John Hogan’s glass experiments present light in solid form

The Future Perfect presents ‘Ultraviolet’, an exhibition of new glass works by John Hogan (on view in San Francisco through July 2021) exploring UV light through a series of sculptural forms

Two triangular shaped glass objects by John Hogan, reflecting light in pink and blue
‘Double Denim’ by John Hogan is part of the American glass designer's new exhibition, ‘Ultraviolet’, on show at The Future Perfect in San Francisco through July 2021
(Image credit: TBC)

John Hogan unveils his latest glass designs; presented through a new show titled ‘Ultraviolet’ at The Future Perfect in San Francisco (through July 2021), the series explores light in sculptural form. ‘Light is a proactive and integral component of my sculptural practice,’ explains Seattle-based Hogan, whose output is based on abstract sculptural glass objects and lighting design (opens in new tab). ‘My passion is glass making and through glass I have become obsessed with light. For this body of work, I wanted to ask myself: how can light be complicated, interrogated and contextualised as a medium?’

Hogan’s creative process explored different types of light; not just visible light, but also light as invisible substance, as radioactivity. ‘UV light (specifically, UV‑B) causes the body to produce vitamin D, which is essential for life. Humans need some UV radiation to maintain adequate levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D in turn promotes healthy levels of serotonin. I like to think we aren’t entirely dissimilar from plants in this way. We thrive through our own type of photosynthesis,’ he explains. 

Two glass objects by John Hogan: left, a semi-circular clear sculpture with a blue edge, right, a green-tinted parallelepiped with a curved side

Left, ‘Concave with Blue’. Right, ‘Span’, both by John Hogan and part of the ‘Ultraviolet’ collection

(Image credit: TBC)

For the first time, Hogan worked with uranium glass, typically known for its glow-in-the-dark properties. Through a series of abstract and geometric shapes, the designer created an eclectic panorama of colourful glass objects that demonstrate the many ways light, shape and colour interact.

The pieces are displayed at the gallery and through a series of images Hogan created in collaboration with photographer Amanda Ringstad. The experimental photographs were created using multiple exposures and dramatic backdrops to add a new layer to the concept. 

The new body of work is intended as the manifestation of the variations in ultraviolet light, exploring spectrums of colour as well as harm, as the light is seen as both essential and harmful to human life. ‘Its purpose is to make the invisible visible: this work is meant to change shape with the light.’

Colourful glass objects on white plinths

Installation view of ‘Ultraviolet’.

(Image credit: Daniel Villarreal)

Two triangular shaped glass objects by John Hogan, reflecting light in pink and blue

‘Core’

(Image credit: TBC)

a semi circular glass sculpture by John Hogan in amber coloured glass with a blue profile

‘Paragon’

(Image credit: TBC)

amber coloured glass sculpture reflecting light around it

‘JH175’

(Image credit: TBC)

A round glass shape balanced on a table

‘Blushy Disk’

(Image credit: TBC)

Colourful glass sphere

‘Bleach’.

(Image credit: Daniel Villarreal)

Amber coloured semi circular glass sculpture

‘Concave with Blue’

(Image credit: TBC)

green tinted glass sculpture in parallelepiped shape balancing on a curved side

‘Span’

(Image credit: TBC)

a semi circular glass sculpture by John Hogan in amber coloured glass with a blue profile

‘Concave with Blue’

(Image credit: TBC)

Round glass shape in light pink

‘Blushy Disk’

(Image credit: TBC)

INFORMATION

‘John Hogan: Ultraviolet’ is at The Future Perfect through July 2021

thefutureperfect.com (opens in new tab)
johnhogandesigns.com (opens in new tab)

ADDRESS

3085 Sacramento Street
San Francisco, CA

VIEW GOOGLE MAPS (opens in new tab)

Rosa Bertoli was born in Udine, Italy, and now lives in London. Since 2014, she has been the Design Editor of Wallpaper*, where she oversees design content for the print and online editions, as well as special editorial projects. Through her role at Wallpaper*, she has written extensively about all areas of design. Rosa has been speaker and moderator for various design talks and conferences including London Craft Week, Maison & Objet, The Italian Cultural Institute (London), Clippings, Zaha Hadid Design, Kartell and Frieze Art Fair. Rosa has been on judging panels for the Chart Architecture Award, the Dutch Design Awards and the DesignGuild Marks. She has written for numerous English and Italian language publications, and worked as a content and communication consultant for fashion and design brands.

With contributions from