Carl Hansen & Søn opens new minimalist Stockholm flagship

Carl Hansen & Søn opens new minimalist Stockholm flagship

As part of its international expansion, Danish furniture manufacturer Carl Hansen & Søn has opened a new 350 sq m flagship store in the Östermalm area of Stockholm, which is becoming a hub for high-end design companies.

The space, a former bank, has been completely transformed by Vasco Trigueiros from design duo Trigueiros Architecture. Concrete columns have a new, spiky terracotta finish. A flat wall has been given a wavy structure. And the typical dark, gloomy bank interior (including thick concrete walls protecting the vaults and lowered ceilings) is now a light and airy space. ‘This has been achieved, among other things, by working with open surfaces and transparency, as well as with architectural elements such as columns and extraordinarily high ceilings,’ Trigueiros explains.

Several impressive skylights highlight the many design classics on show, including the ‘Wishbone’ chair by Hans Wegner and the ‘Colonial’ line by Ole Wanscher. Other impressive updates abound too, including Arne Jacobsen’s ‘Society Table’ – originally designed in 1952 as a gift for the American-Scandinavian Foundation in New York – as well as the ‘PK1’ wicker chair by Poul Kjærholm, from 1955. 

The new Carl Hansen flagship store in Stockholm

The new Carl Hansen & Søn flagship store in Stockholm. Photography: Ben Anders

Although grand in size, the space is neutral in personality, and sticks to a paired-down colour scheme. ‘We wanted to bring in a reflection of Stockholm, known for its minimalist and functional design. The furniture should have focal point,’ says Knud Erik Hansen, the company’s CEO and third-generation owner.

In a digital era, he highlights the importance of a physical space where people can touch and feel the products before ordering them online. The store is divided into two areas – one offering inspiration for the home and the other targeted at a professional clientele. ‘This space should not be about hard selling, it is a way for people to discover our unique heritage,’ says Hansen.

Every step is a reminder of fine, Danish craftsmanship. For instance, a solid Dinesen Douglas floor stretches across the showroom; almost floating into it is a shiny concrete tier. It’s a nice nod to the outside neighbourhood, where 100-year-old tree trunks stand tall alongside the gravel-covered esplanade.