for smart workwear ready for Wall Street and beyond.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

The Dior man was reflected to infinity in a dazzling runway set made of mirrors. How the models managed to effortlessly navigate the mirrored labyrinth was a feat that certainly impressed the audience. Patchwork was a key theme to the collection, with Mondrian-like panels placed liberally across jackets and suits that came in either dark indigo blue or burgundy. The Dior man is understated - artistic director Kris Van Assche understands this and each season caters for clientele looking for smart workwear ready for Wall Street and beyond.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Dior Homme

The Dior man was reflected to infinity in a dazzling runway set made of mirrors. How the models managed to effortlessly navigate the mirrored labyrinth was a feat that certainly impressed the audience. Patchwork was a key theme to the collection, with Mondrian-like panels placed liberally across jackets and suits that came in either dark indigo blue or burgundy. The Dior man is understated - artistic director Kris Van Assche understands this and each season caters for clientele looking for smart workwear ready for Wall Street and beyond.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Menswear designer Veronique Nichanian celebrated 25 years at Hermès by sending nearly the same amount of looks down the runway in Paris. This season, Hermès menswear was all about relaxed masculinity in a collection entitled 'bohemian soul'. Nichanian delivered ultra-luxe materials in simple, classic lines and a serene palette of periwinkle, royal blue, stone and navy. From slim blazers to relaxed trousers to slick leather jackets, it is a versatile collection that will allow the wearer to inject his own personality into the clothes and gradually mould them into personal long-term wardrobe favourites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Menswear designer Veronique Nichanian celebrated 25 years at Hermès by sending nearly the same amount of looks down the runway in Paris. This season, Hermès menswear was all about relaxed masculinity in a collection entitled 'bohemian soul'. Nichanian delivered ultra-luxe materials in simple, classic lines and a serene palette of periwinkle, royal blue, stone and navy. From slim blazers to relaxed trousers to slick leather jackets, it is a versatile collection that will allow the wearer to inject his own personality into the clothes and gradually mould them into personal long-term wardrobe favourites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Menswear designer Veronique Nichanian celebrated 25 years at Hermès by sending nearly the same amount of looks down the runway in Paris. This season, Hermès menswear was all about relaxed masculinity in a collection entitled 'bohemian soul'. Nichanian delivered ultra-luxe materials in simple, classic lines and a serene palette of periwinkle, royal blue, stone and navy. From slim blazers to relaxed trousers to slick leather jackets, it is a versatile collection that will allow the wearer to inject his own personality into the clothes and gradually mould them into personal long-term wardrobe favourites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Menswear designer Veronique Nichanian celebrated 25 years at Hermès by sending nearly the same amount of looks down the runway in Paris. This season, Hermès menswear was all about relaxed masculinity in a collection entitled 'bohemian soul'. Nichanian delivered ultra-luxe materials in simple, classic lines and a serene palette of periwinkle, royal blue, stone and navy. From slim blazers to relaxed trousers to slick leather jackets, it is a versatile collection that will allow the wearer to inject his own personality into the clothes and gradually mould them into personal long-term wardrobe favourites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Hermès

Menswear designer Veronique Nichanian celebrated 25 years at Hermès by sending nearly the same amount of looks down the runway in Paris. This season, Hermès menswear was all about relaxed masculinity in a collection entitled 'bohemian soul'. Nichanian delivered ultra-luxe materials in simple, classic lines and a serene palette of periwinkle, royal blue, stone and navy. From slim blazers to relaxed trousers to slick leather jackets, it is a versatile collection that will allow the wearer to inject his own personality into the clothes and gradually mould them into personal long-term wardrobe favourites.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Lanvin

'Fashion has become so focused on how it looks on the screen, how it photographs, that we wanted to take away the screen and go back to real clothes and think about needs for men,' commented Lucas Ossendrijver directly after Lanvin's show, held in the elegant surroundings of Les Beaux Arts on a gloriously sunny day in Paris. The Lanvin suit came in many variations and differing proportions, from the oversized to the more clipped and fitted; sometimes with shorts or translated to an all-in-one boiler suit. Accessories, particularly bags, were also a focus, with the male bum bags kept close to the body and given a modern, utility-style redesign.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Lanvin

'Fashion has become so focused on how it looks on the screen, how it photographs, that we wanted to take away the screen and go back to real clothes and think about needs for men,' commented Lucas Ossendrijver directly after Lanvin's show, held in the elegant surroundings of Les Beaux Arts on a gloriously sunny day in Paris. The Lanvin suit came in many variations and differing proportions, from the oversized to the more clipped and fitted; sometimes with shorts or translated to an all-in-one boiler suit. Accessories, particularly bags, were also a focus, with the male bum bags kept close to the body and given a modern, utility-style redesign.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Lanvin

'Fashion has become so focused on how it looks on the screen, how it photographs, that we wanted to take away the screen and go back to real clothes and think about needs for men,' commented Lucas Ossendrijver directly after Lanvin's show, held in the elegant surroundings of Les Beaux Arts on a gloriously sunny day in Paris. The Lanvin suit came in many variations and differing proportions, from the oversized to the more clipped and fitted; sometimes with shorts or translated to an all-in-one boiler suit. Accessories, particularly bags, were also a focus, with the male bum bags kept close to the body and given a modern, utility-style redesign.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Lanvin

'Fashion has become so focused on how it looks on the screen, how it photographs, that we wanted to take away the screen and go back to real clothes and think about needs for men,' commented Lucas Ossendrijver directly after Lanvin's show, held in the elegant surroundings of Les Beaux Arts on a gloriously sunny day in Paris. The Lanvin suit came in many variations and differing proportions, from the oversized to the more clipped and fitted; sometimes with shorts or translated to an all-in-one boiler suit. Accessories, particularly bags, were also a focus, with the male bum bags kept close to the body and given a modern, utility-style redesign.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Lanvin

'Fashion has become so focused on how it looks on the screen, how it photographs, that we wanted to take away the screen and go back to real clothes and think about needs for men,' commented Lucas Ossendrijver directly after Lanvin's show, held in the elegant surroundings of Les Beaux Arts on a gloriously sunny day in Paris. The Lanvin suit came in many variations and differing proportions, from the oversized to the more clipped and fitted; sometimes with shorts or translated to an all-in-one boiler suit. Accessories, particularly bags, were also a focus, with the male bum bags kept close to the body and given a modern, utility-style redesign.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Paul Smith

'Don't put too much emphasis on the mushrooms,' joked Paul Smith about the motifs that kept making an appearance in his Spring collection. 'The point about the collection is texture and mixing performance fabrics with classical fabrics.' Smith's mushroom print, which appeared on shirts and T-Shirts, was inspired by his working with David Bowie again recently, evoking memories of wider trouser legs, pointed collars and the hippy side to the 1960s and 1970s. This was all transposed to suits and smart daywear - confident creative ground for the Paul Smith brand. Speaking of his label, Smith mused that he takes great inspiration from the fact that his multi-tasking customers conduct meetings, surf sidewalks and snowboard - sometimes all in one day - and need multi-functional fabrics and design that accommodates that.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Paul Smith

'Don't put too much emphasis on the mushrooms,' joked Paul Smith about the motifs that kept making an appearance in his Spring collection. 'The point about the collection is texture and mixing performance fabrics with classical fabrics.' Smith's mushroom print, which appeared on shirts and T-Shirts, was inspired by his working with David Bowie again recently, evoking memories of wider trouser legs, pointed collars and the hippy side to the 1960s and 1970s. This was all transposed to suits and smart daywear - confident creative ground for the Paul Smith brand. Speaking of his label, Smith mused that he takes great inspiration from the fact that his multi-tasking customers conduct meetings, surf sidewalks and snowboard - sometimes all in one day - and need multi-functional fabrics and design that accommodates that.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Paul Smith

'Don't put too much emphasis on the mushrooms,' joked Paul Smith about the motifs that kept making an appearance in his Spring collection. 'The point about the collection is texture and mixing performance fabrics with classical fabrics.' Smith's mushroom print, which appeared on shirts and T-Shirts, was inspired by his working with David Bowie again recently, evoking memories of wider trouser legs, pointed collars and the hippy side to the 1960s and 1970s. This was all transposed to suits and smart daywear - confident creative ground for the Paul Smith brand. Speaking of his label, Smith mused that he takes great inspiration from the fact that his multi-tasking customers conduct meetings, surf sidewalks and snowboard - sometimes all in one day - and need multi-functional fabrics and design that accommodates that.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Paul Smith

'Don't put too much emphasis on the mushrooms,' joked Paul Smith about the motifs that kept making an appearance in his Spring collection. 'The point about the collection is texture and mixing performance fabrics with classical fabrics.' Smith's mushroom print, which appeared on shirts and T-Shirts, was inspired by his working with David Bowie again recently, evoking memories of wider trouser legs, pointed collars and the hippy side to the 1960s and 1970s. This was all transposed to suits and smart daywear - confident creative ground for the Paul Smith brand. Speaking of his label, Smith mused that he takes great inspiration from the fact that his multi-tasking customers conduct meetings, surf sidewalks and snowboard - sometimes all in one day - and need multi-functional fabrics and design that accommodates that.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Paul Smith

'Don't put too much emphasis on the mushrooms,' joked Paul Smith about the motifs that kept making an appearance in his Spring collection. 'The point about the collection is texture and mixing performance fabrics with classical fabrics.' Smith's mushroom print, which appeared on shirts and T-Shirts, was inspired by his working with David Bowie again recently, evoking memories of wider trouser legs, pointed collars and the hippy side to the 1960s and 1970s. This was all transposed to suits and smart daywear - confident creative ground for the Paul Smith brand. Speaking of his label, Smith mused that he takes great inspiration from the fact that his multi-tasking customers conduct meetings, surf sidewalks and snowboard - sometimes all in one day - and need multi-functional fabrics and design that accommodates that.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Thom Browne

Thom Browne always seeks to shock with his presentations, but today he presented a collection that seemed to portray a more personal relationship with the one classic in menswear that he has redesigned, the Suit. Young male models stomped around in theatrical military garb, wearing uncomfortable block heels, their lower bodies restricted with giant straps, their identities hidden behind dark aviator glasses. The entire show was conducted with a level of over-the-top pomp and ceremony that reached the ridiculous - but it felt as if we were looking inside the mind of a man who sees the suit as a metaphor for power, humiliation, game-playing and uptight traditions that he finds a little ludicrous. In the pursuit of money, the suited man has both suffered and been the protagonist of all of these things. That today's costumed presentation will not reach the stores almost doesn't matter, because Browne's pursuit and oeuvre is the suit, which is what the flow of his customers look to buy regardless of seasonal trends.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Thom Browne

Thom Browne always seeks to shock with his presentations, but today he presented a collection that seemed to portray a more personal relationship with the one classic in menswear that he has redesigned, the Suit. Young male models stomped around in theatrical military garb, wearing uncomfortable block heels, their lower bodies restricted with giant straps, their identities hidden behind dark aviator glasses. The entire show was conducted with a level of over-the-top pomp and ceremony that reached the ridiculous - but it felt as if we were looking inside the mind of a man who sees the suit as a metaphor for power, humiliation, game-playing and uptight traditions that he finds a little ludicrous. In the pursuit of money, the suited man has both suffered and been the protagonist of all of these things. That today's costumed presentation will not reach the stores almost doesn't matter, because Browne's pursuit and oeuvre is the suit, which is what the flow of his customers look to buy regardless of seasonal trends.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Thom Browne

Thom Browne always seeks to shock with his presentations, but today he presented a collection that seemed to portray a more personal relationship with the one classic in menswear that he has redesigned, the Suit. Young male models stomped around in theatrical military garb, wearing uncomfortable block heels, their lower bodies restricted with giant straps, their identities hidden behind dark aviator glasses. The entire show was conducted with a level of over-the-top pomp and ceremony that reached the ridiculous - but it felt as if we were looking inside the mind of a man who sees the suit as a metaphor for power, humiliation, game-playing and uptight traditions that he finds a little ludicrous. In the pursuit of money, the suited man has both suffered and been the protagonist of all of these things. That today's costumed presentation will not reach the stores almost doesn't matter, because Browne's pursuit and oeuvre is the suit, which is what the flow of his customers look to buy regardless of seasonal trends.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Thom Browne

Thom Browne always seeks to shock with his presentations, but today he presented a collection that seemed to portray a more personal relationship with the one classic in menswear that he has redesigned, the Suit. Young male models stomped around in theatrical military garb, wearing uncomfortable block heels, their lower bodies restricted with giant straps, their identities hidden behind dark aviator glasses. The entire show was conducted with a level of over-the-top pomp and ceremony that reached the ridiculous - but it felt as if we were looking inside the mind of a man who sees the suit as a metaphor for power, humiliation, game-playing and uptight traditions that he finds a little ludicrous. In the pursuit of money, the suited man has both suffered and been the protagonist of all of these things. That today's costumed presentation will not reach the stores almost doesn't matter, because Browne's pursuit and oeuvre is the suit, which is what the flow of his customers look to buy regardless of seasonal trends.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Thom Browne

Thom Browne always seeks to shock with his presentations, but today he presented a collection that seemed to portray a more personal relationship with the one classic in menswear that he has redesigned, the Suit. Young male models stomped around in theatrical military garb, wearing uncomfortable block heels, their lower bodies restricted with giant straps, their identities hidden behind dark aviator glasses. The entire show was conducted with a level of over-the-top pomp and ceremony that reached the ridiculous - but it felt as if we were looking inside the mind of a man who sees the suit as a metaphor for power, humiliation, game-playing and uptight traditions that he finds a little ludicrous. In the pursuit of money, the suited man has both suffered and been the protagonist of all of these things. That today's costumed presentation will not reach the stores almost doesn't matter, because Browne's pursuit and oeuvre is the suit, which is what the flow of his customers look to buy regardless of seasonal trends.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent 

Hedi Slimane was relaxed after his runway show tonight. Tucked away in a dark corner backstage he chatted with the members of the bands Phoenix, Beck and Soko, all the while giving equal time to past collaborators, kids from bands who walked the show, editors from his favourite magazines and music producers. Saint Laurent under the creative direction of Slimane is a whole new world now. It is a rock 'n' roll ecosystem populated with musicians and creatives, existing in darker corners of Los Angeles - be it under moonlight at the Chateau Marmont or the sleazier bars on the strips. This lifestyle is reflected by the clothes on the runway; they speak of touring, rehearsing, of being scuffed up, but the clothes themselves, of course, are cut from luxury fabrics. If everything on the runway looks familiar, a fantastic evocation of dandy musicians in bands wearing black leather biker jackets cutting through the night, it's because it's supposed to. Going by the constant flow of customers into the stunning, newly redesigned Saint Laurent stores, Slimane's vision of his world is selling - selling very well in fact.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent 

Hedi Slimane was relaxed after his runway show tonight. Tucked away in a dark corner backstage he chatted with the members of the bands Phoenix, Beck and Soko, all the while giving equal time to past collaborators, kids from bands who walked the show, editors from his favourite magazines and music producers. Saint Laurent under the creative direction of Slimane is a whole new world now. It is a rock 'n' roll ecosystem populated with musicians and creatives, existing in darker corners of Los Angeles - be it under moonlight at the Chateau Marmont or the sleazier bars on the strips. This lifestyle is reflected by the clothes on the runway; they speak of touring, rehearsing, of being scuffed up, but the clothes themselves, of course, are cut from luxury fabrics. If everything on the runway looks familiar, a fantastic evocation of dandy musicians in bands wearing black leather biker jackets cutting through the night, it's because it's supposed to. Going by the constant flow of customers into the stunning, newly redesigned Saint Laurent stores, Slimane's vision of his world is selling - selling very well in fact.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent 

Hedi Slimane was relaxed after his runway show tonight. Tucked away in a dark corner backstage he chatted with the members of the bands Phoenix, Beck and Soko, all the while giving equal time to past collaborators, kids from bands who walked the show, editors from his favourite magazines and music producers. Saint Laurent under the creative direction of Slimane is a whole new world now. It is a rock 'n' roll ecosystem populated with musicians and creatives, existing in darker corners of Los Angeles - be it under moonlight at the Chateau Marmont or the sleazier bars on the strips. This lifestyle is reflected by the clothes on the runway; they speak of touring, rehearsing, of being scuffed up, but the clothes themselves, of course, are cut from luxury fabrics. If everything on the runway looks familiar, a fantastic evocation of dandy musicians in bands wearing black leather biker jackets cutting through the night, it's because it's supposed to. Going by the constant flow of customers into the stunning, newly redesigned Saint Laurent stores, Slimane's vision of his world is selling - selling very well in fact.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent 

Hedi Slimane was relaxed after his runway show tonight. Tucked away in a dark corner backstage he chatted with the members of the bands Phoenix, Beck and Soko, all the while giving equal time to past collaborators, kids from bands who walked the show, editors from his favourite magazines and music producers. Saint Laurent under the creative direction of Slimane is a whole new world now. It is a rock 'n' roll ecosystem populated with musicians and creatives, existing in darker corners of Los Angeles - be it under moonlight at the Chateau Marmont or the sleazier bars on the strips. This lifestyle is reflected by the clothes on the runway; they speak of touring, rehearsing, of being scuffed up, but the clothes themselves, of course, are cut from luxury fabrics. If everything on the runway looks familiar, a fantastic evocation of dandy musicians in bands wearing black leather biker jackets cutting through the night, it's because it's supposed to. Going by the constant flow of customers into the stunning, newly redesigned Saint Laurent stores, Slimane's vision of his world is selling - selling very well in fact.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Saint Laurent 

Hedi Slimane was relaxed after his runway show tonight. Tucked away in a dark corner backstage he chatted with the members of the bands Phoenix, Beck and Soko, all the while giving equal time to past collaborators, kids from bands who walked the show, editors from his favourite magazines and music producers. Saint Laurent under the creative direction of Slimane is a whole new world now. It is a rock 'n' roll ecosystem populated with musicians and creatives, existing in darker corners of Los Angeles - be it under moonlight at the Chateau Marmont or the sleazier bars on the strips. This lifestyle is reflected by the clothes on the runway; they speak of touring, rehearsing, of being scuffed up, but the clothes themselves, of course, are cut from luxury fabrics. If everything on the runway looks familiar, a fantastic evocation of dandy musicians in bands wearing black leather biker jackets cutting through the night, it's because it's supposed to. Going by the constant flow of customers into the stunning, newly redesigned Saint Laurent stores, Slimane's vision of his world is selling - selling very well in fact.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay

Valentino

Designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli have honed their language and syntax for the modern man: lightweight, sleek and slim suits with razor sharp cuts and futuristic textile technology for the gentleman player who cuts through business like a knife. Now they have added to his wardrobe by building on past propositions in denim hybrids. The killer heat-bonded trench, sou'wester and safari-meets-army-inspired jacket were all delivered in denim, dyed indigo blue or navy, or awash with the camouflage print that Valentino has appropriated with true aplomb.

Photography: Jason Lloyd Evans; Writer: Sarah Hay


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