Veronique Branquinho

Belgian designer Veronique Branquinho has returned to the catwalk after a three-year hiatus. Her comeback collection - an elegant, feminine take on Spring dressing - was worth the wait. She opened the show with a full-length nude dress with an iridescent layer of rose gold, and the same nude and peach tones proved the dominant colour narrative for the first half of the collection. The second half saw a familiar Branquinho touch: the push and pull between masculine and feminine. With a palette of moss green, navy blue, black and white, Branquinho brought out pantsuits and trousers paired with shirts, which were then softened with oversized arm sleeves or shrouded in wispy chiffon. Layers of billowy silk fabric - skillfully gathered, pleated and manipulated on the nude-toned goddess gowns - wafted gracefully, giving outfits the lightest of touches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Veronique Branquinho

Belgian designer Veronique Branquinho has returned to the catwalk after a three-year hiatus. Her comeback collection - an elegant, feminine take on Spring dressing - was worth the wait. She opened the show with a full-length nude dress with an iridescent layer of rose gold, and the same nude and peach tones proved the dominant colour narrative for the first half of the collection. The second half saw a familiar Branquinho touch: the push and pull between masculine and feminine. With a palette of moss green, navy blue, black and white, Branquinho brought out pantsuits and trousers paired with shirts, which were then softened with oversized arm sleeves or shrouded in wispy chiffon. Layers of billowy silk fabric - skillfully gathered, pleated and manipulated on the nude-toned goddess gowns - wafted gracefully, giving outfits the lightest of touches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Veronique Branquinho

Belgian designer Veronique Branquinho has returned to the catwalk after a three-year hiatus. Her comeback collection - an elegant, feminine take on Spring dressing - was worth the wait. She opened the show with a full-length nude dress with an iridescent layer of rose gold, and the same nude and peach tones proved the dominant colour narrative for the first half of the collection. The second half saw a familiar Branquinho touch: the push and pull between masculine and feminine. With a palette of moss green, navy blue, black and white, Branquinho brought out pantsuits and trousers paired with shirts, which were then softened with oversized arm sleeves or shrouded in wispy chiffon. Layers of billowy silk fabric - skillfully gathered, pleated and manipulated on the nude-toned goddess gowns - wafted gracefully, giving outfits the lightest of touches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

 

Veronique Branquinho

Belgian designer Veronique Branquinho has returned to the catwalk after a three-year hiatus. Her comeback collection - an elegant, feminine take on Spring dressing - was worth the wait. She opened the show with a full-length nude dress with an iridescent layer of rose gold, and the same nude and peach tones proved the dominant colour narrative for the first half of the collection. The second half saw a familiar Branquinho touch: the push and pull between masculine and feminine. With a palette of moss green, navy blue, black and white, Branquinho brought out pantsuits and trousers paired with shirts, which were then softened with oversized arm sleeves or shrouded in wispy chiffon. Layers of billowy silk fabric - skillfully gathered, pleated and manipulated on the nude-toned goddess gowns - wafted gracefully, giving outfits the lightest of touches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Veronique Branquinho

Belgian designer Veronique Branquinho has returned to the catwalk after a three-year hiatus. Her comeback collection - an elegant, feminine take on Spring dressing - was worth the wait. She opened the show with a full-length nude dress with an iridescent layer of rose gold, and the same nude and peach tones proved the dominant colour narrative for the first half of the collection. The second half saw a familiar Branquinho touch: the push and pull between masculine and feminine. With a palette of moss green, navy blue, black and white, Branquinho brought out pantsuits and trousers paired with shirts, which were then softened with oversized arm sleeves or shrouded in wispy chiffon. Layers of billowy silk fabric - skillfully gathered, pleated and manipulated on the nude-toned goddess gowns - wafted gracefully, giving outfits the lightest of touches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Anthony Vaccarello

No stranger to the idea of barely-there dressing for girls with zero cellulite and even less inhibitions, Anthony Vaccarello is fashion’s proponent of the outrageously small outfit. This season, his super-short and super-sexy dresses and skirts were asymmetrically slashed and then decorated with zips – which even went all the way round some waistlines, as Spring’s alternative to the humble belt. Trousers were wide-legged and fluid, but they too were paired with flesh-baring bandeau tops. A striking turquoise iridescent pantsuit refreshingly broke the spell of the mostly monochromatic palette, but the biggest talking point came when the designer closed the show with what is fast becoming the Vaccarello signature: a black, floor-grazing gown, cut with a thigh slit so high that the hip bone was completely revealed.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Anthony Vaccarello

No stranger to the idea of barely-there dressing for girls with zero cellulite and even less inhibitions, Anthony Vaccarello is fashion’s proponent of the outrageously small outfit. This season, his super-short and super-sexy dresses and skirts were asymmetrically slashed and then decorated with zips – which even went all the way round some waistlines, as Spring’s alternative to the humble belt. Trousers were wide-legged and fluid, but they too were paired with flesh-baring bandeau tops. A striking turquoise iridescent pantsuit refreshingly broke the spell of the mostly monochromatic palette, but the biggest talking point came when the designer closed the show with what is fast becoming the Vaccarello signature: a black, floor-grazing gown, cut with a thigh slit so high that the hip bone was completely revealed.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Anthony Vaccarello

No stranger to the idea of barely-there dressing for girls with zero cellulite and even less inhibitions, Anthony Vaccarello is fashion’s proponent of the outrageously small outfit. This season, his super-short and super-sexy dresses and skirts were asymmetrically slashed and then decorated with zips – which even went all the way round some waistlines, as Spring’s alternative to the humble belt. Trousers were wide-legged and fluid, but they too were paired with flesh-baring bandeau tops. A striking turquoise iridescent pantsuit refreshingly broke the spell of the mostly monochromatic palette, but the biggest talking point came when the designer closed the show with what is fast becoming the Vaccarello signature: a black, floor-grazing gown, cut with a thigh slit so high that the hip bone was completely revealed.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Anthony Vaccarello

No stranger to the idea of barely-there dressing for girls with zero cellulite and even less inhibitions, Anthony Vaccarello is fashion’s proponent of the outrageously small outfit. This season, his super-short and super-sexy dresses and skirts were asymmetrically slashed and then decorated with zips – which even went all the way round some waistlines, as Spring’s alternative to the humble belt. Trousers were wide-legged and fluid, but they too were paired with flesh-baring bandeau tops. A striking turquoise iridescent pantsuit refreshingly broke the spell of the mostly monochromatic palette, but the biggest talking point came when the designer closed the show with what is fast becoming the Vaccarello signature: a black, floor-grazing gown, cut with a thigh slit so high that the hip bone was completely revealed.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Anthony Vaccarello

No stranger to the idea of barely-there dressing for girls with zero cellulite and even less inhibitions, Anthony Vaccarello is fashion’s proponent of the outrageously small outfit. This season, his super-short and super-sexy dresses and skirts were asymmetrically slashed and then decorated with zips – which even went all the way round some waistlines, as Spring’s alternative to the humble belt. Trousers were wide-legged and fluid, but they too were paired with flesh-baring bandeau tops. A striking turquoise iridescent pantsuit refreshingly broke the spell of the mostly monochromatic palette, but the biggest talking point came when the designer closed the show with what is fast becoming the Vaccarello signature: a black, floor-grazing gown, cut with a thigh slit so high that the hip bone was completely revealed.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

Remember the tartan that made a fleeting appearance in Dries Van Noten's menswear collection earlier this year? Well, the classic check pattern was back in force for his Spring Women's presentation. Appearing on all manner of fabrics, from floaty mousseline silk to crisp taffeta, it was juxtaposed with a feminine floral motif - a brilliant conceit that Van Noten played with throughout the collection. Clearly, clashing patterns are the only look to be sporting this Spring. The master of print's leitmotif was the play between masculine and feminine, and the collection was very much for girls who like to look like boys (but also like to look like girls). Think a belted pyjama robe, or a billowing floor-length dress embellished with appliqué flowers worn over plaid trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

Remember the tartan that made a fleeting appearance in Dries Van Noten's menswear collection earlier this year? Well, the classic check pattern was back in force for his Spring Women's presentation. Appearing on all manner of fabrics, from floaty mousseline silk to crisp taffeta, it was juxtaposed with a feminine floral motif - a brilliant conceit that Van Noten played with throughout the collection. Clearly, clashing patterns are the only look to be sporting this Spring. The master of print's leitmotif was the play between masculine and feminine, and the collection was very much for girls who like to look like boys (but also like to look like girls). Think a belted pyjama robe, or a billowing floor-length dress embellished with appliqué flowers worn over plaid trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

Remember the tartan that made a fleeting appearance in Dries Van Noten's menswear collection earlier this year? Well, the classic check pattern was back in force for his Spring Women's presentation. Appearing on all manner of fabrics, from floaty mousseline silk to crisp taffeta, it was juxtaposed with a feminine floral motif - a brilliant conceit that Van Noten played with throughout the collection. Clearly, clashing patterns are the only look to be sporting this Spring. The master of print's leitmotif was the play between masculine and feminine, and the collection was very much for girls who like to look like boys (but also like to look like girls). Think a belted pyjama robe, or a billowing floor-length dress embellished with appliqué flowers worn over plaid trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

Remember the tartan that made a fleeting appearance in Dries Van Noten's menswear collection earlier this year? Well, the classic check pattern was back in force for his Spring Women's presentation. Appearing on all manner of fabrics, from floaty mousseline silk to crisp taffeta, it was juxtaposed with a feminine floral motif - a brilliant conceit that Van Noten played with throughout the collection. Clearly, clashing patterns are the only look to be sporting this Spring. The master of print's leitmotif was the play between masculine and feminine, and the collection was very much for girls who like to look like boys (but also like to look like girls). Think a belted pyjama robe, or a billowing floor-length dress embellished with appliqué flowers worn over plaid trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Dries Van Noten

Remember the tartan that made a fleeting appearance in Dries Van Noten's menswear collection earlier this year? Well, the classic check pattern was back in force for his Spring Women's presentation. Appearing on all manner of fabrics, from floaty mousseline silk to crisp taffeta, it was juxtaposed with a feminine floral motif - a brilliant conceit that Van Noten played with throughout the collection. Clearly, clashing patterns are the only look to be sporting this Spring. The master of print's leitmotif was the play between masculine and feminine, and the collection was very much for girls who like to look like boys (but also like to look like girls). Think a belted pyjama robe, or a billowing floor-length dress embellished with appliqué flowers worn over plaid trousers.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Rochas
 
Sculpted shirt dresses, crisp cottons, nipped-waist gilets and white leather wrestling boots - there is no doubt that creative director Marco Zanini is pushing a bit of a sportswear vibe this season. But while we've seen this aesthetic in abundance for Spring, in Zanini's hands it took an almost romantic turn. Outfits were softened with a feminine touch; like the 'sun visor', which in this case was fastened at the back of the head with blowsy floral Lemarié corsages, or the sporty tops paired with a silk skirt or a pleated chiffon, full-length number. A cotton shirt dress was cut to billow out and drape right to the floor - a youthful, if odd proposition, steeped in classic Zanini wit. Best in show, was the charming chrysanthemum print, which appeared in lavender and deep red on whimsical hoop-skirt dresses, coats and the 1950s-esque swimwear and corsets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Rochas
 
Sculpted shirt dresses, crisp cottons, nipped-waist gilets and white leather wrestling boots - there is no doubt that creative director Marco Zanini is pushing a bit of a sportswear vibe this season. But while we've seen this aesthetic in abundance for Spring, in Zanini's hands it took an almost romantic turn. Outfits were softened with a feminine touch; like the 'sun visor', which in this case was fastened at the back of the head with blowsy floral Lemarié corsages, or the sporty tops paired with a silk skirt or a pleated chiffon, full-length number. A cotton shirt dress was cut to billow out and drape right to the floor - a youthful, if odd proposition, steeped in classic Zanini wit. Best in show, was the charming chrysanthemum print, which appeared in lavender and deep red on whimsical hoop-skirt dresses, coats and the 1950s-esque swimwear and corsets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Rochas
 
Sculpted shirt dresses, crisp cottons, nipped-waist gilets and white leather wrestling boots - there is no doubt that creative director Marco Zanini is pushing a bit of a sportswear vibe this season. But while we've seen this aesthetic in abundance for Spring, in Zanini's hands it took an almost romantic turn. Outfits were softened with a feminine touch; like the 'sun visor', which in this case was fastened at the back of the head with blowsy floral Lemarié corsages, or the sporty tops paired with a silk skirt or a pleated chiffon, full-length number. A cotton shirt dress was cut to billow out and drape right to the floor - a youthful, if odd proposition, steeped in classic Zanini wit. Best in show, was the charming chrysanthemum print, which appeared in lavender and deep red on whimsical hoop-skirt dresses, coats and the 1950s-esque swimwear and corsets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Rochas
 
Sculpted shirt dresses, crisp cottons, nipped-waist gilets and white leather wrestling boots - there is no doubt that creative director Marco Zanini is pushing a bit of a sportswear vibe this season. But while we've seen this aesthetic in abundance for Spring, in Zanini's hands it took an almost romantic turn. Outfits were softened with a feminine touch; like the 'sun visor', which in this case was fastened at the back of the head with blowsy floral Lemarié corsages, or the sporty tops paired with a silk skirt or a pleated chiffon, full-length number. A cotton shirt dress was cut to billow out and drape right to the floor - a youthful, if odd proposition, steeped in classic Zanini wit. Best in show, was the charming chrysanthemum print, which appeared in lavender and deep red on whimsical hoop-skirt dresses, coats and the 1950s-esque swimwear and corsets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Rochas
 
Sculpted shirt dresses, crisp cottons, nipped-waist gilets and white leather wrestling boots - there is no doubt that creative director Marco Zanini is pushing a bit of a sportswear vibe this season. But while we've seen this aesthetic in abundance for Spring, in Zanini's hands it took an almost romantic turn. Outfits were softened with a feminine touch; like the 'sun visor', which in this case was fastened at the back of the head with blowsy floral Lemarié corsages, or the sporty tops paired with a silk skirt or a pleated chiffon, full-length number. A cotton shirt dress was cut to billow out and drape right to the floor - a youthful, if odd proposition, steeped in classic Zanini wit. Best in show, was the charming chrysanthemum print, which appeared in lavender and deep red on whimsical hoop-skirt dresses, coats and the 1950s-esque swimwear and corsets.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael

Balmain

It is hard to believe that the superbly straight-laced Monsieur Pierre Balmain ever envisioned his designs being associated with the likes of rich skin-baring rockstars who probably live in Moscow. But they do. And even more shockingly, the formula of haute hotness works.  The 'petites-mains' at Balmain's Parisian ateliers went all out this season, weaving intricate metallic thread embroideries in wicker patterns and rows of giant jet beading that looked like train tracks chugging along the contours of the body. The jackets had sharp-shouldered attitude, the skirts were rigid wisps of leather that barely covered the models buns. But our favourite was a dress that looked like a walking wicker table.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

It is hard to believe that the superbly straight-laced Monsieur Pierre Balmain ever envisioned his designs being associated with the likes of rich skin-baring rockstars who probably live in Moscow. But they do. And even more shockingly, the formula of haute hotness works.  The 'petites-mains' at Balmain's Parisian ateliers went all out this season, weaving intricate metallic thread embroideries in wicker patterns and rows of giant jet beading that looked like train tracks chugging along the contours of the body. The jackets had sharp-shouldered attitude, the skirts were rigid wisps of leather that barely covered the models buns. But our favourite was a dress that looked like a walking wicker table.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

It is hard to believe that the superbly straight-laced Monsieur Pierre Balmain ever envisioned his designs being associated with the likes of rich skin-baring rockstars who probably live in Moscow. But they do. And even more shockingly, the formula of haute hotness works.  The 'petites-mains' at Balmain's Parisian ateliers went all out this season, weaving intricate metallic thread embroideries in wicker patterns and rows of giant jet beading that looked like train tracks chugging along the contours of the body. The jackets had sharp-shouldered attitude, the skirts were rigid wisps of leather that barely covered the models buns. But our favourite was a dress that looked like a walking wicker table.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

It is hard to believe that the superbly straight-laced Monsieur Pierre Balmain ever envisioned his designs being associated with the likes of rich skin-baring rockstars who probably live in Moscow. But they do. And even more shockingly, the formula of haute hotness works.  The 'petites-mains' at Balmain's Parisian ateliers went all out this season, weaving intricate metallic thread embroideries in wicker patterns and rows of giant jet beading that looked like train tracks chugging along the contours of the body. The jackets had sharp-shouldered attitude, the skirts were rigid wisps of leather that barely covered the models buns. But our favourite was a dress that looked like a walking wicker table.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Balmain

It is hard to believe that the superbly straight-laced Monsieur Pierre Balmain ever envisioned his designs being associated with the likes of rich skin-baring rockstars who probably live in Moscow. But they do. And even more shockingly, the formula of haute hotness works.  The 'petites-mains' at Balmain's Parisian ateliers went all out this season, weaving intricate metallic thread embroideries in wicker patterns and rows of giant jet beading that looked like train tracks chugging along the contours of the body. The jackets had sharp-shouldered attitude, the skirts were rigid wisps of leather that barely covered the models buns. But our favourite was a dress that looked like a walking wicker table.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

The best grooming effect we've seen all season, the hair at Rick Owens was cut into sharply flared wedges - the models' hair possessing the structure and density of manicured garden hedges. While a stiff, angular construction dominated the cuts above the neck, there was a diametrically opposing flowing force below it. Owens' fashion silhouette this season was, as ever, presented with razor precision:  a loosened column dress whose length was exaggerated with delicate layers of sheer veiling or crinkled silk. He used otherworldly materials that had the same filmy consistency of recycled garbage bags, but for evening the look was polished up in chic gleaming white leather covered in micro knots or hairy fringing.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

The best grooming effect we've seen all season, the hair at Rick Owens was cut into sharply flared wedges - the models' hair possessing the structure and density of manicured garden hedges. While a stiff, angular construction dominated the cuts above the neck, there was a diametrically opposing flowing force below it. Owens' fashion silhouette this season was, as ever, presented with razor precision:  a loosened column dress whose length was exaggerated with delicate layers of sheer veiling or crinkled silk. He used otherworldly materials that had the same filmy consistency of recycled garbage bags, but for evening the look was polished up in chic gleaming white leather covered in micro knots or hairy fringing.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

The best grooming effect we've seen all season, the hair at Rick Owens was cut into sharply flared wedges - the models' hair possessing the structure and density of manicured garden hedges. While a stiff, angular construction dominated the cuts above the neck, there was a diametrically opposing flowing force below it. Owens' fashion silhouette this season was, as ever, presented with razor precision:  a loosened column dress whose length was exaggerated with delicate layers of sheer veiling or crinkled silk. He used otherworldly materials that had the same filmy consistency of recycled garbage bags, but for evening the look was polished up in chic gleaming white leather covered in micro knots or hairy fringing.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

The best grooming effect we've seen all season, the hair at Rick Owens was cut into sharply flared wedges - the models' hair possessing the structure and density of manicured garden hedges. While a stiff, angular construction dominated the cuts above the neck, there was a diametrically opposing flowing force below it. Owens' fashion silhouette this season was, as ever, presented with razor precision:  a loosened column dress whose length was exaggerated with delicate layers of sheer veiling or crinkled silk. He used otherworldly materials that had the same filmy consistency of recycled garbage bags, but for evening the look was polished up in chic gleaming white leather covered in micro knots or hairy fringing.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Rick Owens

The best grooming effect we've seen all season, the hair at Rick Owens was cut into sharply flared wedges - the models' hair possessing the structure and density of manicured garden hedges. While a stiff, angular construction dominated the cuts above the neck, there was a diametrically opposing flowing force below it. Owens' fashion silhouette this season was, as ever, presented with razor precision:  a loosened column dress whose length was exaggerated with delicate layers of sheer veiling or crinkled silk. He used otherworldly materials that had the same filmy consistency of recycled garbage bags, but for evening the look was polished up in chic gleaming white leather covered in micro knots or hairy fringing.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Peter Copping has been happily frolicking on sweet side of the fashion spectrum for so long that we'd almost forgotten he might have an itch for kink. This season at Nina Ricci he scratched it, jolting us out of our seats with his newly sexpot silhouettes and suggestive gold-zippered seaming that just begged for a tug and release. Though he played with all manner of girly fluttering chiffon, the best looks came about when Copping paired his rock solid feminine cocktail shapes with new, futuristic looking fabrics. Our favourite was the sheer black flouncing short dress that hugged the body like a plastic film.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Peter Copping has been happily frolicking on sweet side of the fashion spectrum for so long that we'd almost forgotten he might have an itch for kink. This season at Nina Ricci he scratched it, jolting us out of our seats with his newly sexpot silhouettes and suggestive gold-zippered seaming that just begged for a tug and release. Though he played with all manner of girly fluttering chiffon, the best looks came about when Copping paired his rock solid feminine cocktail shapes with new, futuristic looking fabrics. Our favourite was the sheer black flouncing short dress that hugged the body like a plastic film.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Peter Copping has been happily frolicking on sweet side of the fashion spectrum for so long that we'd almost forgotten he might have an itch for kink. This season at Nina Ricci he scratched it, jolting us out of our seats with his newly sexpot silhouettes and suggestive gold-zippered seaming that just begged for a tug and release. Though he played with all manner of girly fluttering chiffon, the best looks came about when Copping paired his rock solid feminine cocktail shapes with new, futuristic looking fabrics. Our favourite was the sheer black flouncing short dress that hugged the body like a plastic film.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Peter Copping has been happily frolicking on sweet side of the fashion spectrum for so long that we'd almost forgotten he might have an itch for kink. This season at Nina Ricci he scratched it, jolting us out of our seats with his newly sexpot silhouettes and suggestive gold-zippered seaming that just begged for a tug and release. Though he played with all manner of girly fluttering chiffon, the best looks came about when Copping paired his rock solid feminine cocktail shapes with new, futuristic looking fabrics. Our favourite was the sheer black flouncing short dress that hugged the body like a plastic film.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Nina Ricci

Peter Copping has been happily frolicking on sweet side of the fashion spectrum for so long that we'd almost forgotten he might have an itch for kink. This season at Nina Ricci he scratched it, jolting us out of our seats with his newly sexpot silhouettes and suggestive gold-zippered seaming that just begged for a tug and release. Though he played with all manner of girly fluttering chiffon, the best looks came about when Copping paired his rock solid feminine cocktail shapes with new, futuristic looking fabrics. Our favourite was the sheer black flouncing short dress that hugged the body like a plastic film.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

There are, after ten years, certain codes that define an Alber Elbaz-designed Lanvin show. There are the wickedly draped, figure-hugging cocktail dresses, there is the door knocker-sized metal detailing and sparkling glass shard embroidery, and there is his trouser shape - loose at the hip and tapered to a cropped ankle. Elbaz revisits these favourites every season, employing a colour palette of brilliant jewel tones that has also begun to feel mildly like fashion replay. The news this season was the new stiffened short skirt that had an sexy asymmetrical hem, paired with a cropped jacket. But even new touches like the brushed brass 'heavy-weight' champ belts paired with slinky bodysuits couldn't lift the collection into breakthrough territory. With such a loyal current following, maybe that's not a problem at all.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

There are, after ten years, certain codes that define an Alber Elbaz-designed Lanvin show. There are the wickedly draped, figure-hugging cocktail dresses, there is the door knocker-sized metal detailing and sparkling glass shard embroidery, and there is his trouser shape - loose at the hip and tapered to a cropped ankle. Elbaz revisits these favourites every season, employing a colour palette of brilliant jewel tones that has also begun to feel mildly like fashion replay. The news this season was the new stiffened short skirt that had an sexy asymmetrical hem, paired with a cropped jacket. But even new touches like the brushed brass 'heavy-weight' champ belts paired with slinky bodysuits couldn't lift the collection into breakthrough territory. With such a loyal current following, maybe that's not a problem at all.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

There are, after ten years, certain codes that define an Alber Elbaz-designed Lanvin show. There are the wickedly draped, figure-hugging cocktail dresses, there is the door knocker-sized metal detailing and sparkling glass shard embroidery, and there is his trouser shape - loose at the hip and tapered to a cropped ankle. Elbaz revisits these favourites every season, employing a colour palette of brilliant jewel tones that has also begun to feel mildly like fashion replay. The news this season was the new stiffened short skirt that had an sexy asymmetrical hem, paired with a cropped jacket. But even new touches like the brushed brass 'heavy-weight' champ belts paired with slinky bodysuits couldn't lift the collection into breakthrough territory. With such a loyal current following, maybe that's not a problem at all.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

There are, after ten years, certain codes that define an Alber Elbaz-designed Lanvin show. There are the wickedly draped, figure-hugging cocktail dresses, there is the door knocker-sized metal detailing and sparkling glass shard embroidery, and there is his trouser shape - loose at the hip and tapered to a cropped ankle. Elbaz revisits these favourites every season, employing a colour palette of brilliant jewel tones that has also begun to feel mildly like fashion replay. The news this season was the new stiffened short skirt that had an sexy asymmetrical hem, paired with a cropped jacket. But even new touches like the brushed brass 'heavy-weight' champ belts paired with slinky bodysuits couldn't lift the collection into breakthrough territory. With such a loyal current following, maybe that's not a problem at all.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Lanvin

There are, after ten years, certain codes that define an Alber Elbaz-designed Lanvin show. There are the wickedly draped, figure-hugging cocktail dresses, there is the door knocker-sized metal detailing and sparkling glass shard embroidery, and there is his trouser shape - loose at the hip and tapered to a cropped ankle. Elbaz revisits these favourites every season, employing a colour palette of brilliant jewel tones that has also begun to feel mildly like fashion replay. The news this season was the new stiffened short skirt that had an asymmetrical sexy hem and was paired with a cropped jacket.  But even new touches like the brushed brass 'heavy-weight' champ belts paired with slinky bodysuits couldn't lift the collection into breakthrough territory. With such a loyal current following, maybe that's not a problem at all.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Chalayan

When a designer like Hussein Chalayan titles his collection 'Seize the Day' it’s clear he’s given himself only one rule: no clichés. And for the designer, whose hyper conceptual collections will remain his strongest legacy, countering people’s expectations meant offering highly wearable pieces defined by flat and boxy shapes that, daresay, gave way to classic sportswear. You could almost see him sketching the designs, adding judicious hits of colour to an otherwise white page. The straw hats with visor fronts could prove a popular accessory – certainly more so than the palladium metal wig that accompanied the final, dramatic marble print dress. Clearly, Chalayan has too much fun playing with our heads.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: Amy Verner

Chalayan

When a designer like Hussein Chalayan titles his collection 'Seize the Day' it’s clear he’s given himself only one rule: no clichés. And for the designer, whose hyper conceptual collections will remain his strongest legacy, countering people’s expectations meant offering highly wearable pieces defined by flat and boxy shapes that, daresay, gave way to classic sportswear. You could almost see him sketching the designs, adding judicious hits of colour to an otherwise white page. The straw hats with visor fronts could prove a popular accessory – certainly more so than the palladium metal wig that accompanied the final, dramatic marble print dress. Clearly, Chalayan has too much fun playing with our heads.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: Amy Verner

Chalayan

When a designer like Hussein Chalayan titles his collection 'Seize the Day' it’s clear he’s given himself only one rule: no clichés. And for the designer, whose hyper conceptual collections will remain his strongest legacy, countering people’s expectations meant offering highly wearable pieces defined by flat and boxy shapes that, daresay, gave way to classic sportswear. You could almost see him sketching the designs, adding judicious hits of colour to an otherwise white page. The straw hats with visor fronts could prove a popular accessory – certainly more so than the palladium metal wig that accompanied the final, dramatic marble print dress. Clearly, Chalayan has too much fun playing with our heads.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: Amy Verner

Chalayan

When a designer like Hussein Chalayan titles his collection 'Seize the Day' it’s clear he’s given himself only one rule: no clichés. And for the designer, whose hyper conceptual collections will remain his strongest legacy, countering people’s expectations meant offering highly wearable pieces defined by flat and boxy shapes that, daresay, gave way to classic sportswear. You could almost see him sketching the designs, adding judicious hits of colour to an otherwise white page. The straw hats with visor fronts could prove a popular accessory – certainly more so than the palladium metal wig that accompanied the final, dramatic marble print dress. Clearly, Chalayan has too much fun playing with our heads.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: Amy Verner

Chalayan

When a designer like Hussein Chalayan titles his collection 'Seize the Day' it’s clear he’s given himself only one rule: no clichés. And for the designer, whose hyper conceptual collections will remain his strongest legacy, countering people’s expectations meant offering highly wearable pieces defined by flat and boxy shapes that, daresay, gave way to classic sportswear. You could almost see him sketching the designs, adding judicious hits of colour to an otherwise white page. The straw hats with visor fronts could prove a popular accessory – certainly more so than the palladium metal wig that accompanied the final, dramatic marble print dress. Clearly, Chalayan has too much fun playing with our heads.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: Amy Verner

Christian Dior

The atmosphere at Raf Simons' debut Women's ready-to-wear collection at Dior was electric. But the designer kept it cool, thoughtfully citing 'liberation' as a shared theme between himself and the house founder, Christian Dior, who made fashion history in the decade between 1947-1957.  'He embraced the feminine; the complex and the emotional, the idea of freedom from what had gone before,' Simons declared in his well-written show notes. 'The foundation of the house is a reaction to restrictions. I wanted to do that too.'  The 44-year-old Belgian designer took fashion's current craze for minimalism as the covenant to rebel against. He did it, of course, in a very controlled and studious way, replacing frills with straighter lines, using architectural pleating and creating layering with sheer veils. It still looked a heck of a lot more minimal than anything John Galliano ever rolled out of his honey jar, but it certainly gave a jolt to the staid way Dior’s ladies who lunch have been dressing for the last 15 years.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin
 

Christian Dior

The atmosphere at Raf Simons' debut Women's ready-to-wear collection at Dior was electric. But the designer kept it cool, thoughtfully citing 'liberation' as a shared theme between himself and the house founder, Christian Dior, who made fashion history in the decade between 1947-1957.  'He embraced the feminine; the complex and the emotional, the idea of freedom from what had gone before,' Simons declared in his well-written show notes. 'The foundation of the house is a reaction to restrictions. I wanted to do that too.'  The 44-year-old Belgian designer took fashion's current craze for minimalism as the covenant to rebel against. He did it, of course, in a very controlled and studious way, replacing frills with straighter lines, using architectural pleating and creating layering with sheer veils. It still looked a heck of a lot more minimal than anything John Galliano ever rolled out of his honey jar, but it certainly gave a jolt to the staid way Dior’s ladies who lunch have been dressing for the last 15 years.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Christian Dior

The atmosphere at Raf Simons' debut Women's ready-to-wear collection at Dior was electric. But the designer kept it cool, thoughtfully citing 'liberation' as a shared theme between himself and the house founder, Christian Dior, who made fashion history in the decade between 1947-1957.  'He embraced the feminine; the complex and the emotional, the idea of freedom from what had gone before,' Simons declared in his well-written show notes. 'The foundation of the house is a reaction to restrictions. I wanted to do that too.'  The 44-year-old Belgian designer took fashion's current craze for minimalism as the covenant to rebel against. He did it, of course, in a very controlled and studious way, replacing frills with straighter lines, using architectural pleating and creating layering with sheer veils. It still looked a heck of a lot more minimal than anything John Galliano ever rolled out of his honey jar, but it certainly gave a jolt to the staid way Dior’s ladies who lunch have been dressing for the last 15 years.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Christian Dior

The atmosphere at Raf Simons' debut Women's ready-to-wear collection at Dior was electric. But the designer kept it cool, thoughtfully citing 'liberation' as a shared theme between himself and the house founder, Christian Dior, who made fashion history in the decade between 1947-1957.  'He embraced the feminine; the complex and the emotional, the idea of freedom from what had gone before,' Simons declared in his well-written show notes. 'The foundation of the house is a reaction to restrictions. I wanted to do that too.'  The 44-year-old Belgian designer took fashion's current craze for minimalism as the covenant to rebel against (your supermarket cashier might not be rocking the look, but trust us, its a hefty trend). He did it, of course, in a very controlled and studious way, replacing frills with straighter lines, using architectural pleating and creating layering with sheer veils. It still looked a heck of a lot more minimal than anything John Galliano ever rolled out of his honey jar, but it certainly gave a jolt to the staid way Dior’s ladies who lunch have been dressing for the last 15 years.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Christian Dior

The atmosphere at Raf Simons' debut Women's ready-to-wear collection at Dior was electric. But the designer kept it cool, thoughtfully citing 'liberation' as a shared theme between himself and the house founder, Christian Dior, who made fashion history in the decade between 1947-1957.  'He embraced the feminine; the complex and the emotional, the idea of freedom from what had gone before,' Simons declared in his well-written show notes. 'The foundation of the house is a reaction to restrictions. I wanted to do that too.'  The 44-year-old Belgian designer took fashion's current craze for minimalism as the covenant to rebel against. He did it, of course, in a very controlled and studious way, replacing frills with straighter lines, using architectural pleating and creating layering with sheer veils. It still looked a heck of a lot more minimal than anything John Galliano ever rolled out of his honey jar, but it certainly gave a jolt to the staid way Dior’s ladies who lunch have been dressing for the last 15 years.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Christian Dior

The atmosphere at Raf Simons' debut Women's ready-to-wear collection at Dior was electric. But the designer kept it cool, thoughtfully citing 'liberation' as a shared theme between himself and the house founder, Christian Dior, who made fashion history in the decade between 1947-1957.  'He embraced the feminine; the complex and the emotional, the idea of freedom from what had gone before,' Simons declared in his well-written show notes. 'The foundation of the house is a reaction to restrictions. I wanted to do that too.'  The 44-year-old Belgian designer took fashion's current craze for minimalism as the covenant to rebel against. He did it, of course, in a very controlled and studious way, replacing frills with straighter lines, using architectural pleating and creating layering with sheer veils. It still looked a heck of a lot more minimal than anything John Galliano ever rolled out of his honey jar, but it certainly gave a jolt to the staid way Dior’s ladies who lunch have been dressing for the last 15 years.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

At a Margiela show, where 'wacky' still reigns, it's never a shocker to see a wardrobe staple being completely turned on its head. For Spring, the house presented a revisionist proposal of the classic pencil skirt and strapless dress. The former was lengthened at the front, the column skirt hems at the back then hiked right up to the model's rear ends, leading to all sorts of rear thigh exposure. The top half of strapless dresses were lifted up near the neck, beyond the confines of the collarbone, thanks to the armpit holes that were strategically scooped out of the single pieces of fabric. If all this sounds complicated, it actually wasn't: the show struck a cord with its simplicity, especially when it came to the sheer tent dresses that sloped from the models' pin heads gently to the ground like tulle volcanoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

At a Margiela show, where 'wacky' still reigns, it's never a shocker to see a wardrobe staple being completely turned on its head. For Spring, the house presented a revisionist proposal of the classic pencil skirt and strapless dress. The former was lengthened at the front, the column skirt hems at the back then hiked right up to the model's rear ends, leading to all sorts of rear thigh exposure. The top half of strapless dresses were lifted up near the neck, beyond the confines of the collarbone, thanks to the armpit holes that were strategically scooped out of the single pieces of fabric. If all this sounds complicated, it actually wasn't: the show struck a cord with its simplicity, especially when it came to the sheer tent dresses that sloped from the models' pin heads gently to the ground like tulle volcanoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

At a Margiela show, where 'wacky' still reigns, it's never a shocker to see a wardrobe staple being completely turned on its head. For Spring, the house presented a revisionist proposal of the classic pencil skirt and strapless dress. The former was lengthened at the front, the column skirt hems at the back then hiked right up to the model's rear ends, leading to all sorts of rear thigh exposure. The top half of strapless dresses were lifted up near the neck, beyond the confines of the collarbone, thanks to the armpit holes that were strategically scooped out of the single pieces of fabric. If all this sounds complicated, it actually wasn't: the show struck a cord with its simplicity, especially when it came to the sheer tent dresses that sloped from the models' pin heads gently to the ground like tulle volcanoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

At a Margiela show, where 'wacky' still reigns, it's never a shocker to see a wardrobe staple being completely turned on its head. For Spring, the house presented a revisionist proposal of the classic pencil skirt and strapless dress. The former was lengthened at the front, the column skirt hems at the back then hiked right up to the model's rear ends, leading to all sorts of rear thigh exposure. The top half of strapless dresses were lifted up near the neck, beyond the confines of the collarbone, thanks to the armpit holes that were strategically scooped out of the single pieces of fabric. If all this sounds complicated, it actually wasn't: the show struck a cord with its simplicity, especially when it came to the sheer tent dresses that sloped from the models' pin heads gently to the ground like tulle volcanoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Maison Martin Margiela

At a Margiela show, where 'wacky' still reigns, it's never a shocker to see a wardrobe staple being completely turned on its head. For Spring, the house presented a revisionist proposal of the classic pencil skirt and strapless dress. The former was lengthened at the front, the column skirt hems at the back then hiked right up to the model's rear ends, leading to all sorts of rear thigh exposure. The top half of strapless dresses were lifted up near the neck, beyond the confines of the collarbone, thanks to the armpit holes that were strategically scooped out of the single pieces of fabric. If all this sounds complicated, it actually wasn't: the show struck a cord with its simplicity, especially when it came to the sheer tent dresses that sloped from the models' pin heads gently to the ground like tulle volcanoes.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

Given that 99% of the world's globe-trotting population shows up to airports in jogging gear, it's about time that a proper, high-minded designer gave them something actually fashionable to put on (and we're not just talking about a flattering pair of yoga pants). Junya Watanabe did just that and more this season, delivering a hybrid 'on and off the mat' collection which, if marketed properly, could easily put the likes of Lululemon out of business. Employing traditional technical stretch materials, Watanabe used aerodynamic contours and intricate slicing to create new cuts and silhouettes for sportswear, also applying new textures and materials to tailored wear. The neon citrus palette made for a juicy two-tone graphic effect, while humble materials like black netting and silk nylon outerwear were reinterpreted into dresses. If everyone showed up to Heathrow in one of these get-ups, the world would be a saner, safer, more stylish place. There might be a few problems, however, in getting one of the lethally-sculpted silver metal helmets through airport security checks.

Words: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

Given that 99% of the world's globe-trotting population shows up to airports in jogging gear, it's about time that a proper, high-minded designer gave them something actually fashionable to put on (and we're not just talking about a flattering pair of yoga pants). Junya Watanabe did just that and more this season, delivering a hybrid 'on and off the mat' collection which, if marketed properly, could easily put the likes of Lululemon out of business. Employing traditional technical stretch materials, Watanabe used aerodynamic contours and intricate slicing to create new cuts and silhouettes for sportswear, also applying new textures and materials to tailored wear. The neon citrus palette made for a juicy two-tone graphic effect, while humble materials like black netting and silk nylon outerwear were reinterpreted into dresses. If everyone showed up to Heathrow in one of these get-ups, the world would be a saner, safer, more stylish place. There might be a few problems, however, in getting one of the lethally-sculpted silver metal helmets through airport security checks.

Words: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

Given that 99% of the world's globe-trotting population shows up to airports in jogging gear, it's about time that a proper, high-minded designer gave them something actually fashionable to put on (and we're not just talking about a flattering pair of yoga pants). Junya Watanabe did just that and more this season, delivering a hybrid 'on and off the mat' collection which, if marketed properly, could easily put the likes of Lululemon out of business. Employing traditional technical stretch materials, Watanabe used aerodynamic contours and intricate slicing to create new cuts and silhouettes for sportswear, also applying new textures and materials to tailored wear. The neon citrus palette made for a juicy two-tone graphic effect, while humble materials like black netting and silk nylon outerwear were reinterpreted into dresses. If everyone showed up to Heathrow in one of these get-ups, the world would be a saner, safer, more stylish place. There might be a few problems, however, in getting one of the lethally-sculpted silver metal helmets through airport security checks.

Words: J.J. Martin

Junya Watanabe

Given that 99% of the world's globe-trotting population shows up to airports in jogging gear, it's about time that a proper, high-minded designer gave them something actually fashionable to put on (and we're not just talking about a flattering pair of yoga pants). Junya Watanabe did just that and more this season, delivering a hybrid 'on and off the mat' collection which, if marketed properly, could easily put the likes of Lululemon out of business. Employing traditional technical stretch materials, Watanabe used aerodynamic contours and intricate slicing to create new cuts and silhouettes for sportswear, also applying new textures and materials to tailored wear. The neon citrus palette made for a juicy two-tone graphic effect, while humble materials like black netting and silk nylon outerwear were reinterpreted into dresses. If everyone showed up to Heathrow in one of these get-ups, the world would be a saner, safer, more stylish place. There might be a few problems, however, in getting one of the lethally-sculpted silver metal helmets through airport security checks.

Words: J.J. Martin

 

Junya Watanabe

Given that 99% of the world's globe-trotting population shows up to airports in jogging gear, it's about time that a proper, high-minded designer gave them something actually fashionable to put on (and we're not just talking about a flattering pair of yoga pants). Junya Watanabe did just that and more this season, delivering a hybrid 'on and off the mat' collection which, if marketed properly, could easily put the likes of Lululemon out of business. Employing traditional technical stretch materials, Watanabe used aerodynamic contours and intricate slicing to create new cuts and silhouettes for sportswear, also applying new textures and materials to tailored wear. The neon citrus palette made for a juicy two-tone graphic effect, while humble materials like black netting and silk nylon outerwear were reinterpreted into dresses. If everyone showed up to Heathrow in one of these get-ups, the world would be a saner, safer, more stylish place. There might be a few problems, however, in getting one of the lethally-sculpted silver metal helmets through airport security checks.

Words: J.J. Martin

 

Junya Watanabe

Given that 99% of the world's globe-trotting population shows up to airports in jogging gear, it's about time that a proper, high-minded designer gave them something actually fashionable to put on (and we're not just talking about a flattering pair of yoga pants). Junya Watanabe did just that and more this season, delivering a hybrid 'on and off the mat' collection which, if marketed properly, could easily put the likes of Lululemon out of business. Employing traditional technical stretch materials, Watanabe used aerodynamic contours and intricate slicing to create new cuts and silhouettes for sportswear, also applying new textures and materials to tailored wear. The neon citrus palette made for a juicy two-tone graphic effect, while humble materials like black netting and silk nylon outerwear were reinterpreted into dresses. If everyone showed up to Heathrow in one of these get-ups, the world would be a saner, safer, more stylish place. There might be a few problems, however, in getting one of the lethally-sculpted silver metal helmets through airport security checks.

Words: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

As usual, the Haider Ackermann show was a study in extremes. The Colombian-born, Paris-based designer constructed highly elaborate piles of sculptural tailoring that had a strong whiff of Gianfranco Ferré about them. Using his favoured stiff structured satins and shiny taffetas, his extra wide-leg trousers and peak-shouldered jackets could have stood up on their own even without the lean frames of the models' bodies underneath. Now that the designer has a burgeoning business and clearly more cash to spend, scrolls of fabric grew with wild abandon like jewelled weeds around necks and along the edges of jackets. Ackermann contrasted the rigidity with floating layers of tissue thin chiffon. It is hard to know whether a woman would want to be this stiff in her suit, or how she might negotiate a 5 ft printed chiffon train shooting out from behind her trousers, but the ballooning veils made for a lovely statement of softness in Ackermann's increasingly complex workmanship.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

As usual, the Haider Ackermann show was a study in extremes. The Colombian-born, Paris-based designer constructed highly elaborate piles of sculptural tailoring that had a strong whiff of Gianfranco Ferré about them. Using his favoured stiff structured satins and shiny taffetas, his extra wide-leg trousers and peak-shouldered jackets could have stood up on their own even without the lean frames of the models' bodies underneath. Now that the designer has a burgeoning business and clearly more cash to spend, scrolls of fabric grew with wild abandon like jewelled weeds around necks and along the edges of jackets. Ackermann contrasted the rigidity with floating layers of tissue thin chiffon. It is hard to know whether a woman would want to be this stiff in her suit, or how she might negotiate a 5 ft printed chiffon train shooting out from behind her trousers, but the ballooning veils made for a lovely statement of softness in Ackermann's increasingly complex workmanship.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

As usual, the Haider Ackermann show was a study in extremes. The Colombian-born, Paris-based designer constructed highly elaborate piles of sculptural tailoring that had a strong whiff of Gianfranco Ferré about them. Using his favoured stiff structured satins and shiny taffetas, his extra wide-leg trousers and peak-shouldered jackets could have stood up on their own even without the lean frames of the models' bodies underneath. Now that the designer has a burgeoning business and clearly more cash to spend, scrolls of fabric grew with wild abandon like jewelled weeds around necks and along the edges of jackets. Ackermann contrasted the rigidity with floating layers of tissue thin chiffon. It is hard to know whether a woman would want to be this stiff in her suit, or how she might negotiate a 5 ft printed chiffon train shooting out from behind her trousers, but the ballooning veils made for a lovely statement of softness in Ackermann's increasingly complex workmanship.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

As usual, the Haider Ackermann show was a study in extremes. The Colombian-born, Paris-based designer constructed highly elaborate piles of sculptural tailoring that had a strong whiff of Gianfranco Ferré about them. Using his favoured stiff structured satins and shiny taffetas, his extra wide-leg trousers and peak-shouldered jackets could have stood up on their own even without the lean frames of the models' bodies underneath. Now that the designer has a burgeoning business and clearly more cash to spend, scrolls of fabric grew with wild abandon like jewelled weeds around necks and along the edges of jackets. Ackermann contrasted the rigidity with floating layers of tissue thin chiffon. It is hard to know whether a woman would want to be this stiff in her suit, or how she might negotiate a 5 ft printed chiffon train shooting out from behind her trousers, but the ballooning veils made for a lovely statement of softness in Ackermann's increasingly complex workmanship.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Haider Ackermann

As usual, the Haider Ackermann show was a study in extremes. The Colombian-born, Paris-based designer constructed highly elaborate piles of sculptural tailoring that had a strong whiff of Gianfranco Ferré about them. Using his favoured stiff structured satins and shiny taffetas, his extra wide-leg trousers and peak-shouldered jackets could have stood up on their own even without the lean frames of the models' bodies underneath. Now that the designer has a burgeoning business and clearly more cash to spend, scrolls of fabric grew with wild abandon like jewelled weeds around necks and along the edges of jackets. Ackermann contrasted the rigidity with floating layers of tissue thin chiffon. It is hard to know whether a woman would want to be this stiff in her suit, or how she might negotiate a 5 ft printed chiffon train shooting out from behind her trousers, but the ballooning veils made for a lovely statement of softness in Ackermann's increasingly complex workmanship.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Last season's outing may have been an exploration into flat graphic 2D fashion, but for Spring, Rei Kawakubo returned back to her 3D realm of creation. The Japanese hotshot's outfits, built up with collages of mashed clothing scraps, looked as if the contents of a squashed suitcase had suddenly been affixed onto models' bodies. Kawakubo used raw matte materials, starting with a cream canvas, then exploring a muted golden metallic palette, before settling into matte black. As always, the haphazard looks had a logical splendour and were crowned with spectacular headgear - think piles of scrunched-up tin cans, the residue of a fender bender, or plastic buckets, secured around the neck like a child's birthday hat. The theme of mashing and packing one's belongings hit a crescendo in the finale when heaps of jacket and dress components were literally strapped down to the models's chests, making them look like fashion pack mules.

Words: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Last season's outing may have been an exploration into flat graphic 2D fashion, but for Spring, Rei Kawakubo returned back to her 3D realm of creation. The Japanese hotshot's outfits, built up with collages of mashed clothing scraps, looked as if the contents of a squashed suitcase had suddenly been affixed onto models' bodies. Kawakubo used raw matte materials, starting with a cream canvas, then exploring a muted golden metallic palette, before settling into matte black. As always, the haphazard looks had a logical splendour and were crowned with spectacular headgear - think piles of scrunched-up tin cans, the residue of a fender bender, or plastic buckets, secured around the neck like a child's birthday hat. The theme of mashing and packing one's belongings hit a crescendo in the finale when heaps of jacket and dress components were literally strapped down to the models's chests, making them look like fashion pack mules.

Words: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Last season's outing may have been an exploration into flat graphic 2D fashion, but for Spring, Rei Kawakubo returned back to her 3D realm of creation. The Japanese hotshot's outfits, built up with collages of mashed clothing scraps, looked as if the contents of a squashed suitcase had suddenly been affixed onto models' bodies. Kawakubo used raw matte materials, starting with a cream canvas, then exploring a muted golden metallic palette, before settling into matte black. As always, the haphazard looks had a logical splendour and were crowned with spectacular headgear - think piles of scrunched-up tin cans, the residue of a fender bender, or plastic buckets, secured around the neck like a child's birthday hat. The theme of mashing and packing one's belongings hit a crescendo in the finale when heaps of jacket and dress components were literally strapped down to the models's chests, making them look like fashion pack mules.

Words: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Last season's outing may have been an exploration into flat graphic 2D fashion, but for Spring, Rei Kawakubo returned back to her 3D realm of creation. The Japanese hotshot's outfits, built up with collages of mashed clothing scraps, looked as if the contents of a squashed suitcase had suddenly been affixed onto models' bodies. Kawakubo used raw matte materials, starting with a cream canvas, then exploring a muted golden metallic palette, before settling into matte black. As always, the haphazard looks had a logical splendour and were crowned with spectacular headgear - think piles of scrunched-up tin cans, the residue of a fender bender, or plastic buckets, secured around the neck like a child's birthday hat. The theme of mashing and packing one's belongings hit a crescendo in the finale when heaps of jacket and dress components were literally strapped down to the models's chests, making them look like fashion pack mules.

Words: J.J. Martin

Comme des Garçons

Last season's outing may have been an exploration into flat graphic 2D fashion, but for Spring, Rei Kawakubo returned back to her 3D realm of creation. The Japanese hotshot's outfits, built up with collages of mashed clothing scraps, looked as if the contents of a squashed suitcase had suddenly been affixed onto models' bodies. Kawakubo used raw matte materials, starting with a cream canvas, then exploring a muted golden metallic palette, before settling into matte black. As always, the haphazard looks had a logical splendour and were crowned with spectacular headgear - think piles of scrunched-up tin cans, the residue of a fender bender, or plastic buckets, secured around the neck like a child's birthday hat. The theme of mashing and packing one's belongings hit a crescendo in the finale when heaps of jacket and dress components were literally strapped down to the models's chests, making them look like fashion pack mules.

Words: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Spanish leather goods house Loewe took a sharp exit from its usually quirky ladylike realm and made a bee-line for sexpot territory this season. Of course, the brand’s signature buttery thin leathers and suedes came along for the joyride, but they were whipped up into skin-tight pencil skirts and belly-baring bra tops worn under bomber jackets or jackets with tulle arms. Tomato red, which is shaping up to be the colour of the season, was used liberally, providing a juicy counterpoint to the chocolate browns and blacks. This was certainly a steamier outing than we’ve ever seen by Loewe, but it brought a welcome gust of fresh air to the straight-laced brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Spanish leather goods house Loewe took a sharp exit from its usually quirky ladylike realm and made a bee-line for sexpot territory this season. Of course, the brand’s signature buttery thin leathers and suedes came along for the joyride, but they were whipped up into skin-tight pencil skirts and belly-baring bra tops worn under bomber jackets or jackets with tulle arms. Tomato red, which is shaping up to be the colour of the season, was used liberally, providing a juicy counterpoint to the chocolate browns and blacks. This was certainly a steamier outing than we’ve ever seen by Loewe, but it brought a welcome gust of fresh air to the straight-laced brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Spanish leather goods house Loewe took a sharp exit from its usually quirky ladylike realm and made a bee-line for sexpot territory this season. Of course, the brand’s signature buttery thin leathers and suedes came along for the joyride, but they were whipped up into skin-tight pencil skirts and belly-baring bra tops worn under bomber jackets or jackets with tulle arms. Tomato red, which is shaping up to be the colour of the season, was used liberally, providing a juicy counterpoint to the chocolate browns and blacks. This was certainly a steamier outing than we’ve ever seen by Loewe, but it brought a welcome gust of fresh air to the straight-laced brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Spanish leather goods house Loewe took a sharp exit from its usually quirky ladylike realm and made a bee-line for sexpot territory this season. Of course, the brand’s signature buttery thin leathers and suedes came along for the joyride, but they were whipped up into skin-tight pencil skirts and belly-baring bra tops worn under bomber jackets or jackets with tulle arms. Tomato red, which is shaping up to be the colour of the season, was used liberally, providing a juicy counterpoint to the chocolate browns and blacks. This was certainly a steamier outing than we’ve ever seen by Loewe, but it brought a welcome gust of fresh air to the straight-laced brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Loewe

Spanish leather goods house Loewe took a sharp exit from its usually quirky ladylike realm and made a bee-line for sexpot territory this season. Of course, the brand’s signature buttery thin leathers and suedes came along for the joyride, but they were whipped up into skin-tight pencil skirts and belly-baring bra tops worn under bomber jackets or jackets with tulle arms. Tomato red, which is shaping up to be the colour of the season, was used liberally, providing a juicy counterpoint to the chocolate browns and blacks. This was certainly a steamier outing than we’ve ever seen by Loewe, but it brought a welcome gust of fresh air to the straight-laced brand.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

In less than two years Humberto Leon and Carol Lim have sealed their fate as the best Americans in Paris since Marc Jacobs. While other designers might founder at reviving a dusty brand, their creative imprint at Kenzo has been immediate and crystal clear. Much of that success is due to the duo's commitment to keeping things simple and streamlining their collections to include nothing but young, hip sportswear. This season they took on a jungle theme, shaking all manner of easy modernism from the coconut trees. Classic 1970s pieces, like off-the-shoulder dresses, safari jackets and slouchy boots, were stripped of their tired hippie origins and given a wearable, straightforward urban gloss. The shapes were uncomplicated yet never dull, boosted by a digital micro-neon jungle print inspired by night-vision goggles.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

In less than two years Humberto Leon and Carol Lim have sealed their fate as the best Americans in Paris since Marc Jacobs. While other designers might founder at reviving a dusty brand, their creative imprint at Kenzo has been immediate and crystal clear. Much of that success is due to the duo's commitment to keeping things simple and streamlining their collections to include nothing but young, hip sportswear. This season they took on a jungle theme, shaking all manner of easy modernism from the coconut trees. Classic 1970s pieces, like off-the-shoulder dresses, safari jackets and slouchy boots, were stripped of their tired hippie origins and given a wearable, straightforward urban gloss. The shapes were uncomplicated yet never dull, boosted by a digital micro-neon jungle print inspired by night-vision goggles.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

In less than two years Humberto Leon and Carol Lim have sealed their fate as the best Americans in Paris since Marc Jacobs. While other designers might founder at reviving a dusty brand, their creative imprint at Kenzo has been immediate and crystal clear. Much of that success is due to the duo's commitment to keeping things simple and streamlining their collections to include nothing but young, hip sportswear. This season they took on a jungle theme, shaking all manner of easy modernism from the coconut trees. Classic 1970s pieces, like off-the-shoulder dresses, safari jackets and slouchy boots, were stripped of their tired hippie origins and given a wearable, straightforward urban gloss. The shapes were uncomplicated yet never dull, boosted by a digital micro-neon jungle print inspired by night-vision goggles.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

In less than two years Humberto Leon and Carol Lim have sealed their fate as the best Americans in Paris since Marc Jacobs. While other designers might founder at reviving a dusty brand, their creative imprint at Kenzo has been immediate and crystal clear. Much of that success is due to the duo's commitment to keeping things simple and streamlining their collections to include nothing but young, hip sportswear. This season they took on a jungle theme, shaking all manner of easy modernism from the coconut trees. Classic 1970s pieces, like off-the-shoulder dresses, safari jackets and slouchy boots, were stripped of their tired hippie origins and given a wearable, straightforward urban gloss. The shapes were uncomplicated yet never dull, boosted by a digital micro-neon jungle print inspired by night-vision goggles.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Kenzo

In less than two years Humberto Leon and Carol Lim have sealed their fate as the best Americans in Paris since Marc Jacobs. While other designers might founder at reviving a dusty brand, their creative imprint at Kenzo has been immediate and crystal clear. Much of that success is due to the duo's commitment to keeping things simple and streamlining their collections to include nothing but young, hip sportswear. This season they took on a jungle theme, shaking all manner of easy modernism from the coconut trees. Classic 1970s pieces, like off-the-shoulder dresses, safari jackets and slouchy boots, were stripped of their tired hippie origins and given a wearable, straightforward urban gloss. The shapes were uncomplicated yet never dull, boosted by a digital micro-neon jungle print inspired by night-vision goggles.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Céline

Pity the person who tries to get in the way of Phoebe Philo and the gargantuan roll she is currently commandeering through the halls of fashion history. The woman is on fire - even after disappearing for a few months to give birth. For Spring, Philo stiffened up her trademark razor-sharp tailoring using rigid satin and silk taffetas. The news was a twist, literally, as fabric wrung across the chest or waist to create fresh folded details. Our favourite looks were her clinical takes on feminine classics, like a navy dress that fell in perfect lines to mid calf, or a champagne satin tunic over an ivory satin pencil skirt that could insta-chic pretty much anyone. While it was all was rigorously controlled from the ankle upward, Philo let out her wild side on wacky fur Birkenstock-esque sandals and ladylike pumps. Picture a woman's foot bathing in a shallow pool of plush mink all day and you'll understand why this designer is beloved of on-the-go women worldwide.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Céline

Pity the person who tries to get in the way of Phoebe Philo and the gargantuan roll she is currently commandeering through the halls of fashion history. The woman is on fire - even after disappearing for a few months to give birth. For Spring, Philo stiffened up her trademark razor-sharp tailoring using rigid satin and silk taffetas. The news was a twist, literally, as fabric wrung across the chest or waist to create fresh folded details. Our favourite looks were her clinical takes on feminine classics, like a navy dress that fell in perfect lines to mid calf, or a champagne satin tunic over an ivory satin pencil skirt that could insta-chic pretty much anyone. While it was all was rigorously controlled from the ankle upward, Philo let out her wild side on wacky fur Birkenstock-esque sandals and ladylike pumps. Picture a woman's foot bathing in a shallow pool of plush mink all day and you'll understand why this designer is beloved of on-the-go women worldwide.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Céline

Pity the person who tries to get in the way of Phoebe Philo and the gargantuan roll she is currently commandeering through the halls of fashion history. The woman is on fire - even after disappearing for a few months to give birth. For Spring, Philo stiffened up her trademark razor-sharp tailoring using rigid satin and silk taffetas. The news was a twist, literally, as fabric wrung across the chest or waist to create fresh folded details. Our favourite looks were her clinical takes on feminine classics, like a navy dress that fell in perfect lines to mid calf, or a champagne satin tunic over an ivory satin pencil skirt that could insta-chic pretty much anyone. While it was all was rigorously controlled from the ankle upward, Philo let out her wild side on wacky fur Birkenstock-esque sandals and ladylike pumps. Picture a woman's foot bathing in a shallow pool of plush mink all day and you'll understand why this designer is beloved of on-the-go women worldwide.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Céline

Pity the person who tries to get in the way of Phoebe Philo and the gargantuan roll she is currently commandeering through the halls of fashion history. The woman is on fire - even after disappearing for a few months to give birth. For Spring, Philo stiffened up her trademark razor-sharp tailoring using rigid satin and silk taffetas. The news was a twist, literally, as fabric wrung across the chest or waist to create fresh folded details. Our favourite looks were her clinical takes on feminine classics, like a navy dress that fell in perfect lines to mid calf, or a champagne satin tunic over an ivory satin pencil skirt that could insta-chic pretty much anyone. While it was all was rigorously controlled from the ankle upward, Philo let out her wild side on wacky fur Birkenstock-esque sandals and ladylike pumps. Picture a woman's foot bathing in a shallow pool of plush mink all day and you'll understand why this designer is beloved of on-the-go women worldwide.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Céline

Pity the person who tries to get in the way of Phoebe Philo and the gargantuan roll she is currently commandeering through the halls of fashion history. The woman is on fire - even after disappearing for a few months to give birth. For Spring, Philo stiffened up her trademark razor-sharp tailoring using rigid satin and silk taffetas. The news was a twist, literally, as fabric wrung across the chest or waist to create fresh folded details. Our favourite looks were her clinical takes on feminine classics, like a navy dress that fell in perfect lines to mid calf, or a champagne satin tunic over an ivory satin pencil skirt that could insta-chic pretty much anyone. While it was all was rigorously controlled from the ankle upward, Philo let out her wild side on wacky fur Birkenstock-esque sandals and ladylike pumps. Picture a woman's foot bathing in a shallow pool of plush mink all day and you'll understand why this designer is beloved of on-the-go women worldwide.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Hermès

The paper-thin slices of suede and leather at the Hermès show had the glossy softness of a butter log sitting out all afternoon on the kitchen counter. They were, in a word, delicious. The pliability of the luxurious skins made it effortless for creative director Christophe Lemaire to construct swinging sportswear silhouettes using easy, fluid lines. A tunic top and flared shorts, for example, arrived in splendid emerald-green crocodile or pool-blue suede and leather, but had the ease and accessibility (we're not referring to price, of course) of featherweight cotton. The outerwear, including cape-top jackets and boxy, leather-trimmed coats, was just as simply enticing, blending clean forms with sleek sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Hermès

The paper-thin slices of suede and leather at the Hermès show had the glossy softness of a butter log sitting out all afternoon on the kitchen counter. They were, in a word, delicious. The pliability of the luxurious skins made it effortless for creative director Christophe Lemaire to construct swinging sportswear silhouettes using easy, fluid lines. A tunic top and flared shorts, for example, arrived in splendid emerald-green crocodile or pool-blue suede and leather, but had the ease and accessibility (we're not referring to price, of course) of featherweight cotton. The outerwear, including cape-top jackets and boxy, leather-trimmed coats, was just as simply enticing, blending clean forms with sleek sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Hermès

The paper-thin slices of suede and leather at the Hermès show had the glossy softness of a butter log sitting out all afternoon on the kitchen counter. They were, in a word, delicious. The pliability of the luxurious skins made it effortless for creative director Christophe Lemaire to construct swinging sportswear silhouettes using easy, fluid lines. A tunic top and flared shorts, for example, arrived in splendid emerald-green crocodile or pool-blue suede and leather, but had the ease and accessibility (we're not referring to price, of course) of featherweight cotton. The outerwear, including cape-top jackets and boxy, leather-trimmed coats, was just as simply enticing, blending clean forms with sleek sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Hermès

The paper-thin slices of suede and leather at the Hermès show had the glossy softness of a butter log sitting out all afternoon on the kitchen counter. They were, in a word, delicious. The pliability of the luxurious skins made it effortless for creative director Christophe Lemaire to construct swinging sportswear silhouettes using easy, fluid lines. A tunic top and flared shorts, for example, arrived in splendid emerald-green crocodile or pool-blue suede and leather, but had the ease and accessibility (we're not referring to price, of course) of featherweight cotton. The outerwear, including cape-top jackets and boxy, leather-trimmed coats, was just as simply enticing, blending clean forms with sleek sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Hermès

The paper-thin slices of suede and leather at the Hermès show had the glossy softness of a butter log sitting out all afternoon on the kitchen counter. They were, in a word, delicious. The pliability of the luxurious skins made it effortless for creative director Christophe Lemaire to construct swinging sportswear silhouettes using easy, fluid lines. A tunic top and flared shorts, for example, arrived in splendid emerald-green crocodile or pool-blue suede and leather, but had the ease and accessibility (we're not referring to price, of course) of featherweight cotton. The outerwear, including cape-top jackets and boxy, leather-trimmed coats, was just as simply enticing, blending clean forms with sleek sophistication.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Akris

Inspiration for this season's Akris show came from Roberto Burle Marx, the Brazilian landscape designer known for his curvaceous cutting. Like Burle Marx, Akris creative director Albert Kriemler ditched straight lines for a winding road of textured surfaces. Sheer inserts wound around the curves of the body, their seams sinuously cut, foiling their strategically placed matt counterpoints. Contours traced onto knit dresses had the same mad logic as ant tracks, but were actually inspired by a bird's-eye view of Burle Marx's roof garden at the Banco Safra HQ in São Paulo. This matt vs sheer body contouring (which can often trick the eye to the wearer's benefit) is nothing new, but kudos to Kreimler for always giving us a strong link to the world of art and architecture.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Akris

Inspiration for this season's Akris show came from Roberto Burle Marx, the Brazilian landscape designer known for his curvaceous cutting. Like Burle Marx, Akris creative director Albert Kriemler ditched straight lines for a winding road of textured surfaces. Sheer inserts wound around the curves of the body, their seams sinuously cut, foiling their strategically placed matt counterpoints. Contours traced onto knit dresses had the same mad logic as ant tracks, but were actually inspired by a bird's-eye view of Burle Marx's roof garden at the Banco Safra HQ in São Paulo. This matt vs sheer body contouring (which can often trick the eye to the wearer's benefit) is nothing new, but kudos to Kreimler for always giving us a strong link to the world of art and architecture.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Akris

Inspiration for this season's Akris show came from Roberto Burle Marx, the Brazilian landscape designer known for his curvaceous cutting. Like Burle Marx, Akris creative director Albert Kriemler ditched straight lines for a winding road of textured surfaces. Sheer inserts wound around the curves of the body, their seams sinuously cut, foiling their strategically placed matt counterpoints. Contours traced onto knit dresses had the same mad logic as ant tracks, but were actually inspired by a bird's-eye view of Burle Marx's roof garden at the Banco Safra HQ in São Paulo. This matt vs sheer body contouring (which can often trick the eye to the wearer's benefit) is nothing new, but kudos to Kreimler for always giving us a strong link to the world of art and architecture.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Akris

Inspiration for this season's Akris show came from Roberto Burle Marx, the Brazilian landscape designer known for his curvaceous cutting. Like Burle Marx, Akris creative director Albert Kriemler ditched straight lines for a winding road of textured surfaces. Sheer inserts wound around the curves of the body, their seams sinuously cut, foiling their strategically placed matt counterpoints. Contours traced onto knit dresses had the same mad logic as ant tracks, but were actually inspired by a bird's-eye view of Burle Marx's roof garden at the Banco Safra HQ in São Paulo. This matt vs sheer body contouring (which can often trick the eye to the wearer's benefit) is nothing new, but kudos to Kreimler for always giving us a strong link to the world of art and architecture.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Akris

Inspiration for this season's Akris show came from Roberto Burle Marx, the Brazilian landscape designer known for his curvaceous cutting. Like Burle Marx, Akris creative director Albert Kriemler ditched straight lines for a winding road of textured surfaces. Sheer inserts wound around the curves of the body, their seams sinuously cut, foiling their strategically placed matt counterpoints. Contours traced onto knit dresses had the same mad logic as ant tracks, but were actually inspired by a bird's-eye view of Burle Marx's roof garden at the Banco Safra HQ in São Paulo. This matt vs sheer body contouring (which can often trick the eye to the wearer's benefit) is nothing new, but kudos to Kreimler for always giving us a strong link to the world of art and architecture.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

There has been an ongoing fascination with traditional couture fabrications this season, but nowhere were they used to such intriguing effect as at Givenchy. Riccardo Tisci, king of an edgy and sometimes gritty street-style, dipped into the rich coffers at his Maison's archives for Spring - giving a rich, elegant tinge to his modern silhouettes. The Italian designer pulled out exquisite radzimir, crepe marocain, jacquard gaufre, moire, duchesse satin and organza, applying them liberally to a strict palette of white, black, baby blue and grey (ensuring that none of his night-crawling It Girls will be turned off by the new direction). The rigidity was tamed with beautiful scrolls of feminine waves, proving what a magnificent cutter Tisci really is.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

There has been an ongoing fascination with traditional couture fabrications this season, but nowhere were they used to such intriguing effect as at Givenchy. Riccardo Tisci, king of an edgy and sometimes gritty street-style, dipped into the rich coffers at his Maison's archives for Spring - giving a rich, elegant tinge to his modern silhouettes. The Italian designer pulled out exquisite radzimir, crepe marocain, jacquard gaufre, moire, duchesse satin and organza, applying them liberally to a strict palette of white, black, baby blue and grey (ensuring that none of his night-crawling It Girls will be turned off by the new direction). The rigidity was tamed with beautiful scrolls of feminine waves, proving what a magnificent cutter Tisci really is.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

There has been an ongoing fascination with traditional couture fabrications this season, but nowhere were they used to such intriguing effect as at Givenchy. Riccardo Tisci, king of an edgy and sometimes gritty street-style, dipped into the rich coffers at his Maison's archives for Spring - giving a rich, elegant tinge to his modern silhouettes. The Italian designer pulled out exquisite radzimir, crepe marocain, jacquard gaufre, moire, duchesse satin and organza, applying them liberally to a strict palette of white, black, baby blue and grey (ensuring that none of his night-crawling It Girls will be turned off by the new direction). The rigidity was tamed with beautiful scrolls of feminine waves, proving what a magnificent cutter Tisci really is.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

There has been an ongoing fascination with traditional couture fabrications this season, but nowhere were they used to such intriguing effect as at Givenchy. Riccardo Tisci, king of an edgy and sometimes gritty street-style, dipped into the rich coffers at his Maison's archives for Spring - giving a rich, elegant tinge to his modern silhouettes. The Italian designer pulled out exquisite radzimir, crepe marocain, jacquard gaufre, moire, duchesse satin and organza, applying them liberally to a strict palette of white, black, baby blue and grey (ensuring that none of his night-crawling It Girls will be turned off by the new direction). The rigidity was tamed with beautiful scrolls of feminine waves, proving what a magnificent cutter Tisci really is.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Givenchy

There has been an ongoing fascination with traditional couture fabrications this season, but nowhere were they used to such intriguing effect as at Givenchy. Riccardo Tisci, king of an edgy and sometimes gritty street-style, dipped into the rich coffers at his Maison's archives for Spring - giving a rich, elegant tinge to his modern silhouettes. The Italian designer pulled out exquisite radzimir, crepe marocain, jacquard gaufre, moire, duchesse satin and organza, applying them liberally to a strict palette of white, black, baby blue and grey (ensuring that none of his night-crawling It Girls will be turned off by the new direction). The rigidity was tamed with beautiful scrolls of feminine waves, proving what a magnificent cutter Tisci really is.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Stella McCartney

For every curve, there seemed to be an angle. That's just one of the push-and-pull moves that made this an especially strong - and beautifully balanced - collection for Stella McCartney. To the elongated plissé dresses, she added giant ellipses in shades of tangerine and spearmint, creating the effect of hard-edge painting. The designer made room for both tailoring and body-skimming cuts, using opaque twill and sheer organza. Where she was strict with shoulders, she softened her trousers, showing layer on layer of cuff in some instances. Even the footwear - lucite platform wedges with vamps in perforated neoprene or organic cotton - expressed a sporty duality that was every bit fresh and clean.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Amy Verner

Stella McCartney

For every curve, there seemed to be an angle. That's just one of the push-and-pull moves that made this an especially strong - and beautifully balanced - collection for Stella McCartney. To the elongated plissé dresses, she added giant ellipses in shades of tangerine and spearmint, creating the effect of hard-edge painting. The designer made room for both tailoring and body-skimming cuts, using opaque twill and sheer organza. Where she was strict with shoulders, she softened her trousers, showing layer on layer of cuff in some instances. Even the footwear - lucite platform wedges with vamps in perforated neoprene or organic cotton - expressed a sporty duality that was every bit fresh and clean.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Amy Verner

Stella McCartney

For every curve, there seemed to be an angle. That's just one of the push-and-pull moves that made this an especially strong - and beautifully balanced - collection for Stella McCartney. To the elongated plissé dresses, she added giant ellipses in shades of tangerine and spearmint, creating the effect of hard-edge painting. The designer made room for both tailoring and body-skimming cuts, using opaque twill and sheer organza. Where she was strict with shoulders, she softened her trousers, showing layer on layer of cuff in some instances. Even the footwear - lucite platform wedges with vamps in perforated neoprene or organic cotton - expressed a sporty duality that was every bit fresh and clean.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Amy Verner

Stella McCartney

For every curve, there seemed to be an angle. That's just one of the push-and-pull moves that made this an especially strong - and beautifully balanced - collection for Stella McCartney. To the elongated plissé dresses, she added giant ellipses in shades of tangerine and spearmint, creating the effect of hard-edge painting. The designer made room for both tailoring and body-skimming cuts, using opaque twill and sheer organza. Where she was strict with shoulders, she softened her trousers, showing layer on layer of cuff in some instances. Even the footwear - lucite platform wedges with vamps in perforated neoprene or organic cotton - expressed a sporty duality that was every bit fresh and clean.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Amy Verner

Chloé

The things we discovered at the Chloé show - namely softened, swinging tailoring - were as important as what we didn't - like overly sweet confections. A strong reliance on the former gave the collection a fluid nonchalance, while a rejection of the latter meant that the brand wasn't mired in its hardcore girly roots. Ever sure of her role as creative director, Clare Waight Keller isn't afraid to take on traditional notions of femininity and run with these. After all, there were enough embroidered daisies and sparkle-trimmed tulle in this collection to satisfy any inner-princess. But it's amazing how those girlish touches weren't what you took away from the collection at all. Rather, what stuck out was the strict adherence to a measured palette of white, beige, blush and black, and the cool way that Waight Keller managed to blow a contemporary wind through the legs of Bermuda shorts, wide-hipped trousers or the geometric white cut-out dresses. The clean canvas allowed for feminine touches such as cropped cape jackets, swinging mini skirts and layered organza undershirts to be introduced, without ever straying into territory that was too sugary and precious.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Stella McCartney

For every curve, there seemed to be an angle. That's just one of the push-and-pull moves that made this an especially strong - and beautifully balanced - collection for Stella McCartney. To the elongated plissé dresses, she added giant ellipses in shades of tangerine and spearmint, creating the effect of hard-edge painting. The designer made room for both tailoring and body-skimming cuts, using opaque twill and sheer organza. Where she was strict with shoulders, she softened her trousers, showing layer on layer of cuff in some instances. Even the footwear - lucite platform wedges with vamps in perforated neoprene or organic cotton - expressed a sporty duality that was every bit fresh and clean.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Amy Verner

Chloé

The things we discovered at the Chloé show - namely softened, swinging tailoring - were as important as what we didn't - like overly sweet confections. A strong reliance on the former gave the collection a fluid nonchalance, while a rejection of the latter meant that the brand wasn't mired in its hardcore girly roots. Ever sure of her role as creative director, Clare Waight Keller isn't afraid to take on traditional notions of femininity and run with these. After all, there were enough embroidered daisies and sparkle-trimmed tulle in this collection to satisfy any inner-princess. But it's amazing how those girlish touches weren't what you took away from the collection at all. Rather, what stuck out was the strict adherence to a measured palette of white, beige, blush and black, and the cool way that Waight Keller managed to blow a contemporary wind through the legs of Bermuda shorts, wide-hipped trousers or the geometric white cut-out dresses. The clean canvas allowed for feminine touches such as cropped cape jackets, swinging mini skirts and layered organza undershirts to be introduced, without ever straying into territory that was too sugary and precious.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Chloé

The things we discovered at the Chloé show - namely softened, swinging tailoring - were as important as what we didn't - like overly sweet confections. A strong reliance on the former gave the collection a fluid nonchalance, while a rejection of the latter meant that the brand wasn't mired in its hardcore girly roots. Ever sure of her role as creative director, Clare Waight Keller isn't afraid to take on traditional notions of femininity and run with these. After all, there were enough embroidered daisies and sparkle-trimmed tulle in this collection to satisfy any inner-princess. But it's amazing how those girlish touches weren't what you took away from the collection at all. Rather, what stuck out was the strict adherence to a measured palette of white, beige, blush and black, and the cool way that Waight Keller managed to blow a contemporary wind through the legs of Bermuda shorts, wide-hipped trousers or the geometric white cut-out dresses. The clean canvas allowed for feminine touches such as cropped cape jackets, swinging mini skirts and layered organza undershirts to be introduced, without ever straying into territory that was too sugary and precious.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Chloé

The things we discovered at the Chloé show - namely softened, swinging tailoring - were as important as what we didn't - like overly sweet confections. A strong reliance on the former gave the collection a fluid nonchalance, while a rejection of the latter meant that the brand wasn't mired in its hardcore girly roots. Ever sure of her role as creative director, Clare Waight Keller isn't afraid to take on traditional notions of femininity and run with these. After all, there were enough embroidered daisies and sparkle-trimmed tulle in this collection to satisfy any inner-princess. But it's amazing how those girlish touches weren't what you took away from the collection at all. Rather, what stuck out was the strict adherence to a measured palette of white, beige, blush and black, and the cool way that Waight Keller managed to blow a contemporary wind through the legs of Bermuda shorts, wide-hipped trousers or the geometric white cut-out dresses. The clean canvas allowed for feminine touches such as cropped cape jackets, swinging mini skirts and layered organza undershirts to be introduced, without ever straying into territory that was too sugary and precious.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Chloé

The things we discovered at the Chloé show - namely softened, swinging tailoring - were as important as what we didn't - like overly sweet confections. A strong reliance on the former gave the collection a fluid nonchalance, while a rejection of the latter meant that the brand wasn't mired in its hardcore girly roots. Ever sure of her role as creative director, Clare Waight Keller isn't afraid to take on traditional notions of femininity and run with these. After all, there were enough embroidered daisies and sparkle-trimmed tulle in this collection to satisfy any inner-princess. But it's amazing how those girlish touches weren't what you took away from the collection at all. Rather, what stuck out was the strict adherence to a measured palette of white, beige, blush and black, and the cool way that Waight Keller managed to blow a contemporary wind through the legs of Bermuda shorts, wide-hipped trousers or the geometric white cut-out dresses. The clean canvas allowed for feminine touches such as cropped cape jackets, swinging mini skirts and layered organza undershirts to be introduced, without ever straying into territory that was too sugary and precious.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It is clear from Hedi Slimane's debut at the house of Yves Saint Laurent (for the record, the ready-to-wear collection is now known simply as Saint Laurent) that the designer has spent more than just a long August in the tinsel-lined town of Los Angeles. From the straightforward skinny suiting and bow-front blouses to the flowing glamazon kaftan dresses - all worn with vertiginous pin heels and retro floppy wide brimmed hats - the look evoked the ease of 'brainless' summer living by the beach. Or, more succinctly, what Rachel Zoe might wear when she comes to Paris or jets off to St. Barths. To be absolutely fair, the silhouettes were all born in Yves' own trail-blazing years of the 1960s and 1970s, when the revolutionary designer introduced lace-up safari shirts, Le Smoking jackets, and flowing peasant gowns to the starving fashion masses. But since then, these signatures have been mined, picked apart and rehashed by every designer from Tom Ford to Diane Von Furstenberg. Certainly, Slimane knows how to rock a Talitha Getty kaftan dress and a full-length buttery suede safari dress, but we're looking forward to seeing how he plans to move these key signatures of the house - and of fashion history - forward for the 21st century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It is clear from Hedi Slimane's debut at the house of Yves Saint Laurent (for the record, the ready-to-wear collection is now known simply as Saint Laurent) that the designer has spent more than just a long August in the tinsel-lined town of Los Angeles. From the straightforward skinny suiting and bow-front blouses to the flowing glamazon kaftan dresses - all worn with vertiginous pin heels and retro floppy wide brimmed hats - the look evoked the ease of 'brainless' summer living by the beach. Or, more succinctly, what Rachel Zoe might wear when she comes to Paris or jets off to St. Barths. To be absolutely fair, the silhouettes were all born in Yves' own trail-blazing years of the 1960s and 1970s, when the revolutionary designer introduced lace-up safari shirts, Le Smoking jackets, and flowing peasant gowns to the starving fashion masses. But since then, these signatures have been mined, picked apart and rehashed by every designer from Tom Ford to Diane Von Furstenberg. Certainly, Slimane knows how to rock a Talitha Getty kaftan dress and a full-length buttery suede safari dress, but we're looking forward to seeing how he plans to move these key signatures of the house - and of fashion history - forward for the 21st century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It is clear from Hedi Slimane's debut at the house of Yves Saint Laurent (for the record, the ready-to-wear collection is now known simply as Saint Laurent) that the designer has spent more than just a long August in the tinsel-lined town of Los Angeles. From the straightforward skinny suiting and bow-front blouses to the flowing glamazon kaftan dresses - all worn with vertiginous pin heels and retro floppy wide brimmed hats - the look evoked the ease of 'brainless' summer living by the beach. Or, more succinctly, what Rachel Zoe might wear when she comes to Paris or jets off to St. Barths. To be absolutely fair, the silhouettes were all born in Yves' own trail-blazing years of the 1960s and 1970s, when the revolutionary designer introduced lace-up safari shirts, Le Smoking jackets, and flowing peasant gowns to the starving fashion masses. But since then, these signatures have been mined, picked apart and rehashed by every designer from Tom Ford to Diane Von Furstenberg. Certainly, Slimane knows how to rock a Talitha Getty kaftan dress and a full-length buttery suede safari dress, but we're looking forward to seeing how he plans to move these key signatures of the house - and of fashion history - forward for the 21st century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

Saint Laurent

It is clear from Hedi Slimane's debut at the house of Yves Saint Laurent (for the record, the ready-to-wear collection is now known simply as Saint Laurent) that the designer has spent more than just a long August in the tinsel-lined town of Los Angeles. From the straightforward skinny suiting and bow-front blouses to the flowing glamazon kaftan dresses - all worn with vertiginous pin heels and retro floppy wide brimmed hats - the look evoked the ease of 'brainless' summer living by the beach. Or, more succinctly, what Rachel Zoe might wear when she comes to Paris or jets off to St. Barths. To be absolutely fair, the silhouettes were all born in Yves' own trail-blazing years of the 1960s and 1970s, when the revolutionary designer introduced lace-up safari shirts, Le Smoking jackets, and flowing peasant gowns to the starving fashion masses. But since then, these signatures have been mined, picked apart and rehashed by every designer from Tom Ford to Diane Von Furstenberg. Certainly, Slimane knows how to rock a Talitha Getty kaftan dress and a full-length buttery suede safari dress, but we're looking forward to seeing how he plans to move these key signatures of the house - and of fashion history - forward for the 21st century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

 

Saint Laurent

It is clear from Hedi Slimane's debut at the house of Yves Saint Laurent (for the record, the ready-to-wear collection is now known simply as Saint Laurent) that the designer has spent more than just a long August in the tinsel-lined town of Los Angeles. From the straightforward skinny suiting and bow-front blouses to the flowing glamazon kaftan dresses - all worn with vertiginous pin heels and retro floppy wide brimmed hats - the look evoked the ease of 'brainless' summer living by the beach. Or, more succinctly, what Rachel Zoe might wear when she comes to Paris or jets off to St. Barths. To be absolutely fair, the silhouettes were all born in Yves' own trail-blazing years of the 1960s and 1970s, when the revolutionary designer introduced lace-up safari shirts, Le Smoking jackets, and flowing peasant gowns to the starving fashion masses. But since then, these signatures have been mined, picked apart and rehashed by every designer from Tom Ford to Diane Von Furstenberg. Certainly, Slimane knows how to rock a Talitha Getty kaftan dress and a full-length buttery suede safari dress, but we're looking forward to seeing how he plans to move these key signatures of the house - and of fashion history - forward for the 21st century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: J.J. Martin

 

Chanel

There's nothing better than when Karl Lagerfeld has his game on at Chanel. For Spring the designer hit the bull's-eye by keeping things simple and focusing on the key, unfussy shapes that every woman wants in her wardrobe. That meant perfectly structured Chanel suits, modernised with a slightly swinging shape, stovepipe pants, trapeze-shaped dresses and gorgeous curve-hugging gowns. The decoration here - oyster-sized pearls used as embroideries on dresses or clusters of rich necklaces and cuffs - was perfectly judged on the polished looks. As too were other ladylike extras, such as elegant satin Mary Jane heels with plastic uppers. Even the quirky accessories looked spot on this season, from the striped leather espadrilles, to the flying saucer plastic sun hats and, our personal favourite, the hula hoop-quilted Chanel beach bag.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Chanel

There's nothing better than when Karl Lagerfeld has his game on at Chanel. For Spring the designer hit the bull's-eye by keeping things simple and focusing on the key, unfussy shapes that every woman wants in her wardrobe. That meant perfectly structured Chanel suits, modernised with a slightly swinging shape, stovepipe pants, trapeze-shaped dresses and gorgeous curve-hugging gowns. The decoration here - oyster-sized pearls used as embroideries on dresses or clusters of rich necklaces and cuffs - was perfectly judged on the polished looks. As too were other ladylike extras, such as elegant satin Mary Jane heels with plastic uppers. Even the quirky accessories looked spot on this season, from the striped leather espadrilles, to the flying saucer plastic sun hats and, our personal favourite, the hula hoop-quilted Chanel beach bag.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Chanel

There's nothing better than when Karl Lagerfeld has his game on at Chanel. For Spring the designer hit the bull's-eye by keeping things simple and focusing on the key, unfussy shapes that every woman wants in her wardrobe. That meant perfectly structured Chanel suits, modernised with a slightly swinging shape, stovepipe pants, trapeze-shaped dresses and gorgeous curve-hugging gowns. The decoration here - oyster-sized pearls used as embroideries on dresses or clusters of rich necklaces and cuffs - was perfectly judged on the polished looks. As too were other ladylike extras, such as elegant satin Mary Jane heels with plastic uppers. Even the quirky accessories looked spot on this season, from the striped leather espadrilles, to the flying saucer plastic sun hats and, our personal favourite, the hula hoop-quilted Chanel beach bag.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Chanel

There's nothing better than when Karl Lagerfeld has his game on at Chanel. For Spring the designer hit the bull's-eye by keeping things simple and focusing on the key, unfussy shapes that every woman wants in her wardrobe. That meant perfectly structured Chanel suits, modernised with a slightly swinging shape, stovepipe pants, trapeze-shaped dresses and gorgeous curve-hugging gowns. The decoration here - oyster-sized pearls used as embroideries on dresses or clusters of rich necklaces and cuffs - was perfectly judged on the polished looks. As too were other ladylike extras, such as elegant satin Mary Jane heels with plastic uppers. Even the quirky accessories looked spot on this season, from the striped leather espadrilles, to the flying saucer plastic sun hats and, our personal favourite, the hula hoop-quilted Chanel beach bag.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Chanel

There's nothing better than when Karl Lagerfeld has his game on at Chanel. For Spring the designer hit the bull's-eye by keeping things simple and focusing on the key, unfussy shapes that every woman wants in her wardrobe. That meant perfectly structured Chanel suits, modernised with a slightly swinging shape, stovepipe pants, trapeze-shaped dresses and gorgeous curve-hugging gowns. The decoration here - oyster-sized pearls used as embroideries on dresses or clusters of rich necklaces and cuffs - was perfectly judged on the polished looks. As too were other ladylike extras, such as elegant satin Mary Jane heels with plastic uppers. Even the quirky accessories looked spot on this season, from the striped leather espadrilles, to the flying saucer plastic sun hats and, our personal favourite, the hula hoop-quilted Chanel beach bag.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Valentino

The Valentino shows have ripened into such assuredly beautiful affairs that there can not be a woman on the planet who does not wish to look like this.  Even if a woman's style normally precludes the use of puff sleeves or lace dresses, there has got to be at least one moment in her life when she needs to looks graceful and gorgeous. And this is the place to come for it. For Spring Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli used graphic oversized daisies as their new bright white lace motif over a tulle base, while an embroidered brocade gave a stiffened cage-like appearance to A-line cocktail dresses. While the clothes were the epitome of gorgeous propriety, there was a bit of subversion down below on the models' feet, where curved perspex wedges were flecked with bits of floating gold foil.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Valentino

The Valentino shows have ripened into such assuredly beautiful affairs that there can not be a woman on the planet who does not wish to look like this.  Even if a woman's style normally precludes the use of puff sleeves or lace dresses, there has got to be at least one moment in her life when she needs to looks graceful and gorgeous. And this is the place to come for it. For Spring Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli used graphic oversized daisies as their new bright white lace motif over a tulle base, while an embroidered brocade gave a stiffened cage-like appearance to A-line cocktail dresses. While the clothes were the epitome of gorgeous propriety, there was a bit of subversion down below on the models' feet, where curved perspex wedges were flecked with bits of floating gold foil.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Valentino

The Valentino shows have ripened into such assuredly beautiful affairs that there can not be a woman on the planet who does not wish to look like this.  Even if a woman's style normally precludes the use of puff sleeves or lace dresses, there has got to be at least one moment in her life when she needs to looks graceful and gorgeous. And this is the place to come for it. For Spring Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli used graphic oversized daisies as their new bright white lace motif over a tulle base, while an embroidered brocade gave a stiffened cage-like appearance to A-line cocktail dresses. While the clothes were the epitome of gorgeous propriety, there was a bit of subversion down below on the models' feet, where curved perspex wedges were flecked with bits of floating gold foil.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Valentino

The Valentino shows have ripened into such assuredly beautiful affairs that there can not be a woman on the planet who does not wish to look like this.  Even if a woman's style normally precludes the use of puff sleeves or lace dresses, there has got to be at least one moment in her life when she needs to looks graceful and gorgeous. And this is the place to come for it. For Spring Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli used graphic oversized daisies as their new bright white lace motif over a tulle base, while an embroidered brocade gave a stiffened cage-like appearance to A-line cocktail dresses. While the clothes were the epitome of gorgeous propriety, there was a bit of subversion down below on the models' feet, where curved perspex wedges were flecked with bits of floating gold foil.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Valentino

The Valentino shows have ripened into such assuredly beautiful affairs that there can not be a woman on the planet who does not wish to look like this.  Even if a woman's style normally precludes the use of puff sleeves or lace dresses, there has got to be at least one moment in her life when she needs to looks graceful and gorgeous. And this is the place to come for it. For Spring Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli used graphic oversized daisies as their new bright white lace motif over a tulle base, while an embroidered brocade gave a stiffened cage-like appearance to A-line cocktail dresses. While the clothes were the epitome of gorgeous propriety, there was a bit of subversion down below on the models' feet, where curved perspex wedges were flecked with bits of floating gold foil.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

There once was a kinder, simpler time when a man could make a woman's knees weak just by flexing one well-sculpted bicep on a sunlounger at the country club pool. Giambattista Valli captured a lot of that late 1950s freshness in his Spring Moncler Gamme Rouge show. The exceptionally well-groomed men did a great job of 'showing off while splashing around' when they began doing handstands by a fake pool in their white Speedos. The objects of these men's desire were artfully constructed women that appeared, at least looks-wise, to be just as untouchably innocent. With swim caps in white piqué or crystal embroideries, and their trapeze-shaped cover-ups in shaved tulle or floral clusters, they were mere objects to be admired, not to be listened to. Their long black eyelashes, white silk flower hats, and trails of great-looking Moncler luggage made this a fashion fantasy worth holding on to.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

There once was a kinder, simpler time when a man could make a woman's knees weak just by flexing one well-sculpted bicep on a sunlounger at the country club pool. Giambattista Valli captured a lot of that late 1950s freshness in his Spring Moncler Gamme Rouge show. The exceptionally well-groomed men did a great job of 'showing off while splashing around' when they began doing handstands by a fake pool in their white Speedos. The objects of these men's desire were artfully constructed women that appeared, at least looks-wise, to be just as untouchably innocent. With swim caps in white piqué or crystal embroideries, and their trapeze-shaped cover-ups in shaved tulle or floral clusters, they were mere objects to be admired, not to be listened to. Their long black eyelashes, white silk flower hats, and trails of great-looking Moncler luggage made this a fashion fantasy worth holding on to.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

There once was a kinder, simpler time when a man could make a woman's knees weak just by flexing one well-sculpted bicep on a sunlounger at the country club pool. Giambattista Valli captured a lot of that late 1950s freshness in his Spring Moncler Gamme Rouge show. The exceptionally well-groomed men did a great job of 'showing off while splashing around' when they began doing handstands by a fake pool in their white Speedos. The objects of these men's desire were artfully constructed women that appeared, at least looks-wise, to be just as untouchably innocent. With swim caps in white piqué or crystal embroideries, and their trapeze-shaped cover-ups in shaved tulle or floral clusters, they were mere objects to be admired, not to be listened to. Their long black eyelashes, white silk flower hats, and trails of great-looking Moncler luggage made this a fashion fantasy worth holding on to.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

There once was a kinder, simpler time when a man could make a woman's knees weak just by flexing one well-sculpted bicep on a sunlounger at the country club pool. Giambattista Valli captured a lot of that late 1950s freshness in his Spring Moncler Gamme Rouge show. The exceptionally well-groomed men did a great job of 'showing off while splashing around' when they began doing handstands by a fake pool in their white Speedos. The objects of these men's desire were artfully constructed women that appeared, at least looks-wise, to be just as untouchably innocent. With swim caps in white piqué or crystal embroideries, and their trapeze-shaped cover-ups in shaved tulle or floral clusters, they were mere objects to be admired, not to be listened to. Their long black eyelashes, white silk flower hats, and trails of great-looking Moncler luggage made this a fashion fantasy worth holding on to.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Moncler Gamme Rouge

There once was a kinder, simpler time when a man could make a woman's knees weak just by flexing one well-sculpted bicep on a sunlounger at the country club pool. Giambattista Valli captured a lot of that late 1950s freshness in his Spring Moncler Gamme Rouge show. The exceptionally well-groomed men did a great job of 'showing off while splashing around' when they began doing handstands by a fake pool in their white Speedos. The objects of these men's desire were artfully constructed women that appeared, at least looks-wise, to be just as untouchably innocent. With swim caps in white piqué or crystal embroideries, and their trapeze-shaped cover-ups in shaved tulle or floral clusters, they were mere objects to be admired, not to be listened to. Their long black eyelashes, white silk flower hats, and trails of great-looking Moncler luggage made this a fashion fantasy worth holding on to.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Alexander McQueen

Sarah Burton's stunning Spring collection for Alexander McQueen was a smash hit from start to finish, with Burton's signature workmanship building up until it hit a technical zenith on a gilded gown worn with a gold-beaded hoop skirt on the outside. Burton's theme this season was bees - a seemingly simple topic that we never imagined could be explored with so much creative richness. Honeycomb patterns were buried into laser-cut embroidered leather while beekeepers' masks were transformed into millinery marvels, adorned with embroidered flowers. Burton obsessed over the female form this season, cinching her waists into cage corsets and padding the hips for a rococo roundness. The influence may have a whiff of the 18th century, but Burton is one of the few designers who is creating a stage for her own original vision for this century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

 

Alexander McQueen

Sarah Burton's stunning Spring collection for Alexander McQueen was a smash hit from start to finish, with Burton's signature workmanship building up until it hit a technical zenith on a gilded gown worn with a gold-beaded hoop skirt on the outside. Burton's theme this season was bees - a seemingly simple topic that we never imagined could be explored with so much creative richness. Honeycomb patterns were buried into laser-cut embroidered leather while beekeepers' masks were transformed into millinery marvels, adorned with embroidered flowers. Burton obsessed over the female form this season, cinching her waists into cage corsets and padding the hips for a rococo roundness. The influence may have a whiff of the 18th century, but Burton is one of the few designers who is creating a stage for her own original vision for this century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Alexander McQueen

Sarah Burton's stunning Spring collection for Alexander McQueen was a smash hit from start to finish, with Burton's signature workmanship building up until it hit a technical zenith on a gilded gown worn with a gold-beaded hoop skirt on the outside. Burton's theme this season was bees - a seemingly simple topic that we never imagined could be explored with so much creative richness. Honeycomb patterns were buried into laser-cut embroidered leather while beekeepers' masks were transformed into millinery marvels, adorned with embroidered flowers. Burton obsessed over the female form this season, cinching her waists into cage corsets and padding the hips for a rococo roundness. The influence may have a whiff of the 18th century, but Burton is one of the few designers who is creating a stage for her own original vision for this century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Alexander McQueen

Sarah Burton's stunning Spring collection for Alexander McQueen was a smash hit from start to finish, with Burton's signature workmanship building up until it hit a technical zenith on a gilded gown worn with a gold-beaded hoop skirt on the outside. Burton's theme this season was bees - a seemingly simple topic that we never imagined could be explored with so much creative richness. Honeycomb patterns were buried into laser-cut embroidered leather while beekeepers' masks were transformed into millinery marvels, adorned with embroidered flowers. Burton obsessed over the female form this season, cinching her waists into cage corsets and padding the hips for a rococo roundness. The influence may have a whiff of the 18th century, but Burton is one of the few designers who is creating a stage for her own original vision for this century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Alexander McQueen

Sarah Burton's stunning Spring collection for Alexander McQueen was a smash hit from start to finish, with Burton's signature workmanship building up until it hit a technical zenith on a gilded gown worn with a gold-beaded hoop skirt on the outside. Burton's theme this season was bees - a seemingly simple topic that we never imagined could be explored with so much creative richness. Honeycomb patterns were buried into laser-cut embroidered leather while beekeepers' masks were transformed into millinery marvels, adorned with embroidered flowers. Burton obsessed over the female form this season, cinching her waists into cage corsets and padding the hips for a rococo roundness. The influence may have a whiff of the 18th century, but Burton is one of the few designers who is creating a stage for her own original vision for this century.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

 

Louis Vuitton

Marc Jacobs' outings at Louis Vuitton are usually creative logo fests, crammed with the French brand's LV monogram. For Spring however there wasn't a single initial in sight - just the house's more oblique but no less subtle Damier graphic, a checkerboard pattern that Jacobs used by the fistful. The effect of the oversized block graphics, used liberally as prints or embroideries on Jacobs' new silhouette - long, straight, and simplified - was just as loud-mouthed as any logo could hope to be, but a whole lot more fun. Especially when you take into consideration the way he paired off his models on the catwalk - like groups of shopping buddies who all had bouffant 'fresh from the salon' hairdos. The routine was choreographed to perfection, but the graphic block approach - which at times made the Vuitton woman look like a human chess board - was, as always in the case of Jacobs, a terrific fashion statement maker.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

Marc Jacobs' outings at Louis Vuitton are usually creative logo fests, crammed with the French brand's LV monogram. For Spring however there wasn't a single initial in sight - just the house's more oblique but no less subtle Damier graphic, a checkerboard pattern that Jacobs used by the fistful. The effect of the oversized block graphics, used liberally as prints or embroideries on Jacobs' new silhouette - long, straight, and simplified - was just as loud-mouthed as any logo could hope to be, but a whole lot more fun. Especially when you take into consideration the way he paired off his models on the catwalk - like groups of shopping buddies who all had bouffant 'fresh from the salon' hairdos. The routine was choreographed to perfection, but the graphic block approach - which at times made the Vuitton woman look like a human chess board - was, as always in the case of Jacobs, a terrific fashion statement maker.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

Marc Jacobs' outings at Louis Vuitton are usually creative logo fests, crammed with the French brand's LV monogram. For Spring however there wasn't a single initial in sight - just the house's more oblique but no less subtle Damier graphic, a checkerboard pattern that Jacobs used by the fistful. The effect of the oversized block graphics, used liberally as prints or embroideries on Jacobs' new silhouette - long, straight, and simplified - was just as loud-mouthed as any logo could hope to be, but a whole lot more fun. Especially when you take into consideration the way he paired off his models on the catwalk - like groups of shopping buddies who all had bouffant 'fresh from the salon' hairdos. The routine was choreographed to perfection, but the graphic block approach - which at times made the Vuitton woman look like a human chess board - was, as always in the case of Jacobs, a terrific fashion statement maker.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

Marc Jacobs' outings at Louis Vuitton are usually creative logo fests, crammed with the French brand's LV monogram. For Spring however there wasn't a single initial in sight - just the house's more oblique but no less subtle Damier graphic, a checkerboard pattern that Jacobs used by the fistful. The effect of the oversized block graphics, used liberally as prints or embroideries on Jacobs' new silhouette - long, straight, and simplified - was just as loud-mouthed as any logo could hope to be, but a whole lot more fun. Especially when you take into consideration the way he paired off his models on the catwalk - like groups of shopping buddies who all had bouffant 'fresh from the salon' hairdos. The routine was choreographed to perfection, but the graphic block approach - which at times made the Vuitton woman look like a human chess board - was, as always in the case of Jacobs, a terrific fashion statement maker.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Louis Vuitton

Marc Jacobs' outings at Louis Vuitton are usually creative logo fests, crammed with the French brand's LV monogram. For Spring however there wasn't a single initial in sight - just the house's more oblique but no less subtle Damier graphic, a checkerboard pattern that Jacobs used by the fistful. The effect of the oversized block graphics, used liberally as prints or embroideries on Jacobs' new silhouette - long, straight, and simplified - was just as loud-mouthed as any logo could hope to be, but a whole lot more fun. Especially when you take into consideration the way he paired off his models on the catwalk - like groups of shopping buddies who all had bouffant 'fresh from the salon' hairdos. The routine was choreographed to perfection, but the graphic block approach - which at times made the Vuitton woman look like a human chess board - was, as always in the case of Jacobs, a terrific fashion statement maker.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

 

Miu Miu

This season at Miu Miu, Miuccia Prada returned to her preferred playground of dismantling, bit by bit, the glass walls of lady-like dressing. There were more than a few elements borrowed from Hitchcockian heroines in this collection: the 1950s curved-heel pumps, the elegantly gloved hands clenching flat envelope handbags, and the silhouettes predicated on straight 3/4-length skirts and trapeze-shaped jackets that swung with elegant swagger. Trousers, so prominently featured in her Fall collection, have shaped up to be a one season aberration. The 'perfect picture' was dismantled by fox stoles marred by ink-stained florals, plastic-looking patent leather, and grooming that was deliberately unkempt. Rather than donning freshly-pressed platinum chignons, the models looked like prison wards who'd taken to their heads personally with a blunt-edged razor. Which, by the way, was a whole lot like the look über-cool Chloë Sevigny was rocking on the front row. Like the introduction of stiffened denim on her lady like suiting, it was just another one of Ms. Prada's famously sideways method of cutting down on the sugar content of her elegant theme.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu

This season at Miu Miu, Miuccia Prada returned to her preferred playground of dismantling, bit by bit, the glass walls of lady-like dressing. There were more than a few elements borrowed from Hitchcockian heroines in this collection: the 1950s curved-heel pumps, the elegantly gloved hands clenching flat envelope handbags, and the silhouettes predicated on straight 3/4-length skirts and trapeze-shaped jackets that swung with elegant swagger. Trousers, so prominently featured in her Fall collection, have shaped up to be a one season aberration. The 'perfect picture' was dismantled by fox stoles marred by ink-stained florals, plastic-looking patent leather, and grooming that was deliberately unkempt. Rather than donning freshly-pressed platinum chignons, the models looked like prison wards who'd taken to their heads personally with a blunt-edged razor. Which, by the way, was a whole lot like the look über-cool Chloë Sevigny was rocking on the front row. Like the introduction of stiffened denim on her lady like suiting, it was just another one of Ms. Prada's famously sideways method of cutting down on the sugar content of her elegant theme.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu

This season at Miu Miu, Miuccia Prada returned to her preferred playground of dismantling, bit by bit, the glass walls of lady-like dressing. There were more than a few elements borrowed from Hitchcockian heroines in this collection: the 1950s curved-heel pumps, the elegantly gloved hands clenching flat envelope handbags, and the silhouettes predicated on straight 3/4-length skirts and trapeze-shaped jackets that swung with elegant swagger. Trousers, so prominently featured in her Fall collection, have shaped up to be a one season aberration. The 'perfect picture' was dismantled by fox stoles marred by ink-stained florals, plastic-looking patent leather, and grooming that was deliberately unkempt. Rather than donning freshly-pressed platinum chignons, the models looked like prison wards who'd taken to their heads personally with a blunt-edged razor. Which, by the way, was a whole lot like the look über-cool Chloë Sevigny was rocking on the front row. Like the introduction of stiffened denim on her lady like suiting, it was just another one of Ms. Prada's famously sideways method of cutting down on the sugar content of her elegant theme.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu

This season at Miu Miu, Miuccia Prada returned to her preferred playground of dismantling, bit by bit, the glass walls of lady-like dressing. There were more than a few elements borrowed from Hitchcockian heroines in this collection: the 1950s curved-heel pumps, the elegantly gloved hands clenching flat envelope handbags, and the silhouettes predicated on straight 3/4-length skirts and trapeze-shaped jackets that swung with elegant swagger. Trousers, so prominently featured in her Fall collection, have shaped up to be a one season aberration. The 'perfect picture' was dismantled by fox stoles marred by ink-stained florals, plastic-looking patent leather, and grooming that was deliberately unkempt. Rather than donning freshly-pressed platinum chignons, the models looked like prison wards who'd taken to their heads personally with a blunt-edged razor. Which, by the way, was a whole lot like the look über-cool Chloë Sevigny was rocking on the front row. Like the introduction of stiffened denim on her lady like suiting, it was just another one of Ms. Prada's famously sideways method of cutting down on the sugar content of her elegant theme.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Miu Miu

This season at Miu Miu, Miuccia Prada returned to her preferred playground of dismantling, bit by bit, the glass walls of lady-like dressing. There were more than a few elements borrowed from Hitchcockian heroines in this collection: the 1950s curved-heel pumps, the elegantly gloved hands clenching flat envelope handbags, and the silhouettes predicated on straight 3/4-length skirts and trapeze-shaped jackets that swung with elegant swagger. Trousers, so prominently featured in her Fall collection, have shaped up to be a one season aberration. The 'perfect picture' was dismantled by fox stoles marred by ink-stained florals, plastic-looking patent leather, and grooming that was deliberately unkempt. Rather than donning freshly-pressed platinum chignons, the models looked like prison wards who'd taken to their heads personally with a blunt-edged razor. Which, by the way, was a whole lot like the look über-cool Chloë Sevigny was rocking on the front row. Like the introduction of stiffened denim on her lady like suiting, it was just another one of Ms. Prada's famously sideways method of cutting down on the sugar content of her elegant theme.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-EvansWords: J.J. Martin

Veronique Branquinho

Belgian designer Veronique Branquinho has returned to the catwalk after a three-year hiatus. Her comeback collection - an elegant, feminine take on Spring dressing - was worth the wait. She opened the show with a full-length nude dress with an iridescent layer of rose gold, and the same nude and peach tones proved the dominant colour narrative for the first half of the collection. The second half saw a familiar Branquinho touch: the push and pull between masculine and feminine. With a palette of moss green, navy blue, black and white, Branquinho brought out pantsuits and trousers paired with shirts, which were then softened with oversized arm sleeves or shrouded in wispy chiffon. Layers of billowy silk fabric - skillfully gathered, pleated and manipulated on the nude-toned goddess gowns - wafted gracefully, giving outfits the lightest of touches.

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Words: Apphia Michael


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