Time frame: a Swedish architect puts a spin on Bravur

Bravur watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Bravur x Wingårdh Limited Edition
11 December

Swedish architecht Gert Wingårdh and his son, Rasmus, have partnered with Swedish watch brand Bravur in a rethinking of their clean and minimal silhouettes. The design looks to fishing as an inspiration, tracing the curves on the dial, strap and back side in a geometric fish scale pattern. The result, available in both a light and dark version, brilliantly plays with light while keeping the pared-back style the brand is known for. 

Writer: Hannah Silver

Reservoir watches

(Image credit: Bravur)

Reservoir Tiefenmesser Bronze Plume
5 October

French watch brand Reservoir has collaborated with Paris-brand artisans Atelier M. Marceau to create an elegant series of feather watch bracelets. Plumassier Maxime Leroy - whose customers inculde Chanel, Givenchy and Jean Paul Gaultier - has woven rooster feathers onto leather, braided diagonally in a traditional take. The feathers become a chic foil for the sporty timepiece which uses retrograde minutes and jumping hours to offer a contemporary reading of time.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Hermes watch


(Image credit: Bravur)

Hermès Arceau Lift
9 September

The gentle curve of a stirrup was the original inspiration for Henri d’Origny upon designing the first Hermès Arceau model in 1978. Subtly rounded, the stirrup’s outlines became the lugs of the Arceau in a rounded silhouette which still characterises the watch today. The newest member of the family, the Arceau Lift, adds a highly technical edge with a double-gong minute-repeater mechanism - which strikes a pleasing note - and the flying tourbillon complication. The tourbillon itself is sculpted into the shape of an H which nods to the design of Hermès’ Faubourg Saint-Honoré boutique, the pattern of the wrought ironwork echoed in the carriage and bridge.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Jaeger lecoultre watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Grande Tradition Calibre 945
8 July

Creating a watch that hits the right note is a huge technical accomplishment; indeed, the minute repeater - a watch that also acts as a miniature musical instrument - is thought by many to be one of the most complex complications there is. Unfazed, Jaeger-LeCoultre have created many chiming watches over the last 150 years, working continuously to improve the accuracy and performance of their timepieces. A silent strike governor introduced 125 years ago works to quieten background noise so the charms can be heard more clearly; synthetic sapphire crystal were introduced on to the gongs in 2005 to act as an amplifier. This latest incarnation adds astronomical accomplishments to its aural ones, marking the pattern of the constellations in intricate filigree. A star chart portrays the brilliance of the Northern Hemisphere night sky, positioned as if we are observing from Jaeger-LeCoultre’s home in the Vallée de Joux.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Richard mille watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Richard Mille RM 61-01 Ultimate Edition Yohan Blake
26 June

The collaborators Richard Mille invite for their special editions range from artists or ballet dancers, to actors. Athletes, however, make up the core of their partnerships: requiring an intricate level of technicality without a compromise in style, the brand is a natural fit for their very specific requirements. Jamaican sprinter Yohan Blake has worked with Richard Mille since 2012 and sports the RM 59-01, another in this family of watches. Its sleek, clean lines and a no-fuss silhouette promise not to distract him on the track. The Ultimate Edition builds on this original simplicity, with the bezel and caseback crafted from a unique weave of the brands own carbon and quartz for both extreme lightness and strength. Tweaking the outline of the watch itself so it becomes slightly off-centre, the longer side thus lies between 2 and 5 o’clock, ensuring there is no rubbing on the sprinter’s wrist.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Breitlng watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Breitling Superocean Heritage ’57 Limited Edition II
5 June

Originally launched earlier this year, Breitling’s Superocean Heritage ’57 Limited Edition tapped into the mood of the nation with its rainbow-themed design accents. Now, the brand have acknowledged this with a second blue-hued edition, with part of the proceeds donated to the charities supporting frontline healthcare workers in the most affected countries. The Superocean originally appeared in 1957 and, as a dive watch, legibility was the key factor behind its clean design. With its cheerful new rainbow update, there is even less danger of overlooking the time.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Jaeger lecoultre watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Control Date
13 May

Jaeger-LeCoultre’s signature restrained aesthetic is encapsulated in the Master Control collection, which incorporates design accents from their classic round watches from the Fifties. Created in 1992, the Master Control collection was named after a new rigorous control process brought in to test every aspect of the watch, not just the movement as had been the case previously. The relaunched collection is just as faithful to stringent technical codes, whilst rethinking elements of its design. Updating the new pieces are triangular indices and the silvery hues of sunray brushed dials, for both elegant and contemporary results.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Sublet watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Hublot Big Bang GMT All Black Yohji Yamamoto
4 May

Hublot chairman Jean-Claude Biver has long championed collaborations with artists, noting in the past that by incorporating art into a timepiece it will remain permanently relevant. Their latest partnership marks the opening of Hublot’s new flagship boutique in Tokyo, an occasion for which the brand approached Japanese fashion designer Yohji Yamamoto. The all-black aesthetic nods to the creative past of both designers, uniting the All Black collection Hublot unveiled in 2006 with Yamamoto’s own avant-garde Black Shock in the Eighties. This new piece, naturally, is all black, from the ceramic case to the smoked sapphire crystal and rubber strap. Yamamoto, too, has added in personally useful details, with the watch easily able to display the timezones of Paris and New York, the cities in which he is based. ‘Moreover, the hours are invisible,’ Yamamoto adds. ‘As a person who isn’t always forthcoming, I find that highly amusing.’

Writer: Hannah Silver

March lab watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

March LA.B AM89 Magnum
28 April

French watch brand March LA.B epitomise understatement, producing watches characterised by a restrained design aesthetic. Here, classic stainless steel is boosted by carefully considered vintage detailing which stops this brand from slipping under the radar. In the new AM89 Magnum, design accents nod to horological heritage, while generously oversized indexes and a brushed or sunray dial available in a range of hues make this one of their most easily wearable pieces yet.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Gucci watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Gucci Grip
22 April

Gucci’s Grip watch delighted fans of classical watch design upon its release last year. Paying a stylish tribute to Gerald Genta’s ubiquitous designs of the Seventies, it added in a reworking of the digital-style display for an identity all its own. This year’s new style keeps these details, with the vintage-shaped dial and three windows still the main focus, but a sleek grey PVD case makes this the Grip’s most modern outing yet. The familiar stamp of the GG logo adds a playful touch – and we’d expect nothing less from the charismatic Italian brand.

Writer: Hannah Silver

H moser watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

H Moser Vantablack
17 April

An Instagram post on 1 April last year, announcing the release of a watch where both hands and dial were so deeply black the time was invisible, was a tongue-in-cheek April Fool’s from Swiss watch brand H Moser. The joke, though, was on them, and after a hugely positive response to the Venturer Concept Vantablack the brand realised they’d be missing a trick if they didn’t make it a reality. Vantablack, H Moser say, is the ‘blackest black ever produced by artificial means,’ and is created from carbon nanotubes thousands of times finer than a single human hair. Now, both dial and hands are cast in this black and every other superfluous detail disregarded – including logo and indices – making this an authentically pure ode to minimalism. In a response to the current situation, it is also one of the first pieces which are now available to buy on the brand’s site here.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Audemars piglet watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Audemars Piguet (Re)master01
3 April

Every new timepiece is rife with historical references, knowingly or unknowingly paying tribute to the design greats who have come before them with simple and effective design ticks. The new Audemars Piguet (Re)master01 is directly inspired by the past, somewhat surprisingly eschewing the more obvious Seventies – arguably one of the most exciting times for watch design – and focusing instead on one of their extremely rare chronographs from 1943. The new piece stays faithful to the original, keeping the same two-tone aesthetic with the retro gold-toned dial and pink gold detailing. The already generous watch dimensions are here increased again, improving the legibility of the elegant Art Deco-inspired numerals.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Hamilton watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Hamilton PSR
20 March

Hamilton’s unveiling of the first digital electronic wristwatch in 1970 fascinated viewers who watched it being tested on The Tonight Show. Host Johnny Carson demonstrated how pushing the button on the side made the time flash in red LED; holding it down for longer revealed the seconds. Two years later upon its official release, Elvis Presley was one of those quick to snap up one of the 400 models, then the same price as a family car. This new version, available in both stainless steel and in stainless steel coated with yellow gold PVD – our favourite – pays tribute to these historical references with its familiar cushion shape, but updates the design. The time display can now be viewed in both LCD (liquid crystal display) and OLED (organic light emitting diodes), which in short means the time is now also visible in daylight without the need to press a button. The lack of a backlight keeps energy consumption low, and thus this retro tribute to groundbreaking technology ticks along efficiently – or rather, it doesn’t.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Tag watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Tag Heuer Connected
13 March

As smartwatches seem to be here to stay – for now – so their design continues to evolve. The third edition of the Tag Heuer Connected is a case in point, or rather, stainless steel: with a silhouette that resembles that of the much-loved Carrera, it is the most familiar smartwatch yet. Functions are top-notch, enabling you to analyse your daily run and check in with your Google assistant all before your morning coffee. If it weren’t for these handy features, the chronograph design - including the sleek polished and brushed detailing and ceramic bezel - would make it easy to forget it is a smart watch at all.

Writer: Hannah Silver

A lange and sohne watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

A. Lange & Söhne Odysseus
28 February

There is something incredibly chic about a clean stainless steel watch. Once regarded as too heavy and cumbersome to be of use for anything other than purely functional wristwatches, watchmakers have since harnessed the power of stainless steel to create sleek pieces that are both stylish and exceedingly wearable. Take the Odysseus from A. Lange & Söhne, which marks the beginning of steel becoming an enduring part of the German brand’s roster. Plaits of brushed surfaces and chamfered edges, when juxtaposed against the multi-levelled brass dial, become both elegant and sporty.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Patek Philippe watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Phillips in Association with Bacs & Russo
20 February

A personal watch collection is inherently revealing, exposing the habits and affections of those who have patiently indulged their love of horology throughout the years. It is very special indeed when the collection belongs to someone who has directly defined the industry, and Jean-Claude Biver: A Retrospective. Share, Respect, Forgive promises to be a real treat. Jean-Claude Biver, the non-executive president of LVMH Group Watch Division, has assembled an eclectic selection of watches from Patek Philippe, Rolex, Omega and others, as well as being drawn to independents such as Philippe Dufour and Rexhep Rexhepi. The non-selling exhibition has toured the world for the last few months and, next week, will be on show at Phillips in Berkeley Square, London. It is a rare chance to see beautiful and exceptional pieces such as this Patek Philippe collection of the elegant 1518, 2499, 1579 and 96HU watches.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Bamford Girard perregaux watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Bamford Watch Department & Girard-Perregaux Cat’s Eye
12 February

Bamford Watch Department’s subversive watch restorations have slowly converted a slew of big watch brands who, while at first dubious, have since been won over by the cutting-edge style with which they award a familiar watch. Now, joining TAG Heuer, Zenith and Bulgari, among others, is Girard-Perregaux, who have given the customiser carte blanche to transform the Cat’s Eye. While the oval case is still instantly recognisable, there is a bold rainbow of twelve colour choices for the dial which, when paired with a textured strap in Epi grain leather, makes for an instantly contemporary result.

Writer: Hannah Silver

SevenFriday x Rocketbyz 31 January SevenFriday’s second collaboration with artist Tomyboy reinterprets the M3/01 watch in an unapologetic riot of colour. A case, layered with carbon and neon coloured resin, makes for a bold choice when offered in fluorescent pink, orange or green, and we would expect nothing less from a brand named after the most thrilling day of the week. Day or night, these watches are so bright you’ll need glasses to wear them – how appropriate, then, that each limited edition piece comes with its own pair of matching sunglasses. Writer: Hannah Silver


(Image credit: Bravur)

SevenFriday x Rocketbyz
31 January

SevenFriday’s second collaboration with artist Tomyboy reinterprets the M3/01 watch in an unapologetic riot of colour. A case, layered with carbon and neon coloured resin, makes for a bold choice when offered in fluorescent pink, orange or green, and we would expect nothing less from a brand named after the most thrilling day of the week. Day or night, these watches are so bright you’ll need glasses to wear them – how appropriate, then, that each limited edition piece comes with its own pair of matching sunglasses.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Longines watch

(Image credit: Bravur)

Longines Heritage Military 1938
19 December

The military watch from the Thirties that inspired the new Longines Heritage was typically understated; design details, although bold, were more easily spotted on second glance. They are referenced by today’s reinterpretation, and the decorated bezel and ribbed crown are both faithful to the original. A NATO-style strap in charcoal grey leather adds an appropriately modern military edge.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Zenith watch

(Image credit: Kayser & Schmuck)

Zenith Defy Classic Two Tone
11 December

The trend for bi-metal mixes has hovered around the horological universe for some time now. This year, Zenith has woven in an era-crossing sports-luxe 1970s vibe. The ultra-light brushed titanium case of the Swiss brand’s ‘Defy Classic Two Tone’ is elevated with an 18ct rose-gold bezel. The tech-infused Elite skeleton movement dial and easy-to-wear 41mm case makes it an elegant fit for most wrists.

Writer: Caragh McKay

Seven Friday watch

(Image credit: press)

SevenFriday T-Series
4 December

The new T-Series collection of watches from SevenFriday cut a noticeably thinner silhouette then the heavier watches we are used to from a brand that generally embodies a more industrialised style. The T2/02 plays with a retro aesthetic, incorporating smoky shades of brown and gold into the familiar clashing geometry of the face. New materials lend an edge, and a dial adapted from a sunglass lens gently distorts light while being transparent enough to reveal the skeleton movement within.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Bell and ross watch

(Image credit: Bell and ross)

Bell & Ross BR03-92
27 November

A watch described as luminescent often refers to the subtle glow of the numerals and indexes on the dial, a term which may need to be redefined with the release of the Bell & Ross BR 03-92 Full Lum. There is no understated glow emitting from this piece which coats its dial in fluorescent green Superluminova® paint. The rubber bracelet, too, incorporates pigments of the luminescent green into the rubber strap which is then moulded and pressed for crystal clear visibility. By day clean and uncluttered, there is no missing the brilliantly bright BR03-92 by night.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Panerai watch

(Image credit: Panerai)

Panerai Radiomir
20 November

Panerai has revisited its roots with the newest addition to the Radiomir collection. Originally created for the Royal Italian Navy, the watch began life as an instrument infused with Radiomir – a powder created from radium – with the purpose to light instruments’ dials. The new Radiomir California stays faithful to one of the early designs used during the Second World War, with the same unconventional mix of Roman numerals, Arabic figures and hour markers and no hint of the brand name, in keeping with military secrecy laws at the time.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Vacheron Constantin La Création du Monde

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Vacheron Constantin La Création du Monde
15 November

Vacheron Constantin’s just-announced partnership with the Musée du Louvre looks set to be a spectacular one if their last collaboration is anything to go by. In 2016 La Création du Monde, the 18th century clock, was painstakingly restored by Vacheron Constantin and was displayed in the Louvre: presented to King Louis XV in 1754, it is a rare example of both the precision and exquisite craftsmanship which characterised the era. For Louis Ferla, CEO of Vacheron Constantin, it joins two companies inherently concerned with archiving and conservation: ‘I enthusiastically welcome this collaboration between our two institutions, both centuries-old yet firmly rooted in the 21st century, as evidenced by the favour they enjoy among an audience of connoisseurs.’

Writer: Hannah Silver

HYT

(Image credit: press)

HYT Soonow Drop One
13 November

HYT’s avant-garde timepieces have garnered acclaim in the decade since their inception; by using fluid to tell the time, they weave together high technical accomplishment with a fantastically futuristic aesthetic. The Soonow Drop One continues in a similar vein but is one of the most complicated pieces yet, forcing the brightly coloured liquid to bend around the curves of the skull in a process contrary to the laws of gravity and – almost – watchmaking. Telling the time on this titanium dial studded with gold pins is a skill that must be learned, but we imagine that for the wearers of this watch, time is but a trifling detail.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Hublot

(Image credit: Kayser & Schmuck)

Hublot Big Bang
8 November

In its ongoing collaboration with embroidery house Bischoff of St Gallen, Hublot has added eight new designs for the ‘Big Bang’ watch to its ‘One Click’ interchangeable strap collection. This turquoise and sky-blue abstract braid design has been created on Italian silk organza using a bean stitch.

Writer: Caragh McKay

Tag

(Image credit: press)

Tag Heuer Monaco
1 November

It has been fifty years since the Tag Heuer Monaco made its appearance, making watch history with its water-resistant square case. It quickly became ubiquitous – first glimpsed on the wrist of racing driver Jo Siffert, it soon graduated to a starring role in Le Mans thanks to Steve McQueen’s enthusiastic endorsement. It is a moment worth celebrating, and it is one the brand has done in style by releasing five anniversary editions, one for each decade of its existence. This fifth and final piece in the series represents 2009 to 2019, and is the most stripped-back piece yet. Nodding to the black dial on the Monaco which originally appeared at the beginning of the decade, it also incorporates more modern design ticks; a sandblasted case in stainless steel lends a raw edge McQueen would have approved of.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Jaeger le coultre

(Image credit: press)

Jaeger-LeCoultre 'Lucky 13'
25 October

PhillipsGame Changers auction in New York on 10 December will feature the regulation rare Patek Philippe and Rolex watches (including a very nice 'John Player Special' Daytona estimated at $350-700,000), but stealing some of the thunder will be the LeCoultre 'Lucky 13'. Originally presented to Mercury astronaut (and later Senator) John H Glenn Jr by the Chicago Anti-Superstition Society, it marked his successful first US orbit in Friendship 7, the 13th space capsule produced by McDonnell Aircraft Corp. Uniquely, every hour is marked by a 13. The watch, on show in London until 28 October, has a US-made 'gold-filled’ case and is matched to a hand-wound LeCoultre K831/CW movement as used in the 'Quarter-Master' 24-hour dialled watches given to the Mercury astronauts by NASA.

Writer: James Gurney

Swatch

(Image credit: press)

Swatch exhibition
23 October

It would be no exaggeration to say Swatch’s irreverent designs revitalised the quartz watchmaking industry when they appeared in the Eighties. Bold and fun, a host of artist collaborations and witty, smart designs ensured they quickly became collectors’ pieces. Phillips Perpetual will be offering an impressive collection of their own this month, with over 200 unworn Swatch watches available to view and buy at the Phillips Perpetual showroom in London’s Berkeley Square from 25 – 28 October. Swatch, The All It Takes Is The Will To Do It Exhibition is a sale tinged with nostalgia, says Phillips international specialist James Marks. ‘In a world where brands were focused on classic design they tested the water for a fashion driven approach,’ he adds, a point that still stands. ‘Swatch revolutionised the theory that less is more.’

Writer: Hannah Silver

watch

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Dior Grand Bal Plume
16 October

The horological interpretation of haute couture, Dior’s Grand Bal collection of watches incorporate a wealth of precious materials, uniting delicate feather-setting skills with accomplished watchmaking abilities. Feathers are paired with diamonds, or zoisite with steel, for unexpected and intricate results. Here, the bold hues of the tiger eye stone and the speckled zoisite dials present a sharp contrast against the oscillating weight; functional yet still beautiful, it can be glimpsed in a swish of black feathers on the dial.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Nomos Tetra plum watch

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Nomos Tetra plum
4 October

The Tetra watch has been a mainstay of Nomos for a quarter of a century. For a brand that produces primarily round watches, it is unique in being characterised by sharp angles, both in the lines of the case and in the typography. Keeping proportions slim, both in the case itself and for the slender lugs which have been doubled to increase impact, means the end result cuts a bolder silhouette than the distinctive parts would suggest. The rainbow hues of the Tetra dial are always one of the most joyful and surprising elements, and this new autumnal deep plum is no exception.

Writer: Hannah Silver

watch

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Audemars Piguet Millenary Frosted Gold Philosophique
20 September

Audemars Piguet’s experiments with abstract notions of telling the time began in 1982 with the first Philosophique watch. It paid tribute to the first time-telling instruments which were equipped with a single hour hand: while less precise, they also lacked the relentlessness which pursues us today. It is to this sentimentality to which the new Millenary Frosted Gold Philosophique nods, defiantly eschewing precision by equipping it with a single hand only. Other design codes are more familiar – the diamond-dust effect of jeweller Carolina Bucci’s frosted gold finishing presents a beautiful juxtaposition to the hand-polished bevels on the case and lugs.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Bravur Geography Limited Edition

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Bravur Geography Limited Edition
11 September

Since its inception in 2011, Swedish watch brand Bravur has encapsulated Nordic cool, staying faithful to a core philosophy which focuses on simplicity. Their careful consideration of every design detail means the brand have long been on our radar, and we were excited to see how far they have come with their latest release. The Geography Limited Edition beautifully juxtaposes colours and textures, with a luscious forest green dial made classic by a gold and titanium plated case and elegant numerals.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Shinola Runwell Automatic

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Shinola Runwell Automatic
4 September

The Shinola Runwell Automatic is the mature older brother to the Shinola Runwell, released in 2013. It borrows design ticks from the original – the worn brown leather of the strap and gently rounded digits are reassuringly retro – but the automatic movement that drives it is wholly new, launching this piece into a more grown-up league. As we would expect, Shinola have done it on their own terms, inscribing the rotor with the familiar bolt logo in a nod to the Detroit cool at the heart of the brand.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Piaget Secret Water

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Piaget Secret Water
28 August

Piaget have flirted with Surrealist design codes in the past, dedicating a watch to Gala Dalí in 1973 which cut a distinctive asymmetrical silhouette. These beloved influences can be seen again in the Secret Water watch, where an undulating opal emerges from its textured pink gold fetters. The opal, a personal favourite of Yves G. Piaget, has appeared frequently in Piaget creations for the last five decades, and we can see why – here, the black opal is converted into a rainbow of colour, reflecting hues of yellow, green and blue.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Uniform Wares M42 Chronograph

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Uniform Wares M42 Chronograph
7 August

British brand Uniform Wares has gone from strength to strength in the decade since its inception. A focus on designing and developing all pieces from their London studio, combined with a distinctive clean design, has given them the edge. Its newest piece, the M42 Chronograph, is a case in point: technically impressive, it also incorporates new engineered finishes on the case, bezel and dial, for a masterpiece in tonal style.

Writer: Hannah Silver

BWD X Black Badger Fordite Tag Heuer Carrera Calibre 5 watch

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BWD X Black Badger Fordite Tag Heuer Carrera Calibre 5
24 July

Bamford Watch Department’s subversive collaborations twist conventional design codes. Since Tag Heuer authorised Bamford to make personal alterations for their customers, its new releases have increasingly pushed the boundaries of traditional watch design, and this latest piece is a case in point. The ten limited editions in the collection use Fordite, the overspray that builds up in the paint bays of car factories over the years, to create hypnotising and unique dials. The remains appeared at first to be lumps of paint; it is only when they are cut into that the swirling and random patterns inside are revealed.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Grande Tradition Répétition Minutes Perpétuelle

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Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Grande Tradition Répétition Minutes Perpétuelle
22 July 

Jaeger-LeCoultre’s minute repeaters succinctly unite technical mastery with an understated aesthetic, belying the huge specialist accomplishments at their heart. Continuing this tradition is the Master Grande Tradition Répétition Minutes Perpétuelle, an impressively slender addition to the 200 chiming watch calibers the Maison now counts in its inventory. Progressive the technology may be, but a gong that pays tribute to the distinctive tones of an antique pocket watch nods to the brand’s rich historical heritage.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Cartier Santos de Cartier

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Cartier Santos de Cartier
17 July

While horology’s ties with watchmaking are now well-established, it wasn’t always so. Cartier were one of the first to spot the potential in the new breed of pilots attempting to take to the skies, with Louis Cartier creating a wristwatch for his friend, Brazilian aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont in 1904. Santos-Dumont epitomised the hunger for progress in the early twentieth century, inventing the predecessor to the aeroplane and going on to design 22 flying machines. The watch Louis designed has been fine-tuned over the years, but the core principles, with their emphasis on simplicity and readability, remain the same. The familiar square silhouette is also still present, reflecting the symmetrical Parisian design codes of the time which were most famously epitomised in the four angular corners of the Eiffel Tower.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 10

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Harry Winston Histoire de Tourbillon 10
10 July

For the past decade, Harry Winston has been pushing both technical and aesthetic boundaries with the Histoire de Tourbillon collection, which concludes with the Histoire de Tourbillon 10, the tenth and final chapter in the story. Technically, it is spectacular, featuring an astonishing four tourbillons, each in their own rotating cage. The design has grown to accommodate them, with the case no longer rounded but rather cutting a sharp rectangular silhouette. Design ticks nod to the heritage of the brand, with subtle notches on the bezel referencing the sweeping architecture of the entrance to Harry Winston’s Fifth Avenue showroom. The rest of the design is perfectly symmetrical and surprisingly clean – the sculptural pair of sloping bridges supporting the case mount a dial crafted from a single piece of sapphire.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Nendo Buckle

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Nendo Buckle
28 June

Japanese designer Oki Sato of design studio Nendo has stripped the design of a watch back to the bare essentials for his third collaboration with Ten: Ten watch collection. A watch, usually consisting of a timepiece, wristband and buckle, is here reduced to just two parts. By fusing together the timepiece and buckle, Sato reduces the watch to the essentials only. Two different straps become one long belt, easily adjusted at the top of the wrist.

Writer: Hannah Silver

IWC Mark 11

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IWC Mark 11
21 June

IWC’s experiments in aviation-inspired horology go back seventy years. The first wristwatch they produced in the mid 1930s for civil aviation purposes set the precedent for technical innovations, being particularly resistant to oscillations in temperature. The Mark 11 which followed in 1949 was similarly acclaimed: recognised as a highly accurate navigational tool, it was supplied to the Royal Air Force. Now, IWC are celebrating seven decades of the Mark 11 Pilot’s Watch in style, hosting their first UK pop-up exhibition. Running until 10 August from their flagship New Bond Street store, visitors can discover 12 significant Mark 11 timepieces, as well as military uniforms and artefacts from the halcyon days of air travel. 

Writer: Hannah Silver

Patek Philippe Diamond Ribbon Joaillerie

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Patek Philippe Diamond Ribbon Joaillerie
11 June

Wallflowers need not apply for the Patek Philippe Diamond Ribbon Joaillerie, a gloriously bold interpretation of diamonds for men. The signature round silhouette of the Calatrava is a fitting foil for the hypnotising swirl of diamonds which make up the dial, arranged in graduated size so as to appear endless. Other details are pared-back - delicate numerals in blued gold appear to hover over the dial, while an increased case size creates more comfortable proportions for a watch comprised of 679 diamonds.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Nomos Tangente Sport

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Nomos Tangente Sport
4 June

Nomos has perfected its idiosyncratic brand of minimalism in the almost three decades since its inception, and its pared-down aesthetic is evident in the new Tangente Sport. It borrows design quirks from its popular sister, the Bauhaus-inspired Tangente, but alongside the ubiquitous typography and clean face there are sporty accents with an emphasis on strength. A case and bracelet made from surgical steel and a robust strap, composed of 145 individual parts, add a reassuring weight which not only make it near indestructible, but also pleasingly comfortable to wear.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Dior Grand Bal

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Dior Grand Bal
29 May

The functional becomes beautiful in the Dior Grand Bal Plume Wild, a family of watches which celebrate, rather than conceal, the remarkable technology at their heart. The oscillating weight of the movement becomes the graceful swirl of a ball gown; here ensconced in black feathers, it creates a pleasing textural jarring against veined blue stone.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Calvin Klein Glimpse

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Calvin Klein Glimpse
22 May

Taking its design cues from the Seventies, the sporty face on the Calvin Klein Glimpse pays homage to a decade which, while challenging for watchmakers, ultimately set the new cultural parameters of watch design. Sleekly rounded and with retro detailings, the Glimpse takes the brand's watch design in a fascinating new direction.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Andy Warhol Rolex

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Pop art
15 May

A  Rolex chronograph once owned by Andy Warhol is our highlight from the Christie’s Rare Watches auction held in Geneva earlier this week, which was previously sold with the rest of his watch and jewellery collection in 1988. Warhol had liked to store it in a dresser in his New York home within easy reach, all the better for enjoying its tactile nature. It is easy to see why the Rolex reference 3525 appealed – marrying steel and gold, its experiments with colour would have been familiar to the King of Pop Art.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Gucci Grip

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Gucci Grip
7 May

The new Grip by Gucci looks set to enter the brand’s roster of classic pieces, which succinctly capture the zeitgeist. A restrained, retro aesthetic and functional design ticks here nod fondly to Gérald Genta’s famed brand of luxury sports watch. The four new timepieces that comprise the Grip collection are sleekly functional, available in both yellow gold and steel. It’s the vintage chic marriage of burgundy calfskin and gleaming yellow gold that makes this the one for us.

Writer: Hannah Silver

TAG Heuer Carrera Calibre Heuer 02T Tourbillon Nanograph watch

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TAG Heuer Carrera Calibre Heuer 02T Tourbillon Nanograph
26 April

TAG Heuer’s Carrera Calibre Heuer 02T Tourbillon Nanograph is the maison’s most futuristic yet, now that a new carbon nanotube material has been developed for watchmaking in the TAG Heuer Institute. At the heart of the watch is a balance spring formed from a new material, a high-tech carbon composite that promises exceptional performance and shock-resistance. Naturally enough, the brand has chosen a suitably futuristic design for the new technology that plays on the hexagonal structure of the nano-scale carbon tubes at the heart of the composite. The new balance spring can be seen at the centre of the anodised-green aluminium tourbillon cage at the bottom of the dial, while the titanium case and carbon bezel add to the design’s all-round lightweight form. ‘This timepiece is a force of disruption in haute horlogerie,' says Guy Bove, TAG Heuer’s new product director.

Writer: James Gurney

Hublot Classic Fusion Chronograph Garage Italia Watch

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Hublot Classic Fusion Chronograph Garage Italia
24 April

Fusing the slick technological and design cues from both the motoring and horological worlds, the Hublot Classic Fusion Chronograph Garage Italia looks to the elements for its true blue design. The watch, the result of a collaboration with Garage Italia, unites Lapo Elkann’s contemporary styling with Hublot’s distinct brand of tough cool. Textures collide in a sky blue ceramic bezel, offset by a full rubber strap patterned delicately with ocean waves.

Writer: Hannah Silver

MB&F Legacy Machine FlyingT

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MB&F Legacy Machine FlyingT
18 March

MB&F’s legendary brand of avant-garde cool is thankfully still very much evident in its very first timepiece for women. The Legacy Machine FlyingT refuses to compromise on technicality and is the latest of creator Maximilian Büsser’s three-dimensional mechanical sculptures, featuring an eponymous 60-second flying tourbillon which hovers enigmatically over a central pillar. The result may be eye-catching, but telling the time itself is surprisingly intimate thanks to a clever angled elegant sub-dial that only the wearer can see.

Writer: Hannah Silver

Hublot Big Bang One Click Marc Ferrero

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Hublot Big Bang One Click Marc Ferrero
11 March

Hublot’s collaboration with Marc Ferrero is the latest in a long line of prolific partnerships. The Hublot Big Bang One Click Marc Ferrero depicts one of the artist's most renowned works, ‘Lipstick', on the dial, circled in spinels or topazes. Ferrero is renowned for  amalgamating different graphic styles, and this collaboration sees precious gems fused with functional technology. Naturally luxury is never compromised, however - the leather strap of Hublot’s patented one click fastening system has here been exchanged for sumptuous alligator and rubber. 

Writer: Hannah Silver

Van Cleef & Arpels

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Van Cleef & Arpels Sweet Alhambra
6 March

In 1968, Van Cleef & Arpels launched its first ‘Alhambra’ sautoir. This long-strand necklace was designed around the four-leaf clover-like motif that has become an emblem of the brand. A bejewelled play on the feel-good feeling that luck brings, the Alhambra design indeed proved to be a lucky strike for the French fine jewellery house – it remains Van Cleef & Arpels’ flagship design today. The emblem translates seamlessly into other forms, too, as the cocktail-style ‘Sweet Alhambra’ watch shows. By fitting the crown under the case, the clover silhouette remains graphically pure. Five new versions are launched this month, with a choice of interchangeable leather straps. This guilloché dial design, with layer upon layer of gold detailing, leads us to hope that our luck just might be about to turn.

Writer: Caragh McKay