Scene setting: It was a sunny Parisian morning when we made our way into the UN building in the Rive Gauche at 9.30am – only to be left in the absolute again. The Loewe set was a pitch-black room where all we could see were illuminated bunches of decadent, at times almost obscene looking, flowers, scattered here and there, as well as vintage portraits of indigenous tribes. Ushers with flashlights tried to help guests find their seats and there was a general moment of disorientation as nobody could quite see the person sitting next to them. Then suddenly all the lights went up at once to the rhythm of hot 1950s jazz (the soundtrack was masterfully provided by, who else, Michel Gaubert).

Mood board: One of the strongest points Jonathan Anderson has, particularly considering his role at a seasoned house like Loewe, is the fact that he is not trying to appear hip and young. He knows his client is a grown-up, mature woman and designs accordingly. Yesterday was no exception: the midi dresses meant to stand up on their own, the leather jackets and the leather godets skirts weren’t destined for Snapchat stars and It Girls. It made even more sense given the perverse, Tennessee Williams-esque atmosphere of the whole show. In seeing the dresses mixing Lurex, jersey and white poplin walk down the runway to lurid sax music, one had almost the impression of being in the presence of Katharine Hepburn's character in Suddenly Last Summer. It was surprising and it was unique. But then again, that's Anderson’s specialty.

Finishing touches: The collection was lighter on the accessories than seasons past, but there still were some standout pieces bound to become bestsellers in the hands of fashion-obsessed people around the globe. Namely, the white tote bags and big floppy white hats printed with cartoonish loaves of bread containing the Loewe logo in different colours

RELATED TOPICS: LOEWE