'Meet My Project' exhibition at Studio Next, Milan

Portrait in a Chair
Akio Hayakawa's 'Portrait in a Chair' is one example that offers up a fresh idea; Hayakawa tilts just the back and seat for an otherwise traditional chair on a slight axis, giving it a creative spin
(Image credit: press)

With Milan (opens in new tab) overrun with many a young designer this week, it's hard to spot a wolf in the flock. Thankfully, the Parisian collective Meet My Project (opens in new tab) has done the hard graft for us by bringing together 30 bright talents from around the world to present the best that they have to offer.

Held at Studio Next (opens in new tab), the exhibition poses the question of how design interacts with the user, while also exploring the relationship between object and participant. With designers hailing from as far as Japan, Poland, Colombia and Egypt, the resulting products on show are wonderfully varied and address all manner of modern requirements.

Akio Hayakawa's (opens in new tab) 'Portrait in a Chair' is one example that offers up a fresh idea; Hayakawa tilts just the back and seat for an otherwise traditional chair on a slight axis, giving it a creative spin. Elsewhere, Philipp Sussmann's (opens in new tab) 'Happy Go Lucky' picture frame addresses a contemporary conundrum by allowing photographs of varying sizes to be displayed in one single frame.

Other highlights range from a trio of cone-shaped pendant lights, by Samuli Naamanka (opens in new tab), that have been cast from smooth porcelain, and even an electric scooter, complete with customizable parts and finishes, by Atsushi Onuma (opens in new tab).

Displayed together under one roof, Meet My Project, which has also had a presence in Stockholm and Paris since its establishment in 2010, makes an unequivocal statement: the future of design is shining bright.

Wood and Steal

This perpendicular lamp comes from Norwegian designer, Andreas Bersaker, who took inspiration from the cone-shaped Aspen tree. Entitled 'Populus Cone' the lamp is crafted from porcelain, wood and steel. The name of the product is taken from the Latin translation of Aspen, populus tremula

(Image credit: Andreas Bersaker)

This perpendicular lamp comes from Norwegian designer, Andreas Bersaker, who took inspiration from the cone-shaped Aspen tree. Entitled 'Populus Cone' the lamp is crafted from porcelain, wood and steel. The name of the product is taken from the Latin translation of Aspen, populus tremula

Chair is made from ecological materials

Japanese designer Hitoshi Makino's 'RECO' chair is made from ecological materials, using only recycled OSB (Oriented Strand Boards) wood

(Image credit: Hitoshi Makino)

Lamp Lueur de Bois

French designer Cedric Dequidt's towering lamp, 'Lamp Lueur de Bois', is made from wood, and won the 'Inner Light Out' Competition in March 2013 before joining the Meet My Project line-up at Salone this April

(Image credit: Cedric Dequidt)

Ceremonial burials

Polish designers Dizeno Creative's 'Ovo' is a ceramic egg-like urn purposefully designed to be biodegradable as a means of uniting ceremonial burials (the urn gets buried once filled with ashes of the deceased) and cremation in an enviornmentally conscious way

(Image credit: Dizeno Creative)

Electric Scooter

Atsushi Onuma is one of several Japanese designers exhibiting at Meet My Project. Onuma's tech-savvy Electric Scooter, 'Smacargot', is a 'communication tool' with detachable parts, allowing users to customise the product to suit their needs

(Image credit: Atsushi Onuma)

The Chair of Tree Thinning

Japanese designer Hiroshi Akutsu's motivation for designing this chair comes from the necessary act of thinning forests of trees to create a more hospitable environment for new woods to grow. Entitled 'The Chair of Tree Thinning', the chair is comprised laminated oak wood taken from forest thinning remnants


(Image credit: Hiroshi Akutsu)

Japanese designer Hiroshi Akutsu's motivation for designing this chair comes from the necessary act of thinning forests of trees to create a more hospitable environment for new woods to grow. Entitled 'The Chair of Tree Thinning', the chair is comprised laminated oak wood taken from forest thinning remnants

The Triagonal chair

The 'Triagonal' chair from German designer Markus Franke is made from wood and multiplex powdered steel. He chose contrasting materials to give the chair a stark and industrial feel

(Image credit: Markus Franke)

New Trail rug is comprised a geometric pattern

Artist Miwa Akabane's 'New Trail' rug is comprised a geometric pattern which has been transfered onto a carpet (and other interior products, such as wallpaper). The shape changes with different pieces - the inner white pattern expands

(Image credit: Miwa Akabane)

Finnish birch and powder-coated steel


(Image credit: Olli mustikainen and Jari Nyman)

Finnish design collaborators Olli mustikainen and Jari Nyman are the duo behind this 'Magi' bench. Made from Finnish birch and powder-coated steel, the seater doubles as a storage unit, with jagged shelves underneath which are ideal for slotting bottles, magazines or wood to ensure space is fully utilised

Smooth Ceramic Lambada


(Image credit: Samuli Naamanka)

Constructed from non-glazed ceramic, Finnish born designer Samuli Naamanka's 'Smooth Ceramic Lambada' lamps are sophisticated in look, as well as in concept. Naamanka wanted to create a ceiling lamp that was made entirely from one material, and with the help of manufacturer, Innojok - a company specialising in the design and production of lamps - have created these subtly stylish hanging lights

Happy Go Lucky frame

Philipp Sussmann's 'Happy Go Lucky' picture frame addresses a contemporary conundrum by allowing photographs of varying sizes to be displayed in one single frame

(Image credit: Philipp Sussmann)

A wooden chair

German designer Philipp Beisheim decided to conjoin everyday items with furniture, to create this mirror seat, 'Servus,' which is formed from solid oak

(Image credit: Philipp Beisheim)

ADDRESS

Studio Next
Via Francesco Crispi, 5
Milan

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Pei-Ru Keh is the US Editor at Wallpaper*. Born and raised in Singapore, she has been a New Yorker since 2013. Pei-Ru has held various titles at Wallpaper* since she joined in 2007. She currently reports on design, art, architecture, fashion, beauty and lifestyle happenings in the United States, both in print and digitally. Pei-Ru has taken a key role in championing diversity and representation within Wallpaper's content pillars and actively seeks out stories that reflect a wide range of perspectives. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two children, and is currently learning how to drive.