Wander down a small stretch of Clinton Hill, on the outskirts of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and you might detect wafts of fragrance emanating from behind a glass and blackened steel storefront.

It’s in these unexpected environs that perfumery Joya has set up home in a 19th-century rigging garage refitted by architect firm Taylor and Miller.

At the front stands a retail space demarcated by suspended panels of oak veneer and steel that hang down from the warehouse ceiling. Geometric alcoves were created for displaying products, a nod to Joya’s cast-and-mould method of creating its candles and ceramics.

Apart from its own wares, visitors can also peruse an edit of books, beauty and lifestyle objects that all share a similar ethos.

‘The fragrance industry is notoriously secretive and possessive,’ says Joya founder Frederick Bouchardy. ‘I am proud of my team’s skills and procedures, as well as the ingredients we use and suppliers we engage. So the goal is to let the operations and work speak for themselves, rather than having to market them.’

In addition to its hand-cast candles, soaps, ceramics, perfumes and diffusers, which are all made in the open-plan production facility behind the boutique space, Joya also offers tours of its atelier and factory. Bespoke fragrance consultations are available for extra-fastidious noses, and a series of fragrance workshops are also in the pipeline.

As originally featured in the June 2016 issue of Wallpaper* (W*207)