Luminaries: Rockwell Group and Rich Brilliant Willing team up on a new lighting collection

Left: the 'Notch' sconce light. Right: the spherical 'Phase' sconce
Rockwell Group and Rich Brilliant Willing, who’ve collaborated on customised lighting designs for several years now, present a collection comprised of three adaptable styles that riff on simple geometry. Pictured left: the 'Notch' sconce light. Right: the spherical 'Phase' sconce
(Image credit: Brian W Ferry)

When Rockwell Group and Rich Brilliant Willing unveiled their lighting collaboration during ICFF earlier this year, the fruits of their collective labours couldn’t be sweeter. A natural next step for the two New York firms, who’ve collaborated on customised lighting designs for several years now, the collection is comprised of three adaptable styles that riff on simple geometry.

The joint effort largely focuses on placing spherical bulbs within a cuboid framework and fuses together both firms’ eloquent design language with Rich Brilliant Willing’s flair for LED technology and manufacturing. The 'Witt', a modular spin on the traditional chandelier, pairs pearl-like bulbs with hollow brass cubes and can hang horizontally or vertically. Hung in a cluster or at staggered heights, this piece easily creates a different atmosphere, depending on its configuration. Invisible suspension cables further retain an air of mystique.

In contrast, the 'Phase' – a cast glass spherical sconce, half-covered by chrome – mimics the Moon half-lit. Wall-mounted, the design can be installed with the exposed half facing upwards for a brighter effect, or downwards for added drama. Even switched off, it emanates a quiet, sculptural aura, making it a charismatic addition to most rooms, despite its unobtrusive size.

The range is rounded out by the 'Notch', a rectangular, column-like shade that emits light from its top, bottom and core. Minimalist in shape, yet a bright lightsource thanks to several LEDs that reflect off the internal hollow of the piece, the simple design seductively adds depth to the rest of the room with just the flick of a switch.

'Notch' is a rectangular, column-like shade that emits light from its top, bottom and core. Minimalist in shape, the simple design seductively adds depth to the rest of the room

'Notch' is a rectangular, column-like shade that emits light from its top, bottom and core. Minimalist in shape, the simple design seductively adds depth to the rest of the room

(Image credit: Brian W Ferry)

'Phase' – a cast glass spherical sconce, half-covered by chrome – mimics the Moon half-lit. Wall-mounted, the design can be installed with the exposed half facing upwards for a brighter effect, or downwards for added drama

'Phase' – a cast glass spherical sconce, half-covered by chrome – mimics the Moon half-lit. Wall-mounted, the design can be installed with the exposed half facing upwards for a brighter effect, or downwards for added drama

(Image credit: Brian W Ferry)

The 'Witt', a modular spin on the traditional chandelier, pairs pearl-like bulbs with hollow brass cubes and can hang horizontally or vertically. Pictured left: 'Witt 3'. Right: 'Witt 4'

The 'Witt', a modular spin on the traditional chandelier, pairs pearl-like bulbs with hollow brass cubes and can hang horizontally or vertically. Pictured left: 'Witt 3'. Right: 'Witt 4'

(Image credit: Brian W Ferry)

Hung in a cluster or at staggered heights, this piece easily creates a different atmosphere, depending on its configuration. Invisible suspension cables further retain an air of mystique. Pictured: 'Witt 3'

Hung in a cluster or at staggered heights, this piece easily creates a different atmosphere, depending on its configuration. Invisible suspension cables further retain an air of mystique. Pictured: 'Witt 3'

(Image credit: Brian W Ferry)

Light featuring a globe inside a hollow metal cube

Hung in a cluster or at staggered heights, this piece easily creates a different atmosphere, depending on its configuration. Invisible suspension cables further retain an air of mystique. Pictured: 'Witt 3'

(Image credit: Brian W Ferry)

INFORMATION

For more information, visit the Rockwell Group website (opens in new tab)

Photography: Brian W Ferry

Pei-Ru Keh is the US Editor at Wallpaper*. Born and raised in Singapore, she has been a New Yorker since 2013. Pei-Ru has held various titles at Wallpaper* since she joined in 2007. She currently reports on design, art, architecture, fashion, beauty and lifestyle happenings in the United States, both in print and digitally. Pei-Ru has taken a key role in championing diversity and representation within Wallpaper's content pillars and actively seeks out stories that reflect a wide range of perspectives. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two children, and is currently learning how to drive.