Transforming traditions: a new exhibition in London showcases the mind-blowing skill of four Japanese artists

A host of contemporary Japanese artists will showcase their work as part of an exhibition called Surface Tension at London’s White Rainbow Gallery
From Friday 25th September a host of contemporary Japanese artists will showcase their work as part of an exhibition called Surface Tension at London's White Rainbow Gallery in Fitzrovia. Pictured: Sanguinea, Masaya Hashimoto, 2014.
(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist and LONDON GALLERY)

Self-taught sculptor Masaya Hashimoto lives and works in a Buddhist temple, where he makes delicate plant sculptures out of deer bones and antlers. These ethereal, all-white works capture the paper thin leaves of life-size stems gently swaying in the breeze while single blooms are frozen in time just as their petals are beginning to unfold.

From 25 September, Hashimoto's astonishingly-detailed sculptures will be on show alongside the works of a host of other contemporary Japanese artists as part of a show called Surface Tension at London's White Rainbow Gallery (opens in new tab)in Fitzrovia.

Focusing on the work of four contemporary artists who use traditional techniques such as ink painting, woodcuts and carving, the show explores the marriage of traditional art forms with contemporary themes.

Hidenori Yamaguchi, who studied rinsho (the art of creating free-hand copies of established masterpieces) in China, will be showcasing a selection of his meticulous ink wash paintings. Painted using a very fine brush on silk and paper, the paintings are so detailed that at first glance they look like photographs.

Meanwhile, Kumi Machida draws upon her classical training in traditional Japanese Nihonga to create depictions of biomorphic humans awakening from surreal dream-like states and Sachiko Kazama uses the traditional art of woodblock printing to create art works that satirise contemporary society.

Focusing on contemporary artists who use traditional techniques to create their work, the exhibition seeks to expose contemporary artists who are well-known in Japan to a wider European and UK audience

Focusing on contemporary artists who use traditional techniques to create their work, the exhibition seeks to expose contemporary artists who are well-known in Japan to a wider European and UK audience. Pictured: Sachiko Kazama, 9.11 memorial Pavilion, from the HEISESI EXPO 2010, 2010

(Image credit: TBC)

Self-taught sculptor Masaya Hashimoto makes delicate plant sculptures out of deer bones and antlers

Self-taught sculptor Masaya Hashimoto makes delicate plant sculptures out of deer bones and antlers. Left: Masaya Hashimoto, Lilium Ormosanum, 2014; Right: Phyllostachys heterocycla f.pubescens, Masaya Hashimoto, 2014.

(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist and LONDON GALLERY)

Using a very fine brush on silk and paper, Yamaguchi creates meticulous ink wash paintings that look like photographs.

Hidenori Yamaguchi studied rinsho (the art of creating free-hand copies of established masterpieces) in China. Using a very fine brush on silk and paper, Yamaguchi creates meticulous ink wash paintings that look like photographs. Pictured: Promise, Hidenori Yamaguchi, 2015.

(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist)

Yamaguchi uses this ancient and highly-skilled technique to depict contemporary scenery

Yamaguchi uses this ancient and highly-skilled technique to depict contemporary scenery, including everyday objects that resonate with his personal memories. Pictured: Gentle Milestone, Hidenori Yamaguchi, 2015.

(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist)

Sachiko Kazama uses the traditional art of woodblock printing to create art works that satirise contemporary society

Sachiko Kazama uses the traditional art of woodblock printing to create art works that satirise contemporary society. Pictured: Sachiko Kazama, Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy Pavilion, from the HEISESI EXPO 2010, 2010.

(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist)

Kazama remains true to the origins of her medium by using her picture planes to narrate a story

Kazama remains true to the origins of her medium by using her picture planes to narrate a story. Pictured: Sachiko Kazama, Statue of Patriot, from the HEISESI EXPO 2010.

(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist)

Sachiko Kazama, Heisesi Expo Series, 2010

Pictured: Sachiko Kazama, Heisesi Expo Series, 2010 – on going.

(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist)

Kumi Machida draws upon her classical training in traditional Japanese Nihonga to create depictions of biomorphic humans awakening from surreal dream-like states

Meanwhile, Kumi Machida draws upon her classical training in traditional Japanese Nihonga to create depictions of biomorphic humans awakening from surreal dream-like states. Pictured: Kumi Machida, Three Persons, 2003.

(Image credit: Courtesy of the artist)

INFORMATION
Surface Tension is on show at White Rainbow Gallery from 25 September - 7 November, 2015

ADDRESS

White Rainbow Gallery (opens in new tab)
47 Mortimer Street
London W1W 8HJ

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