Caruso hits all the high notes on Milan’s newly minted menswear mile

inside Caruso's new Milan store
Artist Giuseppe Amato in front of his latest wood creation inside Caruso's new Milan store.
(Image credit: Antonio Camera)

Milan’s Via Gesù - recently dubbed (opens in new tab)La Via Dell'Uomo (opens in new tab) - has quickly transformed into the city's official destination for exclusive, high-end menswear. The man responsible for the makeover is Umberto Angeloni (opens in new tab), a fashion entrepreneur who first anointed the road with its gentleman bent in 1998 when he opened the doors to Brioni.

Over the weekend, he cut the ribbon on the same road (which now features 15 other menswear specialists) to his latest pet project, Caruso. Lodged between fellow tailors Cacciari Salvati and Brioni, the new shop sits discreetly behind a series of elegant arched windows.

'When I bought the company six years ago,' Angeloni explains, 'we had 600 employees and today we have the same number. This is important when you look at the economic crisis that has occurred in Italy over the last 2-3 years.  We’re doing very well.'

Designed by Edgar Vallora, the interiors are clean and pure, but sharply attended to, such as a winter garden room with an airy glass ceiling. Caruso’s signature suiting hangs on oak racks and shelves, and against plaster walls with a hand-troweled finish. The floor, meanwhile, is a cocciopesto lime mortar with crushed pottery that was applied by hand by Veneto craftsmen who then oiled it on their knees (this laborious technique has notably been dormant for the last 200 years).

Best of all, however, is an art installation in the rear of the shop commissioned by wood artist Giuseppe Amato (opens in new tab), which recreates the Teatro Regio in Parma in wooden bas-reliefs, with mother of pearl chandeliers and an audience made of gleaming silver and gold metal people. Clearly, another jewel in the La Via Dell'Uomo's crown. 'Everything inside our shop is dedicated to excellence from Parma,' adds Angeloni of the Italian city that is home to Caruso's production, 'including the parmigiano and culatello we offered this evening.'

Caruso is fashion entrepreneur Umberto Angeloni's latest menswear project

Caruso is fashion entrepreneur Umberto Angeloni's latest menswear project. The flagship store sits discreetly behind a series of elegant arched windows

(Image credit: Press)

Designed by Edgar Vallora

Designed by Edgar Vallora, the interiors are clean and pure, but sharply attended to. Caruso’s signature suiting hangs on oak racks and shelves, and against plaster walls with a hand-troweled finish

(Image credit: Designed by Edgar Vallora)

Angeloni

'When I bought the company six years ago,' Angeloni explains, 'we had 600 employees and today we have the same number. This is important when you look at the economic crisis that has occurred in Italy over the last 2-3 years. We’re doing very well'

(Image credit: Press)

The floor is a cocciopesto lime mortar with crushed pottery

The floor is a cocciopesto lime mortar with crushed pottery that was applied by hand by Veneto craftsmen who then oiled it on their knees (the laborious technique has been dormant for the last 200 years)

(Image credit: Press)

shop is dedicated to excellence from Parma

'Everything inside our shop is dedicated to excellence from Parma,' adds Angeloni

(Image credit: Press)

the Teatro Regio in Parma

In the store's rear, Amato has recreated the Teatro Regio in Parma in wooden bas-reliefs with mother of pearl chandeliers and an audience made of gleaming silver and gold metal people

(Image credit: Press)

JJ Martin