Mood board: The collection looked to the Arctic as a place being destroyed but is itself totally unforgiving. The clothes explored the need for extreme protection but with a street sensitivity. Elongated degrade cable-knit jumpers were worn over ski-pants with balaclavas. Contrasting layers of different proportions were key too; a cyan puffa was worn under a technical blazer and check ski jacket. Both the invitation and show notes were screen printed onto a sheet of multi-purpose insulation, made using recycled fabrics and yarns from previous seasons. The label is partnering with Earth Guardians in the autumn to create products that will further push their message of sustainability.

Scene setting: Carol Lim and Humberto Leon brought the backstage centre stage. A huge hanger space at the The Parc de la Villette was kitted out with brightly lit hair and make-up stations that weren’t just for display. Throughout, production staff milled around rails of clothes and make-up artists misted the skin of models as they stood in line, ready to walk. The show was back to front. Suspended above the space was the artist and long-time friend of the brand Devonté Hynes who played an exclusive mix at the piano.

Sound bite: The show combined both the men’s and the women’s collections, reflecting current notions of gender identity and fluidity. ‘At Kenzo, they have always been friends, sisters and brothers, husband and wife so it was natural to do a dual gender show. The two collections follow a similar story of considering where we are today,’ Leon said. ‘We always try to use our platform to ask questions about topics that we care about.’

RELATED TOPICS: KENZO