The work of Frank Gehry has revolutionised the way we see architecture, and a big, comprehensive retrospective of his work in Europe has been long overdue. The architect's portfolio, including iconic projects such as the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao (1997) and the Walt Disney Concert Hall (2003), features widely recognised landmarks in architectural history. 

So, the exhibition that just opened at the Centre Pompidou in Paris will be a welcome chance for professionals and architecture aficionados alike, to dip into the considerable body of the master's oeuvre. An earlier show around the architect's work in 1992 - also at the Pompidou - offered a taster of what was to come, however this exhibition aims to be bolder and bigger, 'a global survey of his work'. 

A staggering 225 drawings, 67 models and supporting material and a total of 60 major projects will be on display to present a detailed portrait of the architect's career, since he first started his office in Los Angeles in the early 1960s. 

Key projects such as his own world-famous house in Santa Monica, the Vitra Design Museum in Germany and 8 Spruce Street in New York will take the visitor to a journey that describes the development of the architect's design language throughout the decades. The show also revolves around two main themes: urbanism and the development of new systems of digital design and fabrication. 

The show opens at a key time for the office - Gehry's Museum of Biodiversity in Panama is also inaugurated this October and his Fondation Luma in Arles is currently on site, while the first ever permanent Gehry building in England has been announced recently as part of the Battersea Power Station development. At the same time, his seminal Louis Vuitton Foundation is also due to launch later this month. Watch this space. 

TAGS: FRANK GEHRY