Urban oasis: Isay Weinfeld unveils Jardim, his first residential project in New York

Brazilian architect Isay Weinfeld has unveiled his plans for Jardim, his first residential project in New York City
(Image credit: Press)

New York City’s Chelsea neighbourhood is surely close to bursting at the seams. With a slew of residential projects concentrating around the High Line all simultaneously in the works, it’s a wonder that the area’s street grid has been able to absorb the number of high-profile developments it already has.

That said, one project that we’re grateful there is still room for is Jardim, an otherworldly two tower building on West 27th Street, designed by the Brazilian architect Isay Weinfeld (opens in new tab). Boasting the same monumentality of Weinfeld’s other projects, albeit in a more urban form, Jardim cuts a striking figure with its private driveway, ample gardens and simple, monolithic structure that creates a distinct break from its surroundings.

Rendered mostly in brick and concrete, Jardim’s warm, tactile appearance is enhanced by the addition of latticed wood screens and a generously planted second-floor terrace that envelops the site.

‘In the beginning, we tried to play a little bit with the volumes because there were many specific rules and restrictions of where volumes could be recessed, or where building on the line of the site could take place,’ Weinfeld explains about the decision to have two buildings instead of just one. ‘Together, we tried to make many adjustments until we found a good resolution for the site.’

Rather than feeling squeezed in, the presence of two buildings (each 11 stories tall) with the resulting negative space creates a sense of movement that counteracts the neighbourhood’s density, a shrewd and commendable move by Weinfeld and Jardim’s developers, Centaur Properties and Greyscale Development Group. (Zaha Hadid’s 520 West 28th Street (opens in new tab) building will eventually loom next door.)

At almost every juncture, Jardim displays a graceful sense of restraint that imbues the spaces with a quiet dramatic tension. The driveway – an artful tunnel made from bricks – stretches through the site to connect 27th and 28th streets. Glass skylights in the terrace allow natural light to filter through to the residence’s swimming pool and gymnasium below. The apartments themselves are an elegant mix of smoked oak, marble, brass and limestone, for which panoramic windows looking out onto Manhattan provide the perfect backdrop.

‘This isn’t a kind of architecture that shouts, it’s an architecture that speaks low. I try to conduct people through the spaces, like a movie. You hope that people feel something from their proportions,’ Weinfeld muses. ‘What is very important for me is to have a very well-designed plan. For me, the function of a project is very important. It’s not a question of beauty. The building has to work to make sense.’

Already two years in the making, Jardim marks Weinfeld’s first residential development in New York City and will complete in 2017. Why not any earlier? ‘I was waiting for a call,’ the seasoned architect quips.

An olden house.

Jardim cuts a striking figure with a private driveway that runs through the block, ample gardens and simple, monolithic structure that creates a distinct break from its surroundings

(Image credit: Press)

The building is a warm

The building is a warm mix of materials. Latticed wood screens separate the driveway from the minimalist reception desk and a granite spiral staircase

(Image credit: Press)

The building's elegant

The building's elegant swimming pool is flooded with natural light, thanks to four skylights 

(Image credit: Press)

Panoramic windows

Panoramic windows provide the perfect backdrop in the apartments, which elegantly mix smoked oak, marble, brass and limestone accents

(Image credit: Press)

The kitchen

In the kitchen, Gaggeneau appliances are complemented by light oak cabinetry

(Image credit: Press)

Bathrooms are equipped with lava stone

Jardim's master bathrooms are equipped with lava stone counter tops, grooved wood vanities and lacquered brass fixtures. All interior accents have been selected by Weinfeld

(Image credit: Press)

The spaces, like a movie.

‘This isn’t a kind of architecture that shouts, it’s an architecture that speaks low. I try to conduct people through the spaces, like a movie. You hope that people feel something from their proportions,’ Weinfeld muses

(Image credit: Press)

INFORMATION

For more information, please visit the Jardim website (opens in new tab)

ADDRESS

Jardim
527 West 27th Street
New York, New York

VIEW GOOGLE MAPS (opens in new tab)

Pei-Ru Keh is the US Editor at Wallpaper*. Born and raised in Singapore, she has been a New Yorker since 2013. Pei-Ru has held various titles at Wallpaper* since she joined in 2007. She currently reports on design, art, architecture, fashion, beauty and lifestyle happenings in the United States, both in print and digitally. Pei-Ru has taken a key role in championing diversity and representation within Wallpaper's content pillars and actively seeks out stories that reflect a wide range of perspectives. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two children, and is currently learning how to drive.