The five finalists for the 2017 Mies van der Rohe Award announced

The five finalists for the 2017 Mies van der Rohe Award announced
The finalists of the 2017 Mies van der Rohe Award includes Bandol-based Rudy Ricciotti, for his Rivesaltes Memorial Museum in France.
(Image credit: Kevin Dolmaire)

Five finalists have been announced for the biannual European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award. Championing creativity and collaboration in architecture across the EU, the prize, run by the European Commission and the Fundació Mies van der Rohe, celebrates excellence in European architecture across the areas of conception, design and construction.

The judges whittled down a shortlist of 40 nominees, selecting: deFlat Kleiburg in Amsterdam by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur; Ely Court in London by Alison Brooks Architects; Kannikegården in Ribe by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects; Katyn Museum in Warsaw by Jan Belina Brzozowski and Konrad Grabowiecki with BBGK Architekci; and Rivesaltes Memorial Museum by Rudy Ricciotti.

The five finalists for the 2017 Mies van der Rohe Award announced

The Kannikegården in Ribe, Denmark, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects

(Image credit: Anders Sune Berg)

On the selection of the finalists, architect and chairman of the jury Stephen Bates said, ‘Our instincts could be summed up by the words of Peter Smithson: “Things need to be ordinary and heroic at the same time”. We were looking for an ordinariness whose understated lyricism is full of potential.’

Whether located at the heart of a town, submerged into a landscape or found in the suburbs of a city, the five selected buildings show a range of styles and purposes, yet also many structural similarities and also a mutual interest in community, suggesting the shared cultural and social values of the EU countries. The prize is a credit to the industry of architecture, which is at the forefront of successful economic and creative exchange across borders, communities and continents.

The Jury will visit the buildings in April and then the winner and the emerging architect winner will be announced in Brussels in May, with the award ceremony taking place at the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion.

The five finalists for the 2017 Mies van der Rohe Award announced

The Rivesaltes Memorial Museum by Rudy Ricciotti

(Image credit: Kevin Dolmaire)

Kannikegården in Ribe, Denmark’s best preserved medieval city

Kannikegården in Ribe, Denmark’s best preserved medieval city, is designed by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects

(Image credit: Anders Sune Berg)

The Katyn Museum by Jan Belina Brzozowski and Konrad Grabowiecki with BBGK Architekci, Warsaw

The Katyn Museum by Jan Belina Brzozowski and Konrad Grabowiecki with BBGK Architekci, Warsaw

(Image credit: Juliusz Sokołowski)

The Katyn Museum by Jan Belina Brzozowski and Konrad Grabowiecki with BBGK Architekci, Warsaw

The Katyn Museum by Jan Belina Brzozowski and Konrad Grabowiecki with BBGK Architekci, Warsaw

(Image credit: Juliusz Sokołowski)

DeFlat Kleiburg by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur, Amsterdam

DeFlat Kleiburg by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur, Amsterdam

(Image credit: StijnSpoelstra)

DeFlat Kleiburg by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur, Amsterdam

DeFlat Kleiburg by NL Architects and XVW Architectuur, Amsterdam

(Image credit: StijnSpoelstra)

Ely Court by Alison Brooks Architects, London

Ely Court by Alison Brooks Architects, London

(Image credit: Paul Riddle     )

INFORMATION

For more information, visit the EU Mies Award website (opens in new tab)

Harriet Thorpe is a writer, journalist and editor covering architecture, design and culture, with particular interest in sustainability, 20th-century architecture and community. After studying History of Art at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and Journalism at City University in London, she developed her interest in architecture working at Wallpaper* magazine and today contributes to Wallpaper*, The World of Interiors and Icon magazine, amongst other titles. She is author of The Sustainable City (2022, Hoxton Mini Press), a book about sustainable architecture in London, and the Modern Cambridge Map (2023, Blue Crow Media), a map of 20th-century architecture in Cambridge, the city where she grew up.