Amid the rural village homes lining the streets of Orgères, France, there’s a conspicuous new kid on the block: a bright white, angular home made entirely of re-purposed shipping containers.

This new family home, dubbed the ‘Flying Box’, is the result of architect Josué Gillet’s pragmatic design approach. Gillet and his team at 2A Design were faced with a 160 sq m plot of sloping land and an equally small budget to boot. His solution came in the form of French company B3 Ecodesign’s recycling concept, which uses old shipping containers for modular housing purposes. 

'The house has been prefabricated in a factory, then moved on the site and achieved in approximately three months,' Gillet explains. 'The container dimensions fit exactly with the build-able zone of the plot.'

The home is made up of three distinct layers, each one measuring 100 sq m – but not all of this is interior space. The ground level is split into an open-air parking space and utility rooms, which form the base of the home, built into the slope.

An open-plan living area takes up the bulk of the middle layer, separated from the two bedrooms at the front by a lengthy kitchen island. Floor-to-ceiling windows and glass doors line the front and rear, allowing for natural light from the street-side in the bedrooms, and a living area extension into the private back garden.

Gillet sliced into the top layer of the Flying Box, mimicking the slope of the hill on which it sits, creating the fun angular façade that sets it apart from its neighbours. The resulting narrow master bedroom opens out onto a landscaped terrace.

'From there, you can enjoy a view from the village to the natural landscape of the country,' says Gillet. 'Giving back the roof of the villa to its inhabitants is the only way to propose large outdoor spaces on so small [a] plot.'