The W* Library: 10 new titles to add to your shelves

Book of Eating at Hotel
(Image credit: Juergen Teller)

Eating at Hotel Il Pellicano
By Antonio Guida, Juergen Teller and Will Self

With images by Juergen Teller and text by chef Antonio Guida (plus an introduction by Will Self), this is food photography reinvented for the modern age - all bright colours, dark shadows and glistening sauces. Teller treats food as he treats the human body, getting up close and personal, voyeuristically emphasising the unusual and perverse. Guida's residency at the Hotel Il Pellicano in Grosseto has resulted in two Michelin stars, and a transformation of the remote retreat into a gastronomic destination.

Published by Violette Editions (opens in new tab), £45

Inside the Eating at Hotel book

The book opens with a series of spreads of Antonio Guida's mouth-watering dishes, 

(Image credit: Juergen Teller)

Eating at Hotel Il Pellicano
By Antonio Guida, Juergen Teller and Will Self

With images by Juergen Teller and text by chef Antonio Guida (plus an introduction by Will Self), this is food photography reinvented for the modern age - all bright colours, dark shadows and glistening sauces. Teller treats food as he treats the human body, getting up close and personal, voyeuristically emphasising the unusual and perverse. Guida's residency at the Hotel Il Pellicano in Grosseto has resulted in two Michelin stars, and a transformation of the remote retreat into a gastronomic destination.

Published by Violette Editions (opens in new tab), £45

Guida's recipes in Eating at Hotel

Guida's recipes include red mullet wrapped in a courgette flower with pepper sauce and argan oil

(Image credit: TBC)

Eating at Hotel book design

The design of the book reflects Guida's wittiness in the kitchen

(Image credit: TBC)

Nature Morte: Contemporary artists reinvigorate the Still-Life tradition
By Michael Petry

The still life is a somewhat overlooked art form in the modern era, usurped by installations, technology and the slow but steady marginalisation of traditional artistic mediums. But scratch the surface of any major art show and the still life remains, the ultimate way of looking at the world through modern eyes. Work by Damien Hirst, Gerhard Richter, Marc Quinn, Gary Hume, David Hockney and lesser-known names fill the pages of this large monograph.

Published by Thames & Hudson (opens in new tab), £35; available from 14 October

Writer: Jonathan Bell

Book of Nature Morte

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book images of Orange Pyramid

From the book: 'Untitled (Orange Pyramid)', by Michael Coffin, 2007

(Image credit: TBC)

'Myth of the Metals' from the book

'Myth of the Metals', by Ged Quinn, 2012

(Image credit: TBC)

Image of 'Giallina from the book

'Giallina', by Joana Vasconcelos, 2008

(Image credit: TBC)

Image of 'Black Kites from the book

'Black Kites', by Gabriel Orozco, 1997

(Image credit: TBC)

Holidays After The Fall: Seaside Architecture and Urbanism in Bulgaria and Croatia
Edited by Elke Beyer, Anke Hagemann, Michael Zinganel

We'll admit to enjoying the niche appeal of this new slice of architectural history, but Holidays After the Fall is a special sort of social history. Looking at the great swathes of concrete-built vacation land that covered the coastlines of the former Eastern Bloc, Holidays chronicles the rise of officially sanctioned vacation culture, from its origins in the vast people's sanataria beloved by interwar totalitarians to the more utopian spaces that mirrored the growth along the decadent Mediterranean coast. After the fall - and after the region's turbulent modern era - it's the global tourism industry that is rediscovering this treasure trove of ready-made seaside infrastructure.  

Published by Jovis (opens in new tab), €29.80

Book of Holidays After The Fall

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: Hotel Haludovo in Malinska,

From the book: Hotel Haludovo in Malinska, designed by Boris Magaš, 1972.

(Image credit: TBC)

Swimming pools of the Hotel Palace

Haludovo in 2012 - an investment ruin. The abandoned swimming pools of the Hotel Palace.

(Image credit: Daniele Ansidei)

Coquina-paved terrace of Hotel Journalist

The restaurant annex and spacious coquina-paved terrace of Hotel Journalist in Chaka. Photography: BTA 1959

(Image credit: TBC)

Art Cities of the Future: 21st Century Avant-Gardes

Art used to be something that happened in predefined locations; to make it big, an artist had to make a pilgrimage to a centre of culture. This book follows the now-familiar Phaidon format of farming out its content to individual curators on the ground, in this case 12 art experts from a corresponding number of emerging art cities. These include big-hitters like Beirut, Delhi and Istanbul but also some more out-there predictions for the future: Lagos, San Juan and the Romanian city of Cluj.

Published by Phaidon (opens in new tab), £49.95

Book of Art Cities of the Future

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: 'Wave of Mind,

(Image credit: TBC)

View of 'Portrait of a Landscape

'Portrait of a Landscape: Abu Dhabi, by Ziad Antar, 2010

(Image credit: TBC)

View of 'Prospect Point',

'Prospect Point', by Kevin Schmidt, 2007

(Image credit: TBC)

100 Works of Art That Will Define Our Age
By Kelly Grovier

Making a stab at artistic eternity is not an easy task, but this new Thames & Hudson tome is an attempt at cataloguing the essential works of the modern era. Author Kelly Grovier has set himself a heady challenge, not least because each featured artist has to be pared down to a single, highly representative work. You can't argue with the line-up, but the temptation to box every career into a classic one-liner serves some artists worse than others (Hirst, Barney and Koons, for example). But as a snapshot of art's preoccupation with spectacle and statement, 100 Works is a grand definition of the age.

Published by Thames & Hudson (opens in new tab), £35

Book of 100 Works of Art That Will Define Our Age

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: 'Puppy

From the book: 'Puppy', by Jeff Koons, 1992

(Image credit: TBC)

View of 'Leviathan Thor

'Leviathan Thor', by Ernesto Neto, 2006

(Image credit: TBC)

View of 'Self'

'Self', by Marc Quinn, 1991

(Image credit: TBC)

Baccarat 1764: Two Hundred and Fifty Years
By Murray Moss and Laurence Benaïm

Even in an era of heritage-obsessed luxury branding, two and a half centuries at the top of your industry is a pretty impressive achievement. Understandably, Baccarat - the prestigious French crystalworks - wants to mark its 250th anniversary in style. The company kicks off with this hefty volume tracing the art, artistry and innovation of the company. The book delves deep into Baccarat's archives, presenting a starry client list and an array of spectacular set pieces, including work by Ettore Sottsass, Philippe Starck and Arik Levy.

Published by Rizzoli New York (opens in new tab), £55

Book of Baccarat 1764

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: 'Zenith Alvorada

From the book: 'Zénith Alvorada' chandelier, by Fernando and Umberto Campana, from the 'Fusion' collection, 2013

(Image credit: TBC)

Clear crystal cut-glass

'Charles X', pitcher, 1828. At the conclusion of Charles X’s visit to Lorraine in 1828, Baccarat presented this clear crystal cut-glass pitcher to the dauphin, Louis de Bourbon. It is decorated with the arms of France and Navarre, rendered in gold and polychrome enamel

(Image credit: TBC)

View of Baccarat's archives

An illustration from Baccarat's archives, circa 1858

(Image credit: TBC)

John Varvatos: Rock in Fashion
By John Varvatos and Holly George-Warren

Designer John Varvatos has a very different take on the rock-and-roll aesthetic. Since his childhood in Detroit - amid the contrast of frayed edges and sharp style, the ragged, vibrant noise of the Motor City and his heroes the Stooges and MC5 - Varvatos has been enthused by the sound, and sight, of rock. It's a well-charted obsession that has spilled over into his menswear, falling somewhere between the happily accidental appearance of addled rock star and the carefully contrived look of the hyper-stylised modern musician.

Published by Harper Design (opens in new tab), £40

Book of John Varvatos

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: Paul Weller

From the book: Paul Weller, whose band The Jam took its sly cues form the Who's mod period, with Pete Townshend.

(Image credit: : Janette Beckman)

View of Clash's style

(Image credit: Mark Hanauer)

A Blessing in Disguise: War and Town Planning in Europe 1940-1945
By Jörn Düwel and Niels Gutschow

An extraordinarily comprehensive look at the grand plans that rose out of the steaming ruins of 1940s Europe, A Blessing in Disguise examines the optimism, opportunism and quiet but resolute belief that the new Europe would be fair, democratic and fundamentally modern. It would be a world of new boulevards, expansive squares, swift roads and rigorous architecture replacing the jumble - in places dating back many centuries - laid waste by bombs, siege and battle. Rich with archival material and eye-opening ideas (many of which, perhaps thankfully, never came to pass), A Blessing in Disguise focuses on Germany, Holland, the UK and Russia.

Published by DOM (opens in new tab), €98

Book of A Blessing in Disguise : War and Town Planning in Europe 1940-1945

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: The imagined future of Manchester

From the book: The imagined future of Manchester, '2045 A.D.', admittedly, as the planner writes, 'merely a flight of fancy, intended to remind you that Manchester will in any case be a much altered place by the year 2045'. © Nicholas, 1945

(Image credit: TBC)

View of Rotterdam after the bombing

Rotterdam after the bombing. View in the direction of the Oostplein, where one of the few remaining windmills miraculously escaped destruction (only to fall victim to a fire in the 1950s). © Maria Austria Instituut, Amsterdam.

(Image credit: Eva Besnyo)

Pretty Pictures
By Marian Bantjes

Graphic artist Marian Bantjes has blazed a singular path throughout her career (creating a cover and a sailboat for Wallpaper* in the process). This retrospective reveals the origins and processes behind her major projects, explaining how her organic, calligraphic aesthetic brings together the analogue and the digital.

Published by Thames & Hudson (opens in new tab),  £42

Book of Pretty Pictures

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: 'Er will mich / er will mich nicht / geliebte

(Image credit: TBC)

View of 'Hallowe'en'

'Hallowe'en', 2005, celebrates Bantjes darker side

(Image credit: TBC)

Beautiful Lego
By Mike Doyle

Few companies have made the transition into the digital age as seamlessly as Lego. Now sitting astride a global brand that manages to embrace both the original plastic toys and a vast virtual realm - helped by a clutch of canny licenses - Lego has managed to retain its appeal to enthusiasts from the architectural to the technical. Beautiful Lego chronicles hundreds of fan-inspired artworks, all of which demonstrate the toy's enduring appeal and the sheer flexibility offered by its inexhaustible global supply.

Published by No Starch Press (opens in new tab), $29.95

Book of Beautiful Lego

(Image credit: TBC)

From the book: 'Rearing Stallion'

From the book: 'Rearing Stallion', by Tim Goddard, 2011. © The artist

(Image credit: TBC)

View of 'Doc Edgerton'

'Doc Edgerton', by Tom Simon, 2010. © The artist

(Image credit: TBC)

Jonathan Bell has written for Wallpaper* magazine since 1999, covering everything from architecture and transport design to books, tech and graphic design. He is now the magazine’s Transport and Technology Editor. Jonathan has written and edited 15 books, including Concept Car Design, 21st Century House, and The New Modern House. He is also the host of Wallpaper’s first podcast.