Step inside children's book Goodnight Moon in this immersive New York exhibition

New York collective Fort Makers presents Goodnight House, a collection of furniture and objects inspired by the popular children's book Goodnight Moon and its iconic, colorful interiors

Goodnight Moon furniture
Goodnight House by New York collective Fort Makers features a series of furniture and objects inspired by popular children’s book Goodnight Moon. Pictured here are painted silk curtains by Fort Makers Co-Founder Naomi S. Clark, a ceramic mantelpiece clock by Keith Simpson, a hearth tapestry by Liz Collins, and a painting by Marcel Alcalá within a hand-carved picture frame by Nick DeMarco
(Image credit: Joe Kramm)

Popular children’s book Goodnight Moon is celebrated through a new design project by New York based artist collective Fort Makers; Goodnight House is an immersive exhibition inspired by the 1947 book written by Margaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Clement Hurd.

The short illustrated poem about a young rabbit’s bedtime ritual (which includes repetitive, meditative goodnight wishes to the objects and pictures in the room as well as more abstract entities such as ‘nobody’ and ‘noises everywhere’) is set in a colorful room, whose green walls and red floors have since become legendary. The books’ illustrations include brightly coloured furniture such as a rocking chair and a red bed, a yellow table and stripy curtains. 

Goodnight Moon: from children's classic to design icon

Goodnight Moon furniture

An installation view of Goodnight House, featuring a rug and upholstered bed by Liz Collins, a rocking chair and yellow table by Chiaozza, painting by Marcel Alcalá within a hand-carved picture frame by Nick DeMarco, and a dollhouse light, an eclipse sconce, and hand-carved wooden cubes by Fort Makers

(Image credit: Joe Kramm)

Fort Makers invited a series of designers and studios to reinterpret the bunny’s bedroom (opens in new tab) through a modern lens, with practices whose work embraces the whimsical aesthetic and childlike curiosity inspired by the book. The exhibition presents a collection of contemporary interpretations of the iconic Goodnight Moon furniture and objects, as well as pieces inspired by its vivid colours and shapes. ‘We asked each artist to further rekindle their childlike understanding of the world around them, and create objects uninhibited by the horrors of adulthood,’ says Fort Makers Co-Founder and Creative Director Nana Spears. ‘What better remedy than comfort and play?’

Textile artist Liz Collins created an upholstered bed complete with handwoven textiles, ceramic artist (opens in new tab) Samuel Harvey contributed a table lamp, and designers Adam Frezza & Terri Chiao of Chiaozza created a yellow storage unit (opens in new tab), as well as a rocking chair and table that offer a playful take on the book’s originals. Further objects include artist Nick DeMarco’s carved wooden spoons, candles by Janie Korn and Crying Clover and the book’s blue mantelpiece clock recreated by Keith Simpson.

Goodnight Moon furniture

The exhibition by Fort Makers includes a mantelpiece clock by ceramicist Keith Simpson, shown here alongside Goodnight Moon character-inspired candles by Janie Korn on hand-carved wooden cubes by Fort Makers

(Image credit: Joe Kramm)

‘Since the advent of kindergarten, artists and designers have been absorbed with the power of play and the role it has in fostering creativity in both children and adults,’ adds co-founder Noah Spencer. ‘This power has always been at the forefront of Fort Makers’ design philosophy.’

When Goodnight Moon was first published in 1947, it was considered so progressive for a children’s book that the New York Public Library didn’t carry it for 25 years – but this didn’t stop it from becoming one of the most loved books of all time. ‘While subtly subversive, Goodnight Moon allows us to see through the eyes of a child, and instills in us essential tools for innovation,’ continues Spears. ‘That’s something worth celebrating.’

Goodnight Moon furniture

A series of candles by Crying Clover, recreated in the Goodnight Moon's distinctive colours

(Image credit: Joe Kramm)

Goodnight Moon furniture

An installation view of the exhibition featuring a rug and hearth tapestry by Liz Collins; a painting by Marcel Alcalá within a hand-carved picture frame by Nick DeMarco; painted silk curtains by Naomi S. Clark; a ceramic mantelpiece clock by Keith Simpson; and a rocking chair, stools, and a storage unit by Chiaozza holding ceramics by Lauren Elder and Shino Takeda, and candles by Janie Korn and Crying Clover

(Image credit: Joe Kramm)

Goodnight Moon furniture

Hand-carved wooden spoons by Nick DeMarco and ceramic mugs in the Goodnight Moon colorway by Shino Takeda

(Image credit: Joe Kramm)

Goodnight Moon furniture

The dollhouse light by Nana Spears & Noah Spencer shown on Tamika Rivera's Diosa Lusa, a handwoven rug inspired by a Taíno goddess of the moon

(Image credit: Joe Kramm)

INFORMATION

Until 27 May 2021. fortmakers.com (opens in new tab)

ADDRESS

38 Orchard Street
New York
NY 10002

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Rosa Bertoli was born in Udine, Italy, and now lives in London. Since 2014, she has been the Design Editor of Wallpaper*, where she oversees design content for the print and online editions, as well as special editorial projects. Through her role at Wallpaper*, she has written extensively about all areas of design. Rosa has been speaker and moderator for various design talks and conferences including London Craft Week, Maison & Objet, The Italian Cultural Institute (London), Clippings, Zaha Hadid Design, Kartell and Frieze Art Fair. Rosa has been on judging panels for the Chart Architecture Award, the Dutch Design Awards and the DesignGuild Marks. She has written for numerous English and Italian language publications, and worked as a content and communication consultant for fashion and design brands.

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