Prolific London design duo Patternity has teamed up with print company Moo on a series of ‘postcards with a purpose’. Designed to tempt people offline, and back into the world of paper-and-pen messages, the project aims to ‘form positive patterns of thinking and behaviour that ripple out into the world.’

‘The postcards invite people to slow down, and create moments of reflection that help to break the busy autopilot mode that we so often live in,’ Patternity founders Anna Murray and Grace Winteringham explain. ‘Encouraging people to in-build habits of gratitude in order to live life more fully is our key mission, and this new collaboration celebrates that.’

Not only does the project hope to coerce us away from our keyboards and into the stationery drawer, but the postcard’s patterns have been developed to promote ‘mindfulness’, giving us cause for pause. ‘The combination of thoughtful colours (that evoke compassion, generosity and love) with the joyful nature of playful patterns, inspires people to momentarily stop, reflect and truly appreciate someone or something.’

Patternity and Moo Postcards for mindfulness

The patterns used are ones that Murray and Winteringham have enjoyed most over the years – ‘graphic interpretations of everyday things that so often go unnoticed’ – including a flowing water pattern, ritual-esque stripes inspired by a fleeting shadow cast momentarily on the floor, and large circles based on the symbol of wholeness and unity of life.

The ability of interior architecture, art and furniture design to improve wellbeing is a hot topic at the moment. But can something as simple as a repeated decorative motif really make us feel better? Patternity has based its ‘conscious design’ philosophy on it, so looks to the history of natural design for proof. ‘Fundamental shapes and textures make up life here on planet earth. Whether you look through a telescope or a microscope life is made of repeating patterns. It’s a wonderful and curious thing! Patterns can remind us that we are part of a beautiful web. Remembering this can inspire us to be more mindful of our own habits – an uplifting thought amid the complex, individualised culture we often find ourselves in.’ Pattern has power – psst, pass it on. §