Handmade X: With Love, the projects

For our annual salute to craft and creativity, we bring together the best designers, artists, and manufacturers to make one-off wonders. Here, browse all the fruits of Handmade 2019. Photography: Alberto Strada / Wallpaper* Handmade X

Handmade X: With Love, the projects

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Compasso’ bench
Gustavo Martini and Testi

The curve of this giant bench, designed by Gustavo Martini, is shaped to encourage sitters to move closer together. What’s more, its polished Grigio Carnico marble – formed in Testi’s workshop in Veneto – creates a slippery surface that makes it virtually impossible to keep your neighbour at arm’s length. ‘Love brings people close together, and this bench makes them stay close together,’ says Martini. 

Gustavo Martini
Born in Rio de Janeiro, Gustavo Martini now lives in Milan, having completed a master’s degree at the city’s Istituto Marangoni. The designer’s recent projects range from a collaboration with Giulio Cappellini to an installation at Rome’s MAXXI museum. gustavomartini.com (opens in new tab)

Testi
Testi’s first workshop in Sant’Ambrogio di Valpolicella, a town between Lake Garda and Verona, was founded by the three sons of marble quarry owner Piero Testi. Today, the brand is one of the leading Italian producers in the natural stone sector. testigroup.com (opens in new tab)

‘Across the Board’ mirror by Laura Lees and Another Brand

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Across the Board’ mirror
Laura Lees and Another Brand

Laura Lees’ design has a two-pronged inspiration. Firstly, she looked to German film The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant, having felt a resonance with the movie’s romantic narrative. Secondly, she made patterns based on bricks and mortar – and eventually merged the two concepts to create a mirror that features two embracing figures disguised within architectural textures. Typical of Lees’ trompe l’oeil aesthetic, the hidden detail calls for a double-take.

Laura Lees
Laura Lees began her creative career studying tapestry at Duncan of Jordanstone college in Dundee, and embroidery is at the heart of her artistic and commercial practice. Her eclectic style has seen her work with collaborators ranging from fashion brands Sibling and Giles to musicians The Strokes and Courtney Love, as well as designers such as Bethan Laura Wood. laura-lees.com (opens in new tab)

Another Brand
Another Brand pairs manufacturer and designer together to create collections of furniture, which can be altered to fit any specification. Creatively led by designer Theo Williams, the London-based company currently collaborates with the likes of Studiomama and Emile Jones. anotherbrand.co.uk (opens in new tab)

‘Amaranth’ by Lars Beller Fjetland and Bottega Ghianda

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Amaranth’
Lars Beller Fjetland and Bottega Ghianda

These beautifully crafted ducks were inspired by the Korean tradition of gifting newlyweds a pair of wooden waterbirds to symbolise their nuptials. With the help of the Bottega Ghianda craftsmen, Lars Beller Fjetland has carved, shaped and polished his own flock of (featherless) friends, creating a design that has more to it than first meets the eye. Each features a secret compartment for concealing a single wooden ring. While one duck is made from maple, two have been produced from amaranth – a species of wood also known as purpleheart, which gradually changes colour with the passing of time.

Lars Beller Fjetland
Having spent his childhood on the west coast of Norway, Lars Beller Fjetland developed a taste for natural materials. He graduated from the Bergen National Academy of the Arts in 2012, and now specialises in the creation of functional, Scandinavian-style objects. beller.no (opens in new tab)

Bottega Ghianda
Italian master woodworker Bottega Ghianda has a rich history of creating fine furniture dating back to the 19th century. Now, under creative director Michele De Lucchi, the company continues to develop collections alongside designers such as Naoto Fukasawa, Jean Nouvel and Carl Magnusson. bottegaghianda.com (opens in new tab)

Blanket by Asylum and Turnball & Asser

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Blanket
Asylum and Turnball & Asser

‘My earliest memory of love is the act of my mother tucking me in bed with a blanket so that I felt the warmth, both physically and psychologically,’ says Asylum founder Chris Lee. Inspired by what he calls a universal gesture of love, he had the idea to create a patchwork blanket, drawing from the archives of one of London’s finest tie-makers, Turnbull & Asser. Lee and his team chose the tie as a symbol of working, of ‘bringing home the bread’, representing ‘a subtle message for us not to forget the different ways in which love touches us’. The tie patterns were arranged into a patchwork blanket by the skilled team at Turnbull & Asser, creating a captivating piece conveying a multilayered message of love.

Asylum
Founded by Chris Lee in 1999, Asylum is a Singapore-based multidisciplinary studio that focuses on unconventional design solutions with a quirky bent. Its projects include interiors and branding for hotels, restaurants, offices and retail across Asia, with recent clients including Aesop, Anzara Resorts and Johnnie Walker. theasylum.com.sg (opens in new tab)

Turnbull & Asser
One of Britain’s tailoring institutions, Turnbull & Asser has been in business since 1885, providing for those in need of bespoke and made-to-measure ties and shirts, including the British Royal Family. Garments are made in its Gloucestershire and Kent factories by a team of expert craftsmen, some of whom have been with the company for decades. turnbullandasser.co.uk (opens in new tab)

‘Aphrodite’ collection by Robin Grasby and Temmer

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Aphrodite’ collection
Robin Grasby and Temmer

Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love, is famed for her association with passion, pleasure and procreation. So impressive is her legacy that she is the namesake of marble company Temmer’s grey and pink Afrodit stone. For Handmade, small pieces of the material travelled from Temmer’s Turkish quarry to the east London studio of designer Robin Grasby, who specialises in turning marble offcuts into beautiful terrazzo surfaces. In this case, his work provides a base for seductive side tables.

Robin Grasby
Robin Grasby has developed a technique to repurpose waste material from the stone industry – marble flour, chips and offcuts – which he mixes with resin and custom pigments to create a hardwearing, terrazzo surface called Altrock, which can be applied to interior and furniture design projects. altrocksurfaces.com (opens in new tab)

Temmer
The leading natural stone company in Turkey, Temmer was founded in Afyon in 1998, and now owns one of the country’s largest marble quarries. It produces blocks, slabs and cut-to-size products and exports to 50 countries. temmermarble.com (opens in new tab)

‘Echo’ lamp by Brendan Ravenhill Studio and Maison Intègre

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Echo’ lamp
Brendan Ravenhill Studio and Maison Intègre

The sculptural ‘Echo’ lamp uses light and bronze as the material embodiment of two people in love. Two curved bronze shells, one a light source and the other a reflector, appear to dance around and envelop each other as a metaphor for how love is best understood when projected upon others. Without the other, each piece would be unable to function: the reflector would sit dark, while the lamp alone would cast a harsh direct light. Together, they unite to create a beautiful formation and glow. 

Brendan Ravenhill Studio
This LA-based studio specialises in modern, understated lighting and furniture design. Founded in 2010, the company manufactures all its products in the US and works with restaurateurs, hotels and brands to produce unique projects tailored to specific spaces. brendanravenhill.com (opens in new tab)

Maison Intègre
Maison Intègre provides a platform for West African arts and crafts, celebrating local creatives and building cultural bridges. Having lived in Burkina Faso for many years, Ambre Jarno founded the company and Paris showroom in 2017. Through relationships with antique dealers and artisans, Maison Intègre researches, selects and develops pieces, combining traditional techniques with contemporary forms. maisonintegre.com (opens in new tab)

‘Collector’s case’ by Lanzavecchia + Wai and Globe-Trotter

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Collector’s case
Lanzavecchia + Wai and Globe-Trotter

Design duo Lanzavecchia + Wai chose to focus on the theme of self-love, which led them to the idea of travel as a quest for personal growth. ‘New locations and situations widen world views and enrich personal definitions of self, love, happiness, kindness and friendship,’ the pair explain. Inspired by late-19th century intercontinental exploration, they landed on the idea of creating a suitcase, designed to gather objects collected en route. British luggage-maker Globe-Trotter worked on a concertina design in multicoloured Italian calf, with a structure made using the company’s patented vulcanised fibreboard comprising 14 layers of compressed recycled paper, cotton, and wood pulp sourced from sustainable forests. 

Lanzavecchia + Wai
This design studio was founded in 2009 by Francesca Lanzavecchia and Hunn Wai, who met while studying at Design Academy Eindhoven. Now based in Milan and Singapore, the duo merge different design disciplines and focus on the human body, future trends and the fusion of materials, forms and meanings. The pair have collaborated with the likes of Living Divani, Cappellini and Gallotti & Radice. lanzavecchia-wai.com (opens in new tab)

Globe-Trotter
For more than 100 years, Globe-Trotter has been creating pieces with an uncompromising emphasis on craftsmanship, making it the brand of choice for historic names such as Edmund Hillary and Winston Churchill, as well as the design-minded contemporary traveller. Over the past decade, head designer Charlotte Seddon has championed special projects for Globe-Trotter, including the introduction of leather goods in 2013, as well as collaborations with Erdem, Tiffany and Gucci. globe-trotter.com (opens in new tab)

‘Arched’ centrepiece by Guglielmo Poletti and Arven

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Arched’ centrepiece
Guglielmo Poletti and Arven

This silver centrepiece by Guglielmo Poletti comes in two parts, and is only complete when both are coupled together. Realised by the silversmiths of Norwegian company Arven, the design features curving bars made in silver and brass. With its gently arcing form, the centrepiece can be used to display a precious object or simply a piece of fruit. Poletti imagines it as a conversation starter at a dinner party.

Guglielmo Poletti
Italian designer Guglielmo Poletti studied at Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands before setting up his own studio in Milan. He has developed a specific design language, concerned not only with the materiality of objects, but also the notions of balance and simplicity. guglielmopoletti.com (opens in new tab)

Arven
Founded by Theodor Olsen in 1868 in Bergen, Arven has become central to Norway’s silversmithing industry, working alongside designers to create contemporary pieces rooted in traditional techniques. arven.no (opens in new tab)

‘Essenziale’ scent diffusers by Ilaria Bianchi, Ostens and Il Marmo

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Essenziale’ scent diffusers
Ilaria Bianchi, Ostens and Il Marmo

When handed the theme of love to chew on, team Ostens, with the help of the perfumer Juliette Karagueuzoglou, chose to develop a scent that evokes the warm embrace of family. Orange flower and dulce de leche notes combine to form a comforting, nostalgic scent, called Impression Orange Flower Absolute. Ilaria Bianchi evolved the idea of childhood nostalgia further by introducing to the project a series of diffusing devices made from brass and porous marble that evoke nursery mobiles and balancing toys. Exercised by the notion that our sense of smell needs to be nurtured from childhood, Ostens and Bianchi worked to make the diffuser not only a thing of beauty but also an instrument of learning. The skilful marble inlays, executed by the artisans of Il Marmo, denote the botanical elements of the scent. 

Ilaria Bianchi
Having studied industrial design in Turin and ceramic, furniture and jewellery design at London’s Central Saint Martins, Pisa-born Ilaria Bianchi founded her multidisciplinary studio in Milan in 2015. ilabianchi.com (opens in new tab)

Ostens
London-based fragrance brand Ostens was launched in 2018 by Frenchman Laurent Delafon and New Zealander Christopher Yu. They work closely with the Grasse-based scent laboratory IFF-LMR to produce both fragrance oils and fully formed perfumes. ostens.com (opens in new tab)

Il Marmo
Founded in 1991 in Verona, Il Marmo lends marble expertise to the work of architects such as Peter Marino and Massimiliano Fuksas, furnishing the interiors of a host of luxury boutiques, private homes and hotels. ilmarmo.it (opens in new tab)

‘Blushing Bar’ by Chan + Eayrs, Sebastian Cox and American Hardwood Export Council

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Blushing Bar’
Chan + Eayrs, Sebastian Cox and American Hardwood Export Council

Our ‘Blushing Bar’ is all about new encounters and first dates taking place over a cool drink. Designed by Chan + Eayrs in a circular shape, the bar comprises ten freestanding elements, neatly referencing Wallpaper* Handmade’s tenth anniversary this year. Each bar section is dedicated to a different aspect of the cocktail-making process – there’s a flower bed, an ice box and a herb garden. Made of American red oak using the specialist skills of Sebastian Cox, the structure features hot pink ‘veins’, where colour has been pressed into the planks to create a ‘blushing’ effect.

Chan + Eayrs
Husband-and-wife team Zoe Chan and Merlin Eayrs started their professional partnership in London in 2014, and have been crafting beautiful bespoke architecture ever since. Their unconventional, holistic approach to architecture means that they are personally involved in every step of the process. chanandeayrs.com (opens in new tab)

Sebastian Cox
Championing British woodworking, Sebastian Cox and his design studio and workshop are experts in creating finely crafted installations, furniture, lighting and accessories from their base in south-east London. Founded in 2010, there’s little this studio cannot do with wood. sebastiancox.co.uk (opens in new tab)

American Hardwood Export Council
A leading international trade association for the US hardwood industry, the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) is our go-to choice for hardwood timber. americanhardwood.org (opens in new tab)

Bookcase by Gesa Hansen and Skagerak

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Bookcase
Gesa Hansen and Skagerak

Designer Gesa Hansen called upon her fondness for reading in interpreting Handmade’s theme of love. Books are celebrated and displayed like ornaments on this wooden bookcase, crafted in collaboration with Danish brand Skagerak. Wood-turned elements give the piece a sculptural feel.

Gesa Hansen
Born into a long line of Danish designers, Gesa Hansen founded her own studio, aptly named The Hansen Family, in 2009. She works alongside traditional artisans to produce collections of furniture and bespoke solutions for interior design projects. gesahansen.com (opens in new tab)

Skagerak
Founded in 1976, Skagerak is today owned by Jesper and Vibeke Panduro. The company prides itself on its Scandinavian design roots and traditional craftsmanship, and operates from the northern Danish city of Aalborg. skagerak.dk (opens in new tab)

‘Cabinet of Love’ by OEO Studio, Garde Hvalsøe, Bergmann Audio, Gato Audio and Dahlman 1807

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Cabinet of Love’
OEO Studio, Garde Hvalsøe, Bergmann Audio, Gato Audio and Dahlman 1807

This audio station – centered on a modular cabinet in smoked oak, with burnished brass, leather and pietra di Fossena – is ‘a tribute to premium cabinetmaking and music’, say the teams behind it, ‘a beautiful piece for modern times, celebrating the ritual of playing music the old-school way’. Designed by OEO Studio and made by Garde Hvalsøe, it comes with a custom-finish vinyl turntable and amplifier, respectively by Bergmann Audio and Gato Audio, and Dahlman 1807’s vinyl bag (adapted from an architect’s bag, designed by Erik Herløw in 1942) and vinyl brush. 

OEO Studio
Founded by Thomas Lykke and Anne-Marie Buemann, the Danish studio is best known for restaurant interiors (such as Copenhagen’s Kadeau), furniture and product design. oeo.dk (opens in new tab)

Garde Hvalsøe
A Danish purveyor of bespoke kitchens (notably at Kadeau, with OEO Studio, and the home of Noma’s René Redzepi) and furniture. gardehvalsoe.dk (opens in new tab)

Bergmann Audio
Danish engineer Johnnie Bergmann’s brand specialises in air-bearing turntables, with linear tracking tonearms to minimise friction. bergmannaudio.com (opens in new tab)

Gato Audio
Designed and built in Denmark, Gato Audio’s equipment possesses both strength and finesse to bring the subtlest musical details to life. gato-audio.com (opens in new tab)

Dahlman 1807
Jeppe Dencker, Tove Christensen and Mikkel Lyshøj revived Denmark’s oldest leather brand in 2017, producing archival and new pieces. dahlman1807.com (opens in new tab)

‘Centres of Rotation’ by Kasper Kjeldgaard and Fritz Hansen

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Centres of Rotation’
Kasper Kjeldgaard and Fritz Hansen

 Kasper Kjeldgaard’s lamp design, created in collaboration with Fritz Hansen, is made up of two parts – an illuminated disk made from beeswax and a bent brass rod that not only supports it, but disguises any electrical wiring. The project’s name is an ode to the craft-intensive process used to create the disk, which involved spinning its wooden centre thousands of times in a bath of melted wax. 

Kasper Kjeldgaard
Danish designer Kjeldgaard takes all forms of craftsmanship into account when developing his ideas. Since graduating from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 2016, he has exhibited his work internationally, including at the Mindcraft exhibition in Milan and New York’s Patrick Parrish Gallery. kasperkasper.com (opens in new tab)

Fritz Hansen
Founded in Denmark in 1872, Fritz Hansen has since worked with leading international designers to create iconic pieces of furniture. It is the brand behind Arne Jacobsen’s Egg, Swan and Series 7 chairs, and Poul Kjærholm’s PK22 chair and PK80 daybed. fritzhansen.com (opens in new tab)

‘Clink’ coin holder by Brandon Yeo and Svenskt Tenn

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Clink’ coin holder
Brandon Yeo and Svenskt Tenn

Brandon Yeo, winner of our Wallpaper* Handmade Next Generation Singapore Designer competition, designed this coin holder as ‘a whimsical take on a coin bank inspired by parental love’. Coins are placed on a small platform, which collapses and drops them into a storage area underneath when the weight of more coins is added to the top. Yeo recalls how, when he was growing up, his parents always stressed the importance of saving. ‘The mechanism is inspired by my parents’ financial responsibility to the family. The daily contribution of coins to ‘Clink’ represents the accumulation of savings,’ he says. The piece was produced by Swedish brand Svenskt Tenn, using its expertise in pewter manufacturing.

Brandon Yeo
Brandon Yeo’s modus operandi is based on the ‘small euphoric gap between knowing nothing and understanding something’, a principle he applies to his industrial design experiments. Following degrees from Singapore’s Temasek Polytechnic and Lasalle College of the Arts, Yeo has gained accolades for projects including lounge chairs, glue guns, portable picnic devices and jewellery. behance.net/yiliangyeo (opens in new tab)

Svenskt Tenn
Founded in 1924 by pewter artist Estrid Ericson, Svenskt Tenn has collaborated with a long list of legendary creatives, from functionalist architect Uno Ahren to Austrian designer Josef Frank, many of whose pieces are still in production today. svenskttenn.se (opens in new tab)

‘Family’ crystal titanium cutlery by Studio Word and Architectural Titanium

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Family’ crystal titanium cutlery
Studio Word and Architectural Titanium

These oddly shaped knives, forks and spoons by Studio Word’s Kyuhyung Cho and Jungyou Choi are purposefully designed not to match; instead, the distinct pieces are an ode to the differences among the human race. Manufactured by Architectural Titanium, each piece has gone through a rigorous production process to create an end product that is both incredibly strong and light. ‘As people pair up the different forms in their daily lives, they can imagine various shapes of love too,’ say the designers. 

Studio Word
Seoul-based designers Kyuhyung Cho and Jungyou Choi work together to create simple designs for everyday life. While Cho has a master’s degree in storytelling from Stockholm’s Konstfack university, Choi was educated at the Design Academy Eindhoven and ECAL. Together, they have collaborated with the likes of Menu, Iittala, Hermès, NakNak and Yeol. studio-word.com (opens in new tab)

Architectural Titanium
US company Architectural Titanium is known worldwide for its large-scale manufacturing capabilities for titanium in architecture, design and art projects. Its Kansas HQ is led by president Gary Nemchock, who oversees a number of US outposts specialising in each part of the making process. architecturaltitanium.com (opens in new tab)

Console by Clara Yee and Da a

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Console
Clara Yee and Da a

Clara Yee’s intention to communicate a ‘cosmic universal message of love’ led her to explore the development of broadcasting technology. The very first live global satellite broadcast, which included The Beatles performing All You Need Is Love, inspired Yee to ponder the many changes in communications over the years. ‘Half a century later, communications technology has transformed,’ she says. ‘Just as we used to sit around TVs, now we anchor our lives around WiFi.’ To broadcast Wallpaper* Handmade’s message of love, she created a temple-like stand for a WiFi router, working with Italian furniture maker Da a. Yee’s design (in the shape of an abstract satellite dish) was brought to life thanks to the company’s unconventional treatment of metal: the iron surface was processed by hand using natural extracts from plants and minerals, resulting in a texture reminiscent of otherworldly cosmic explosions. 

Clara Yee
A graduate of London’s Central Saint Martins, Yee started her career as an illustrator before branching out to work in a variety of creative fields. She has collaborated with the likes of Alexander McQueen, Warner Music and Airbnb, both independently and through the creative studio she co-founded, In the Wild. clarayee.com (opens in new tab)

Da a
Based in Puglia, Italy, Da a uses heavy-duty industrial production methods to create furniture. Specialising in metal and stone manufacturing, the brand has been working on developing a variety of finishes and experimental compositions, in collaboration with Italian architects and designers. daaitalia.com (opens in new tab)

‘Constellations of Us’ vessels by Marine Julié and Rückl

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Constellations of Us’ vessels
Marine Julié and Rückl

An exuberant love scene in miniature scale is deployed all around the curved forms of two vessels – called ‘Us One’ and ‘Us Two’ – crafted by Czech crystal maker Rückl in collaboration with artist Marine Julié. Reminiscent of primitive forms, hybrid figures entangle with one another in what Julié calls a ‘farandole of bisexual beings’. The artist hand-sketched the scroll-like scene, with no beginning or end, directly onto the vessels and it was then hand-etched into the crystal by a Rückl master craftsman. 

Marine Julié
A graduate of ECAL, Marine Julié is a French artist based in Switzerland. Her drawings of primitive and anthropomorphic forms are frequently painted at a large scale onto both architectural spaces and natural rock faces. marinejulie.com (opens in new tab)

Rückl
The Rückl glassworks has been renowned for quality cut crystal and craftsmanship since 1846. Located in Central Bohemia, it produces both traditional designs and contemporary collections, with some pieces inspired by the work of Czech writer Franz Kafka. ruckl.com (opens in new tab)

‘Cupboard Love’ by Lekker and Zeitraum

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Cupboard Love’ Lekker and Zeitraum

‘We are fascinated by couples, especially odd ones,’ say Ong Ker-Shing and Joshua Comaroff of design studio Lekker. ‘The couple becomes something of its own, a new whole created from two diverse halves – which may or may not match in aesthetic terms.’ With this idea in mind, Lekker designed this liquor cabinet composed of two contrasting entities merged into a beautifully crafted piece of furniture, made of ash wood and adorned with brass knobs by German specialist Zeitraum.  Lekker One of Singapore’s most versatile architecture and design practices, Lekker is run by founder and director Ong Ker-Shing (whose Harvard degrees encompass fine arts, architecture and landscape architecture) and her partner, design consultant Joshua Comaroff. The practice’s portfolio comprises buildings, interiors, objects, furniture and installations. lekker.sg Zeitraum From its base in the Bavarian Alps, Zeitraum produces furniture pieces that combine smart design with an environmentally conscious spirit. Its sustainably sourced hardwoods are processed in state-of-the-art workshops with no chemical treatment of the wood. zeitraum-moebel.de

‘Desert Shore’ lamp by Alighieri and Porta Romana

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Desert Shore’ lamp
Alighieri and Porta Romana

This sculptural lamp, its name a reference to the idea of found treasure, is made of a single curved sheet of forged steel, trimmed with a subtle lipped rim. Its two ends overlap yet never quite touch, creating a playful dialogue between two parts that also form one whole. The outer layer is finished in fired copper, a smooth dark bronze speckled with a copper-leaf finish, while the interior is lined with a contrasting textured-gold finish. Both facets celebrate the meticulous production process in the Porta Romana workshop. 

Alighieri
Launched in 2014 by London-based Rosh Mahtani, Alighieri’s jewellery collection comprises medallion necklaces, accessories and mismatched earrings inspired by Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy. Cast in 24ct gold-plated bronze and characterised by the acceptance of raw imperfection, its designs embody the poet’s classic narratives. alighieri.co.uk (opens in new tab)

Porta Romana
With humble beginnings as a London workshop in 1988, Porta Romana has since become a key player in bespoke artisan design, its specialist glassblowers, ceramicists and metal workers crafting a wide range of artisanal furnishings. With founders Sarah and Andrew Hills at the helm, it works on commercial, residential and yacht interiors, focusing on originality and endurance. portaromana.com (opens in new tab)

‘Dialogo’ salt and pepper mills by Charles Zana and Atelier François Pouenat

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Dialogo’ salt and pepper mills
Charles Zana and Atelier François Pouenat

Charles Zana and his team have taken salt and pepper, the classic coupling for tabletop seasoning, and sought to make a perfect design pairing. Cast from copper and brass in the French workshops of François Pouenat, their complementary mills function happily independently, but sit in a romantic embrace when at rest, nestling on a rectangular tray. The inverted metal applications on each piece are designed to show the complexity of love and its need for both differences and similarities to succeed. 

Charles Zana
An alumnus of the Beaux-Arts de Paris, Charles Zana founded his architectural agency in the French capital in 1990. His portfolio spans residential homes, hotels, showrooms, restaurants and furnishings, with projects from Monaco and London to New York and Tel Aviv. zana.fr (opens in new tab)

Atelier François Pouenat
For more than 130 years, Atelier François Pouenat has been at the cutting edge of metalwork. At the helm of the family business today is fifth-generation ironworker François Pouenat, a Compagnons du Devoir-trained artisan. Based near Nièvre in central France, the atelier collaborates with architects and designers to create bespoke pieces of furniture and artworks. atelierfrancoispouenat.com (opens in new tab)

‘Drawing Collectible Toys’ by Hayon Studio and Caran d’Ache

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Drawing Collectible Toys’
Hayon Studio and Caran d’Ache

The playful figures of Jaime Hayon – love letters to the human imagination – have often been created in ceramic, but for Handmade, the designer has developed two new designs made from Caran d’Ache’s Neocolor 1 wax oil pastel. Known for their smooth texture, luminous colours and lightfastness, and beloved by artists and technical designers alike, the brand’s pastels on this occasion have become artworks in their own right. This display illustrates the design and production of the figures and includes: Hayon’s sketches; the raw material (Neocolor 1 chips), which is melted into a paste and mixed with paraffin; the dedicated silicone moulds; and prototypes of the figures. As well as being collectible, each figure is usable. ‘It’s a contradiction, because you want to have it, but you also break it and draw with it. I find it quite surreal in a way, and very attractive,’ says Hayon.

Hayon Studio
Founded by artist and designer Jaime Hayon in 2001, the Valencia-based studio is known for its joyful embrace of colour, decoration and cartoon-figure curves. Its projects range from furniture, lighting and objets d’art, to interior design and apparel (a fashion collaboration with Jasper Morrison launched in late 2017). Two recent shows for Galerie Kreo offered a playful riff on the crafts and textures of Africa. hayonstudio.com (opens in new tab)

Caran d’Ache
Since its beginnings as the first Swiss pencil factory (founded in 1915), Caran d’Ache has produced writing and drawing instruments that combine advanced materials with innovative skills, including the world’s first mechanical pencil and water-soluble pencil. The fourth-generation family business continues to produce solely from its Geneva workshops. Recent collaborators include Mario Botta, Paul Smith and Peter Marino. carandache.com (opens in new tab)

‘Forest of Theoretical Sex Toys’ by Douglas Coupland and Architectural Association School of Architecture

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Forest of Theoretical Sex Toys’
Douglas Coupland and Architectural Association School of Architecture

Working closely with the Architectural Association’s state-of-the-art Digital Prototyping Lab and its advanced 3D-printing technologies, Douglas Coupland interprets love playfully by developing a ‘forest’ of sex toys. The artwork is inspired by architectural landscapes and a painting of gathering trees in Georgian Bay by Canadian artist Lawren Harris, who was part of the country’s Group Of Seven school of landscape painting. 

Douglas Coupland
With a portfolio spanning literary work, art, design and journalism (including pieces for Wallpaper*), there is little the multi-award-winning Canadian novelist and artist Douglas Coupland cannot turn his hand to. coupland.com (opens in new tab)

Architectural Association School of Architecture
The Architectural Association’s reputation for excellence is well-established, while its list of alumni, including Zaha Hadid and Rem Koolhaas, reads like a who’s who of modern architecture. Founded in 1847, the AA school, as it’s known, is now led by its first female director, Eva Franch i Gilabert. aaschool.ac.uk (opens in new tab)

‘Imbrication’ pendant light by Charlotte Juillard and VitrA

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Imbrication’ pendant light
Charlotte Juillard and VitrA

Soft, round shapes sit upon an elongated metal structure to make up this slightly suggestive pendant light designed by Charlotte Juillard. A master of minimalism, Juillard formed each section of her design from simple materials, combining VitrA’s ceramic expertise with brushed metal sections. Like any loving relationship, Juillard’s pendant light relies on the power of equilibrium, meaning one section cannot be moved without the other. 

Charlotte Juillard
Based in Paris, Charlotte Juillard founded her creative studio in 2014. A nominee for Wallpaper* and Panerai’s Next Generation Designer of the Year award in 2018, Juillard prioritises craftwork in all her projects. She has collaborated with the likes of Ligne Roset, Christian Lacroix and Seletti. charlottejuillard.com (opens in new tab)

VitrA
Bathroom company VitrA has a history that dates back to 1909, when Turkish pharmacist Süleyman Ferit Eczacibaşi began producing bathing and cologne products at his pharmacy in Izmir. By 1958, the family had opened its own ceramic sanitaryware factory in Istanbul, marking the birth of VitrA as we know it today. The company, which has collaborated with designers such as Ross Lovegrove and Matteo Thun, now has 150 showrooms and 2,000 sales points worldwide. vitraglobal.com (opens in new tab)

‘Isla’ picnic set by Design Haus Liberty and Yerra

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Isla’ picnic set
Design Haus Liberty and Yerra

Alfresco dining is an integral part of South American culinary tradition. Uruguay-based hide and rug manufacturer Yerra teamed up with British architecture and design studio Design Haus Liberty to take the picnic experience to the next level. Yerra paired its ethically sourced, quality materials with Design Haus Liberty’s knack for luxury design to produce a bespoke rug, in materials including alpaca, as well as a mat, cushions, a basket, and a bottle holder. 

Design Haus Liberty
Architect Dara Huang, Design Haus Liberty’s principal, graduated from Harvard and worked with Herzog & de Meuron and Foster + Partners before founding her own multidisciplinary studio in 2013. With an HQ in London and an office in Hong Kong, it is known for high-end architectural projects spanning the residential and commercial fields, as well as interior design and branding. dhliberty.com (opens in new tab)

Yerra
Founded by Santiago Schapira in 2004, Yerra specialises in high-quality rugs in fine hide, fur and other natural (as well as ethically and sustainably sourced) materials. Rooted in South American tradition, the contemporary luxury maker’s products are handcrafted in Argentina and Uruguay. yerrarugs.com (opens in new tab)

‘Joints’ woven rug by Studio Wieki Somers and Passamaneria Italiana

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Joints’ woven rug
Studio Wieki Somers and Passamaneria Italiana

The woven elements of this rug were handcrafted by Studio Wieki Somers, using materials from the Italian manufacturer Passamaneria Italiana. Describing the rug as being an ‘isolated place in a domestic landscape’, the designers wanted to create a meeting point where lovers can sit or lie together in the middle of the floor. The weave, meanwhile, denotes the coming together of separate elements to create a whole. 

Studio Wieki Somers
Studio Wieki Somers was founded by Wieki Somers and Dylan van den Berg in 2003, after they met at Design Academy Eindhoven in the 1990s. The pair have become known for their fantastical takes on ordinary objects and have pieces in the permanent collections of museums such as London’s V&A and New York’s MoMA. They have a long-standing relationship with Paris’ Galerie Kreo, and create designs for the likes of Arita and Hermès. wiekisomers.com (opens in new tab)

Passamaneria Italiana
Based in Piedmont, Passamaneria Italiana has been manufacturing textile trimmings for both fashion and furniture design, including braids, laces, fringes, pipings and tassels, since its creation in 1925. passamaneriaitaliana.com (opens in new tab)

Kitchen sink system by OTOMOTO with Cosentino and Matheson Whiteley

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Kitchen sink system
OTOMOTO with Cosentino and Matheson Whiteley

Inspired by space-saving kitchen units often seen in Japan, OTOMOTO’s system comprises a full-length sink made from Cosentino’s Silestone material, atop a timber frame. The sink has an upper lip or runner to hold up to six chopping boards of paulownia wood, which can be set side by side to create a worktop; and a lower one to support modular Gastronorm containers, a staple of industrial kitchens that can be reconfigured with ease. Creators Ryan Gander and Tony Chambers, who realised this prototype with architects Matheson Whiteley, were motivated by ergonomics and moved by the function and elemental beauty of Gastronorm. ‘It makes sense that a kitchen moves around the chef, not that the chef moves around the kitchen,’ say Gander and Chambers. ‘The sink saves space, time and energy.’ The system speaks to a love of thoughtful simplicity in an often oversized and overcluttered material world. 

OTOMOTO
This is a new lifestyle venture by artist Ryan Gander and former Wallpaper* editor-in-chief Tony Chambers that starts here and will see other products launch from 02.02.2020. ‘It’s everything and the kitchen sink,’ say the founders. The name, a palindrome, is derived from the Japanese motto ‘close at hand’. otomoto-life.com (opens in new tab)

Cosentino
A leading purveyor of architectural and design surfaces, such as Silestone, an exceptionally resilient quartz compound; Dekton, a blend of glass, porcelain and quartz; and natural stone. cosentino.com (opens in new tab)

Matheson Whiteley
Donald Matheson and Jason Whiteley founded their London architectural studio in 2012. Ongoing projects include the refurbishment of Stuttgart’s Künstlerhaus. mathesonwhiteley.com (opens in new tab)

‘You are not alone’ chocolates by Studio Frith and Coco Chocolatier

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘You are not alone’ chocolates
Studio Frith and Coco Chocolatier

‘You are not alone’, spell out these chocolates by Coco Chocolatier and Studio Frith. The maxim is inspired by an Orson Welles quote: ‘We’re born alone, we live alone, we die alone. Only through our love and friendship can we create the illusion for the moment that we’re not alone.’ Taking cues from structural typography, and the use of type in the work of Ed Ruscha and Yoko Ono, Studio Frith created a ‘kissing’ typeface. The lack of packaging is an intentional decision, with sustainability in mind. 

Studio Frith
Founded in 2009 by Frith Kerr, Studio Frith is a graphic design consultancy with a passion for bringing a playful energy to visual identity. The studio’s output spans typeface design, art direction and brand strategy, while its clients include leading cultural institutions such as the Frieze art fair and Guggenheim New York. studiofrith.com (opens in new tab)

Coco Chocolatier
This Edinburgh-based artisan chocolatier crafts premium chocolate from the finest, ethically sourced South American cocoa. Not only does it experiment with unique flavour combinations, but its packaging also sports bold designs by independent artists. cocochocolatier.com (opens in new tab)

‘Love Handles’ by Anarchitect and Otzi London

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Love Handles’
Anarchitect and Otzi London

‘Door handles are a bit of an obsession in architecture circles,’ say Jonathan and Militza Ashmore of Dubai- and London-based practice Anarchitect. ‘They are a nostalgic symbol of our most precious commodity – privacy.’ Playing up to this infatuation, the practice dreamt up its own ideal range of levers and knobs – each covered in a layer of foam and soft leather to ensure a tactile experience, which they liken to holding the hand of a loved one. 

Anarchitect
Anarchitect was founded in 2013 by Jonathan Ashmore, who now also leads the practice alongside his wife, Militza. The team works across architecture, interior and design projects in the Middle East, Europe and Asia. anarchitect.com (opens in new tab)

Otzi London
This design studio was set up by Otis Ingrams, a leather designer whose CV includes an apprenticeship with Bill Amberg Studio and a degree from San Francisco State University. His team works closely with designers, interior designers, artists, makers and brands to create one-of-a-kind items all with a strong focus on craftsmanship. otzilondon.com (opens in new tab)

Love letter opener by Castro Smith and Blenheim Forge

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Love letter opener
Castro Smith and Blenheim Forge

Receiving a handwritten letter in the post can be one of life’s greatest pleasures. In a world of instant communication via text and email, the process of opening an envelope offers an almost ritualistic experience. Blenheim Forge has crafted this love letter opener to add to the joy, with a double-edged blade for ease and efficiency and a tactile handle thanks to textural engravings from London-based jeweller Castro Smith. 

Castro Smith
With an aesthetic rooted in tradition, jeweller Castro Smith began his career with an apprenticeship at The Goldsmiths’ Company, before travelling to Japan to study with master engravers and metal workers. He is currently one of the artists-in-residence at Alexander McQueen’s Sarabande Foundation. castrosmith.com (opens in new tab)

Blenheim Forge
Self-taught craftsmen Jon Warshawsky, James Ross-Harris and Richard Warner operate this foundry from a converted railway arch in London’s Peckham neighbourhood. The foundry creates knives for some of the world’s most exclusive restaurants and top-class chefs. blenheimforge.co.uk (opens in new tab)

‘Love Rocker’ by Owen Bullett Studio and Heerenhuis

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Love Rocker’

Owen Bullett Studio and Heerenhuis

This harmonious seat for two by Heerenhuis and Owen Bullett Studio was crafted using thermowood techniques, where the wood is heated to reduce moisture, halving its weight and making the piece light enough to be rocked. Heerenhuis applied its specialist carpentry skills to prepare half circle-shaped sections of wood that lock into one another, while Owen Bullett Studio’s signature carving techniques add texture. But the ‘Love Rocker’ only truly comes to life when two people sit on it. As their combined weight balances the seat, the sitters can gently rock each other and share a playful moment. 

Owen Bullett Studio

An alumnus of London’s Royal College of Art and Camberwell College of Arts, sculptor Owen Bullett works predominantly with wood and painted steel to create bold geometric sculptures and pieces of furniture. owenbullett.com

Heerenhuis

Belgian table and chair maker Heerenhuis has been producing designs from its Antwerp factory for the last ten years. Having started out as an antiques dealer, the brand moved on to making bespoke furniture and is renowned for its straightforward, uncomplicated designs in reclaimed teak and French oak. heerenhuis.be

‘Love’ vases by Pete Pongsak and Espasso

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Love’ vases
Pete Pongsak and Espasso

Inspired by the simplicity of ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement, this series of vases represents three stages of falling in love: kissing, touching and lovemaking. Pete Pongsak’s design explores the ephemeral nature of these acts with two forms that gently lock together through their own weight. The idea stems from a painted Peruvian ceramic jar, part of the British Museum’s collection, that shows two figures locked in an embrace. Each of Pongsak’s vases is made of two materials, American walnut and emerald onyx, chosen with the help of Espasso; the wood was selected for its strong grain, in order to complement the decorative pattern of the stone. The vases’ sculptural forms take their cues from architectural elements, such as columns, archways and steps. 

Pete Pongsak
Having launched his career as a menswear designer working for the likes of Burberry and Nicole Farhi, London-based Pete Pongsak has more recently branched out into the design world, elevating everyday objects in natural stone. Before founding his practice Archive & Archive in 2017, Pongsak worked for David Collins Studio. archiveandarchive.com (opens in new tab)

Espasso
Founded by Carlos Junqueira in New York in 2002, this Brazilian furniture purveyor specialises in works by iconic designers such as Lina Bo Bardi, Isay Weinfeld and Oscar Niemeyer. A leading resource for midcentury and contemporary design, it has showrooms in Miami, Los Angeles and London. espasso.com (opens in new tab)

Memento by Lai Chan and Kelham Island Concrete

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Memento
Lai Chan and Kelham Island Concrete

For designer Lai Chan, it was important to convey the simplicity of love through this pebble-shaped piece, crafted in collaboration with British concrete manufacturer Kelham Island Concrete. The object exists as a memento, perfectly sculpted to fit into the hand of a loved one, reminding them of their relationship with the person who gifted it. 

Lai Chan
Fashion designer Lai Chan is best known for his subtle interpretations of the traditional Chinese cheongsam, but his output spans seasonal collections and costumes for television and theatre productions. With a commitment to quality and sustainability, he works closely with a team of skilled tailors. laichan.com (opens in new tab)

Kelham Island Concrete
Located in Sheffield, in the north of England, Kelham Island Concrete was founded by carpenter Oliver Miller. In 2017, furniture designer Conor Povall joined the team, and together the pair have developed the brand, taking on commissions ranging from worktops and furniture to interior design projects and sculptural works. kelhamislandconcrete.com (opens in new tab)

‘Molten Love’ ring by Amy Lau Design and John Pomp

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Molten Love’ ring
Amy Lau Design and John Pomp

Evoking a beating heart, a flower bloom or bonded human bodies, Amy Lau and John Pomp’s ‘Molten Love’ ring design is rooted in the natural world. Pomp drew inspiration from time spent in the slot canyons of Utah, where water carves through jagged rock formations, while Lau was inspired by the organic shapes of Jean Arp’s sculptures and Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings. At the centre of the ring is a piece of rose quartz, a stone chosen for its delicate colour, multi-tonal formations and ritualistic ties with the energy of love. The 18ct solid gold band envelopes and divides the form, channelling an infinite flowing river. 

Amy Lau Design
Interior designer Amy Lau founded her eponymous brand in 2001. It specialises in the creation of inviting spaces featuring a variety of natural materials. Aside from her vast portfolio of sophisticated residential interiors, Lau was also the co-founder of Design.05, the forerunner of the Design Miami fair. amylaudesign.com (opens in new tab)

John Pomp
Based in Fishtown, Philadelphia, and inspired by the beauty of the natural world, John Pomp’s studio creates contemporary, handcrafted furniture and lighting in four key materials: glass (which Pomp has been making for 25 years), metal, wood and leather. johnpomp.com (opens in new tab)

‘Wallflower’ by Hans Tan and Ethimo

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Wallflower’
Hans Tan and Ethimo

A wall vase for preserving dried flora, Hans Tan’s piece was inspired by the art of ikebana and by Baroque still-life paintings. The minimalist vase frames dried flora on the wall, providing a dark background to enhance shapes, textures and compositions. ‘Flowers are an expression of love in many forms: friendship, romance, remembrance, faith, appreciation, goodwill, encouragement,’ says Tan. Italian outdoor specialist Ethimo worked in close collaboration with the designer to execute the piece, using powder-coated aluminium, and here the vase is filled with a flower arrangement by Singapore-based botanical design studio Humid House. 

Hans Tan
Singapore-based designer Hans Tan combines product design with craft experiments, focusing on heritage, consumption and waste. His extensive ceramic work has received many international awards and been shown by museums and galleries globally, including New York’s Cooper Hewitt. hanstan.net (opens in new tab)

Ethimo
Italian company Ethimo specialises in high-quality outdoor furniture, inspired by the Mediterranean. It also collaborates with a host of celebrated designers, ranging from Ludovica + Roberto Palomba to Matteo Thun and Patrick Norguet. ethimo.com (opens in new tab)

‘Monolith’ table lamp by Paul Matter and Van Den Weghe

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Monolith’ table lamp
Paul Matter and Van Den Weghe

‘In India, the inner sexual energy of humanity is identified with cosmic energy, and images which represent the outward appearance of sexual energy are worshipped as its emblems,’ explains Nikhil Paul, founder of design studio Paul Matter. His lamp takes cues from the lingam, a monolithic object in temples and shrines that symbolises the phallus of Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction. Belgian stone purveyor Van Den Weghe has carved the lamp from a single block of white Carrara marble and integrated its signature Lapris touch technology, which allows the lamp to be turned on and off without a visible switch. ‘The design explores simple geometry that allows the light to interact with its surface and material. It’s as though the lamp is inviting the viewer to a ceremony, or simply a meditative experience.’ 

Paul Matter
This New Delhi-based studio specialises in lighting design with a minimalist aesthetic, taking its cues from midcentury modernism and the Industrial Age. It works closely with Indian master craftsmen to develop handmade products, often drawing from a palette of aged brass, copper and blown glass. paulmatter.com (opens in new tab)

Van Den Weghe
Based in Zulte in Belgium, Van Den Weghe is a purveyor of high-end natural stone that works in close collaboration with leading architects, designers and artists, including Glenn Sestig, Pierre Yovanovitch and Pieter Vermeersch. In addition to a repertoire that exceeds 600 kinds of stone, it is also the developer of Lapris, a system of sockets and switches that are completely integrated into natural stone, with no visual interruption. vandenweghe.be (opens in new tab)

Pair of stools by Annelise Michelson and Pimar

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Pair of stools’
Annelise Michelson and Pimar

According to the ancient Chinese principle of yin and yang, things that seem most contradictory can often be the most inseparable. For Annelise Michelson, this teaching reflects the twists and turns of a love story, which she has translated into a pair of stools. The stools are made from different colours of Lecce stone, a calcareous limestone from Italy’s Salento area. Through a carving process, they are shaped to curl into one another, appearing almost to become one. 

Annelise Michelson
Parisian jewellery designer Michelson began her career in fashion design, training at the city's Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture and going on to work for brands such as Vanessa Bruno, Paul & Joe, and Hermès. She now works on her bold collections from her atelier in the Marais. annelisemichelson.com (opens in new tab)

Pimar
The family-run company’s quarry extends over an area of 40 hectares in Salento, Puglia. Its Lecce stone has a calcareous consistency and is often patterned by fragments of fossils in tones of yellow, white and grey. pimarlimestone.com (opens in new tab)

The Ties that Bind ring series by Alexandra Jefford and Smythson

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘The Ties that Bind ring series’
Alexandra Jefford and Smythson

As ancient symbolism goes, few motifs resonate as powerfully as the humble knot. Whether in love, comradeship or political union, its simple form has represented togetherness since the earliest times. The jewelled ring is a refined form of the love knot that typically represents togetherness in the Western world, but we wanted to explore its broader global origins. Natural materials such as wool, grasses and leather were commonly used to create symbolic finger knots, and, as we teamed heritage British leather house Smythson with fine jeweller Alexandra Jefford, this is where our story began. For Handmade, the pair produced a unique series of five gold rings. Jefford has integrated precision-crafted knots of coloured Smythson leather to symbolise the unity that binds cultural traditions, from Celtic plaits and Egyptian door knots to the knot bindings on Japanese Samurai swords. 

Alexandra Jefford
From her ‘O’ series, featuring a Josef Albers font-inspired ring collection, to solo exhibitions, a constant interplay of art, craft and architectural discipline weaves through Alexandra Jefford’s jewellery design. She works mainly on a commission-only basis from her studio in Soho, London. alexandrajefford.com (opens in new tab)

Smythson
The luxury leather goods house famed for its lightweight, bound portable diaries, handbags and personalised pale-blue stationery has, in its 130 years, become one of the lasting names of great British craft tradition. Today, creative director Luc Goidadin is exploring Smythson’s colourful heritage and giving it a contemporary eye. smythson.com (opens in new tab)

‘PAL’ by Benjamin Hubert | Layer and Nio

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘PAL’
Benjamin Hubert | Layer and Nio

‘We believe that the future is autonomous and sustainable and it is important to create products that offer more convenience without inconveniencing the planet,’ says Benjamin Hubert, founder of London design studio Layer. Hubert and his team have joined forces with the Chinese electric vehicle manufacturer Nio to develop a near-future prototype of a planet-loving, congestion-busting urban get-about. ‘PAL’ is the smartest of electric scooters and incorporates AI and machine learning as well as a range of detachable luggage accessories. ‘PAL’ can be charged at home or in the boot of a Nio electric car and connects to Nomi, Nio’s AI-powered digital assistant, who can suggest convenient, traffic-light routes and, once familiar with your routine, take over navigation and steering duties entirely. 

Layer
Benjamin Hubert launched Layer in 2015. The studio works at the advanced edge of industrial and digital design. Its output includes wearables, 3D-knitted upholstery and ceramic charge trays, and its client list spans from Airbus through Moroso to Nike. layerdesign.com (opens in new tab)

Nio
Founded in 2014, Nio is leading the charge of Chinese electric car makers. Headquartered in Shanghai, it also has facilities and offices in London, Munich and San Jose. The company currently offers two premium electric SUVs, the ES6 and ES8, and holds the world speed record for an autonomous vehicle. nio.com (opens in new tab)

Treasure chest by Tiffany Loy and Alma Leather

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Treasure chest
Tiffany Loy and Alma Leather

When designer Tiffany Loy started thinking of the words used to talk about love, she noticed the word ‘treasure’ recurring as a term of endearment in many languages, from baobei in Chinese to Schatz in German. ‘I like the way “treasure” expresses love with a specific type of preciousness, that is private and intimate, something we wish to keep to ourselves, like a little secret kept between two people,’ she says. These observations were translated into a design for a treasure chest that can keep precious things concealed or open up to reveal them in all their glory. The chest, embellished with hundreds of tiny leather pieces courtesy of Alma Leather, is like love itself, says Loy. ‘It requires delicate handling, reveals surprising details and can contain infinite possibilities.’ 

Tiffany Loy
With a background combining industrial design and textiles, Loy’s focus lies in material applications, fabrication and exploration of future technologies. After setting up her studio in 2014, she has developed a vast body of work that has been shown in museums and galleries across Asia and Europe. She has also collaborated with brands such as Uniqlo and Singapore-based The Rug Maker on products and installations. tiffanyloy.com (opens in new tab)

Alma Leather
Alma Leather has been providing supplies for interiors, furniture, fashion and accessories since 1938. In the bustling heart of east London, the team works on projects ranging from small bespoke commissions to full residential refits. alma1938.com (opens in new tab)

‘Peep Show’ wallpapers by Michael Reynolds, Hoffman Creative, Flavor Paper and Tom of Finland Foundation

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Peep Show’ wallpapers
Michael Reynolds, Hoffman Creative, Flavor Paper and Tom of Finland Foundation

A collaboration two years in the making, ‘Peep Show’ comprises two monochrome wallpapers – one ‘PG-13’, one ‘X-Rated’. Conceived by Michael Reynolds and Hoffman Creative, the design combines archival illustrations by Tom of Finland with expert manufacturing by Flavor Paper. Peek through the hole and see for yourself: the view – highlighting Tom of Finland’s mastery of graphite and pencil – is an exciting celebration of sex, masculinity and liberation. 

Michael Reynolds
New York-based Michael Reynolds, Wallpaper* magazine’s US editor, is a creative director who works across disciplines and media as an editorial stylist, exhibition and set designer, advertising director, curator and consultant. michaelreynoldsnyc.com (opens in new tab)

Hoffman Creative
Founded by Eric Hoffman a decade ago, Hoffman Creative devises brand identities for a range of clients with an ethos rooted in psychology and emotional intelligence. hoffmancreative.com (opens in new tab)

Flavor Paper
Fifteen years ago, Jon Sherman revamped a defunct 1970s print studio, transforming it into a manufacturer of bespoke wall coverings. Today, it is celebrated for its mastery of large-format silkscreen printing. flavorpaper.com (opens in new tab)

Tom of Finland Foundation
Devoted to the ‘promotion and preservation of erotic art’, the Tom of Finland Foundation maintains the archive and former home of the 20th-century artist known for his graphic, highly stylised illustrations. The foundation continues to promote the artist’s significant influence on LGBT culture. tomoffinlandfoundation.org (opens in new tab)

‘Phoenix’ by Farsjad Farzankia and Brdr. Krüger

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Phoenix’
Farshad Farzankia and Brdr. Krüger

Made from broken wood pieces from furniture production at Brdr. Krüger’s workshop in Værløse, Denmark, ‘Phoenix’ is a sculpture in two parts – an elegantly curved bird, whose form nods to Danish design traditions (think Kay Bojesen’s animal figurines) as well as ancient Persian vessels (acknowledging Farzankia’s personal roots), supported by a rougher-hewn pedestal from the same material. Farzankia and Brdr. Krüger’s creative director Jonas Krüger were drawn to the idea of creating from residue. ‘There is some resemblance to the Japanese philosophy of kintsugi; you can see that what is abandoned can be resurrected,’ they say. ‘In the same way, people often need to have their heart broken before they can experience love again. Love is about pain and loss, but also creation and joy.’ 

Farshad Farzankia
Born in Tehran and based in Copenhagen, Farzankia is one of the brightest talents to have burst onto the Scandinavian art scene in recent years, drawing acclaim for his brightly coloured compositions of people, birds and domestic objects. He is represented by Andersen’s Contemporary in Copenhagen, Galerie Kornfeld in Berlin and Richard Heller Gallery in Los Angeles. farshadfarzankia.dk (opens in new tab)

Brdr. Krüger
Founded by Theodor and Ferdinand Krüger in 1886, this Danish family business has created functional, honest wooden furniture and objects over five generations. In recent years, Brdr. Krüger has evolved into a design brand, with furniture collections such as Arv (a collaboration with Studio David Thulstrup, initially for the new Noma) and Jari (with OEO Studio for Tokyo restaurant Inua). brdr-kruger.com (opens in new tab)

‘Skin Bricks’ by Sebastian Alberdi and Missana

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Skin Bricks’
Sebastian Alberdi and Missana

For Sebastian Alberdi, the sensation of skin touching skin is what springs to mind when he thinks of love. For his design, named ‘Skin Bricks’, he has worked alongside furniture company Missana to create hide-lined blocks that stack atop of one another, as a way of encouraging play. The soft leather is intended to create a sensual feeling in the hand of the holder, while also taking on marks and blemishes over time. 

Sebastian Alberdi
Originally from Buenos Aires, Sebastian Alberdi lives and works in Barcelona. As well as designing his own pieces, he is co-founder of design collective Outofstock, with whom he has worked alongside brands such as Ligne Roset and Blå Station. sebastianalberdi.com (opens in new tab)

Missana
Spanish furniture company Missana produces its designs from a workshop in the Valencian town of Alberic. In 2012, it underwent an extensive rebrand in order to modernise its offering, and has since worked alongside the likes of Masquespacio, Mut and Afroditi Krassa. missana.es (opens in new tab)

‘Spin the Bottle cabinet’ by Hanne Enemark and Amorim

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Spin the Bottle cabinet’
Hanne Enemark and Amorim

A game typically played at a house party with a discarded beer bottle, ‘Spin the Bottle’ has been significantly elevated by London glassblower Hanne Enemark and cork company Amorim. Enemark has handcrafted a custom bottle for the game, and designed a cork side table-cum-cabinet that has a specially shaped compartment within to store it ready for use. 

Hanne Enemark
A glass artist working in east London, Hanne Enemark graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2010, where she now returns as a guest lecturer. Enemark is also a founding member of Studio Manifold, a collaborative studio of glass and ceramic artists. hanneenemark.com (opens in new tab)

Amorim
Amorim’s origins date back to 1870, when founder António Alves Amorim opened a cork-stopper factory in Vila Nova de Gaia. Today, the company prides itself on being one of the world’s leading producers of cork products, providing material to industries as diverse as aeronautics, construction and wine production. amorim.com (opens in new tab)

Tandem bike by Paul Smith and Mercian

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Tandem bike
Paul Smith and Mercian

Cycling enthusiast Paul Smith celebrates the power of two with this tandem bicycle, designed in collaboration with Mercian. A convenient mode of transportation for couples, this frame is built to cater to Smith and his wife Pauline, using matt black Reynolds 531 tubing, with eye-catching stripes in his brand’s signature colours. 

Paul Smith
Nottingham-born Paul Smith founded his first clothing boutique in his home city in 1970. His men’s and women’s label has gone on to become of Britain’s most beloved brands. Smith is renowned for his vibrant and playful take on fashion, and an easy-going, collaborative mindset that sees him span the fields of art, interiors and design. paulsmith.com (opens in new tab)

Mercian
Derby-based bicycle manufacturer Mercian was founded in 1946. It specialises in touring and track bicycles, creating handmade custom designs in lightweight steel and stove enamel. Paul Smith owns several Mercian track bikes. merciancycles.co.uk (opens in new tab)

‘The Agreement’ by Nick Ross and Antoine Architectural FInishes

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘The Agreement’
Nick Ross and Antoine Architectural FInishes

Couples of any description are welcomed with open arms to join each other beneath this archway, designed by Nick Ross to celebrate the romanticism of marriage. With a limestone-like surface courtesy of Antoine Architectural Finishes, the structure stands confidently tall above the two lovers, while remaining modest in its form. Its narrow width encourages a moment of closeness. 

Nick Ross
Scottish industrial designer Nick Ross started his career in Rotterdam under artist Tomáš Gabzdil Libertíny, before moving to Sweden to work for Front. Upon leaving the company in 2010, he spent time as a tutor at Gray’s School of Art in Aberdeen, where he was inspired to further his own education. Having gained a master’s at Stockholm’s Konstfack, he set up his studio in the Swedish capital in 2014. nckrss.com (opens in new tab)

Antoine Architectural Finishes
The company uses environmentally friendly minerals and materials to create textured architectural finishes for built structures. Its main products are the Lime Structure, for a soft and matt finish, and the Clay Structure, for a grainy and tactile surface. antoinearchitecturalfinishes.com (opens in new tab)

‘The Bed’ by Elmgreen & Dragset and Georg Jensen

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘The Bed’
Elmgreen & Dragset and Georg Jensen

Noting that mobile devices, and the accompanying emails, alerts and social media activity, can interfere with in-person romantic interaction, Elmgreen & Dragset devised a designated vessel to contain two phones. ‘It’s an object that protects real-life intimacy, that protects lovers from the digital interferences around them,’ say the artists. The form, ‘like a futuristic Easter egg’, draws inspiration from a bonbonnière created by Georg Jensen in 1908. The fabric-lined interior has parallel indentations that allow a pair of phones to be placed side by side, as though in bed together. ‘The action of putting the phones to bed becomes a small ritual, symbolic of each partner agreeing to fully enter the situation of being together.’ The design was handmade by Georg Jensen’s silversmiths over two months and was accompanied by an installation in the entrance foyer of Wallpaper* Handmade X, also created by Elmgreen & Dragset and Georg Jensen.

Elmgreen & Dragset
Artists Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset take on themes as varied as consumerism, surveillance and love. Their installations have included a locked Prada store in the desert near Marfa, Texas, and an upright swimming pool (titled Van Gogh’s Ear) at New York’s Rockefeller Center. Their current show at the National Gallery of Denmark, juxtaposes the works of Vilhelm Hammershøi and international contemporary artists. elmgreen-dragset.com (opens in new tab)

Georg Jensen
Founded by silversmith Georg Jensen in 1904, the leading Scandinavian design brand continues to produce handmade silver holloware from its Copenhagen workshop (where each piece is hammered into form, without the use of moulds), alongside jewellery, watches and stainless steel home products. Its collaborators range from Henning Koppel to Kelly Wearstler. georgjensen.com (opens in new tab)

G 046 Wallpaper Handmade Press Shot 2019

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Germans Ermičs and Bang & Olufsen

Designer Germans Ermičs has explored his love of music through this interactive sound sculpture designed in collaboration with Bang & Olufsen. Crafted from anodised aluminium, the piece presents a visual representation of the ‘circle of fifths’ musical theory, whereby the 12 tones on the chromatic musical scale are examined in relation to one another. As visitors move their hand around the sculpture, proximity sensors pick up on their presence and produce harmonious notes in turn. 

Germans Ermičs
Germans Ermičs operates his design studio out of Amsterdam, but was born in Riga, Latvia. His work in furniture calls on his experience as a graphic designer –resulting in bold, clean statement pieces that straddle art and design. germansermics.com (opens in new tab)

Bang & Olufsen
Denmark’s Bang & Olufsen is a high-end consumer electronics company specialising in sound products, televisions and telephones. Its sleek aesthetic and collaborations with the likes of Michael Anastassiades and Cecilie Manz have made the company a firm favourite among design aficionados. bang-olufsen.com (opens in new tab)

Handmade X: With Love, the projects

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘The Future of Love’ potions
Nadja Zerunian, Saint Charles Apothecary and Lobmeyr

Fascinated by research that suggests that drugs can be used to modulate love, Nadja Zerunian has conceived a physical and pharmaceutical representation of three building blocks of love: lust, attraction and attachment. With the help of crystal glass specialist Lobmeyr, Zerunian has created three crystal receptacles, while corresponding miniature utensils were fashioned in gold-plated copper by Rome-based artisan Victor Clopotar and Viennese metal craftsman Martin Hufnagl. Alexander Ehrmann of Vienna’s Saint Charles Apothecary meanwhile developed the matching potions: ‘Lust’ is an ingestible powder from clary sage, parsley, arginine and saffron; ‘Attraction’ is a liquid made from yohimbine, ginseng and maca; ‘Attachment’ is a wearable concoction from bergamot, jasmine, rose, sandalwood and ambergris. 

Nadja Zerunian
Austrian designer Nadja Zerunian worked for Calvin Klein, Georg Jensen and the Swatch Group before shifting her focus to work directly with master craftsmen all over Europe to create special-edition projects that throw light on local crafts. nadjazerunian.com (opens in new tab)

Saint Charles Apothecary
A sixth-generation chemist, Alexander Ehrmann has been managing Vienna’s renowned Saint Charles Apothecary since 2006, combining tradition with modern pharmacology to produce a range of natural remedies, cosmetics and health supplements. saint-charles.eu (opens in new tab)

Lobmeyr
Founded in 1823 by Joseph Lobmeyr, this Viennese glass manufacturer has a long and illustrious history. Its collaborators include Thomas Edison, Josef Hoffmann and, more recently, Matteo Thun and Ted Muehling. lobmeyr.at (opens in new tab)

Handmade X: With Love, the projects

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Tower of X’
Johnston Marklee, Smile Plastics and Materialise Creative Design

An architectural totem of love, the ‘Tower of X’ (or Tower of Love) was designed by architects Johnston Marklee, paying homage to works from art and design history, including the output of Robert Smithson, Sol LeWitt and Richard Artschwager. Created as a stack of irregularly shaped geometric volumes, the tower can be disassembled into separate seating elements, to encourage chance encounters. The piece is clad in sleek Smile Plastics surfaces, featuring an eye-catching, black-and-white striped pattern, cut to size and assembled by Materialise Creative Design. 

Johnston Marklee
Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee founded their architecture practice in Los Angeles in 1998. The internationally acclaimed studio has won numerous awards and completed highly praised projects, such as the Menil Drawing Institute in Houston and Vault House in Southern California, in its distinctive, clean and modern style. johnstonmarklee.com (opens in new tab)

Smile Plastics
Smile Plastics specialises in handcrafted decorative panels made out of waste materials, for use in the architecture and design industries. The British company offers a variety of surfaces featuring recycled elements, and also creates custom designs for bespoke projects. smile-plastics.com (opens in new tab)

Materialise Creative Design
An experienced fabricator, designer and installation expert, Materialise Creative Design has a passion for material R&D and project management. It leads a wide range of creative projects from its UK base in Buckinghamshire. materialisecreativedesign.co.uk (opens in new tab)

Handmade X: With Love, the projects

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

Uniforms
Palmer//Harding and Volga Linen

Love’s most universal symbol, the heart, takes centre stage in Palmer//Harding and Volga’s unisex shirt design, imagined in elegant lightweight linen. An oversized heart shape is incorporated into the construction of the shirt’s back. To offset the motif’s kitsch qualities, the silhouette has been imagined in a neutral colour palette and with an androgynous cut. 

Palmer//Harding
Central Saint Martins alumni Levi Palmer and Matthew Harding launched their eponymous womenswear label in 2012. Having become synonymous with exquisite shirting and innovative pattern-cutting and draping techniques, this year the label has also expanded into menswear. palmerharding.com (opens in new tab)

Volga Linen
Theresa Tollemache launched Volga Linen in 1995. Specialising in the environmentally friendly fabric, imported from Europe and Russia, the Suffolk-based brand offers fabric by the metre, table linen, bed linen and ready-to-hang curtains. volgalinen.co.uk (opens in new tab)

Handmade X: With Love, the projects

(Image credit: Alberto Strada)

‘Three Isles’ birdbaths
Teo Yang Studio and Huguet

Drawing on Korea’s 2,000-year heritage in garden design – which combines symbols and influences from different Asian traditions into landscapes that celebrate life and the beauty of nature – Teo Yang Studio has created a trio of birdbaths (the number three being a powerful symbol in Korean culture). Titled ‘Isle 1’, ‘Isle 2’ and ‘Isle 3’, the sculptural pieces were expertly produced by Spanish terrazzo and cement surface company Huguet using its Banyalbufar Terrazzo and Cuino Mallorca ranges. 

Teo Yang Studio
Teo Yang’s sophisticated work combines a global approach and the design legacy of his home country of South Korea. From his Seoul base, the architect specialises in high-end residential, branding and commercial projects that mix modernity and tradition. teoyangstudio.com (opens in new tab)

Huguet
Based in Mallorca, Huguet has been manufacturing hydraulic floor tiles and terrazzo items since 1933. Today, it is known for its bespoke collections in collaboration with leading architects and designers, among them Herzog & de Meuron, David Chipperfield and Alfredo Häberli. huguetmallorca.com (opens in new tab)

Rosa Bertoli was born in Udine, Italy, and now lives in London. Since 2014, she has been the Design Editor of Wallpaper*, where she oversees design content for the print and online editions, as well as special editorial projects. Through her role at Wallpaper*, she has written extensively about all areas of design. Rosa has been speaker and moderator for various design talks and conferences including London Craft Week, Maison & Objet, The Italian Cultural Institute (London), Clippings, Zaha Hadid Design, Kartell and Frieze Art Fair. Rosa has been on judging panels for the Chart Architecture Award, the Dutch Design Awards and the DesignGuild Marks. She has written for numerous English and Italian language publications, and worked as a content and communication consultant for fashion and design brands.