Cambridge family home features private garden spa annex

Sun Slice House, designed by London architect Neil Dusheiko, is a relaxing suburban retreat

Garden spa annex
(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Located in South Cambridge, this subtle yet luxurious home – the renovation and extension of an existing Victorian semi-detatched property – is the brainchild of London architect Neil Dusheiko. The project, named Sun Slice House, was conceived around a meticulously designed extension and includes the expanded living spaces, but also adds a rich garden and a chic private spa in a separate building within it. 

The clients spend a considerable amount of time at their residence, as both adults work there permanently and their three children are home-schooled. It's a set up that works particularly well in these pandemic times, when more and more of us seek designs that encourage home-working arrangements. 

‘We wanted the extension to feel like it was enveloping the existing home, creating a new layer around the older shell of the house so that they would read together,' says Dusheiko. ‘We also wanted to design the house from the inside out, where the form of the extension would be created by a combination of the solving environmental issues [solar and thermal] as well as dealing with the practicalities of everyday life from parents who work from home to home-schooling children.'

Sun Slice House rear view

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

With that in mind, the architects worked closely with their clients to determine the best spatial expression for their needs. Creating a dedicated area for leisure and exercise was key, for example. Dusheiko and his team obliged and drafted a lush, green garden for ample outdoors space (featuring work by landscape designer Jane Brockbank), and created a brand new outbuilding at the back, to house a gym, sauna and spa area.

The minimalist spa annex acts as a ‘retreat' for the parents and offers a much needed breakout area when needed. Meanwhile, a large, open plan family room in the main house is a light-filled flexible space spanning sitting, dinning and kitchen. Timber and neutral colours create a calming and easily adaptable environment. Skylights and expansive glazing bathe the interiors in natural light. 

The rear extension features slim, yellow hued, handcrafted Petersen Kolumba bricks, which lend texture and natural tone to the new structure, helping it blend harmoniously with the more natural surroundings of the garden.

Sun Slice House kitchen dinning

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House kitchen

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House kitchen island looking out

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House dinning

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House children's studies

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House staircase

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House kitchen detail

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House living space detail

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House bedrooms

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House storage

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House study

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House aerial garden spa

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House garden spa

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House garden spa interior

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House sauna

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

Sun Slice House garden spa looking out

(Image credit: Edmund Sumner)

INFORMATION

neildusheiko.com (opens in new tab)

Ellie Stathaki is the Architecture Editor at Wallpaper*. She trained as an architect at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece and studied architectural history at the Bartlett in London. Now an established journalist, she has been a member of the Wallpaper* team since 2006, visiting buildings across the globe and interviewing leading architects such as Tadao Ando and Rem Koolhaas. Ellie has also taken part in judging panels, moderated events, curated shows and contributed in books, such as The Contemporary House (Thames & Hudson, 2018) and Glenn Sestig Architecture Diary (2020).

With contributions from