The architecture projects reshaping Japan

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma
(Image credit: Takumi Ohta )

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma

Kengo Kuma and his team added a touch of organic design to the urban campus of the University of Tokyo with the Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building. Balancing out the campus' existing 'harder', geometric volumes, mostly made of concrete and stone, Kuma wrapped this educational building in a soft skin of undulating panels of wood and earth.

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta )

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma (opens in new tab) 
Kengo Kuma and his team added a touch of organic design to the urban campus of the University of Tokyo with the Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building. Balancing out the campus' existing 'harder', geometric volumes, mostly made of concrete and stone, Kuma wrapped this educational building in a soft skin of undulating panels of wood and earth.

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building

(Image credit: Takumi Ohta )

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma (opens in new tab) 
Kengo Kuma and his team added a touch of organic design to the urban campus of the University of Tokyo with the Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building. Balancing out the campus' existing 'harder', geometric volumes, mostly made of concrete and stone, Kuma wrapped this educational building in a soft skin of undulating panels of wood and earth.

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta )

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma (opens in new tab)(opens in new tab) 
Kengo Kuma and his team added a touch of organic design to the urban campus of the University of Tokyo with the Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building. Balancing out the campus' existing 'harder', geometric volumes, mostly made of concrete and stone, Kuma wrapped this educational building in a soft skin of undulating panels of wood and earth.

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta )

Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building, Tokyo by Kengo Kuma (opens in new tab)(opens in new tab) 
Kengo Kuma and his team added a touch of organic design to the urban campus of the University of Tokyo with the Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building. Balancing out the campus' existing 'harder', geometric volumes, mostly made of concrete and stone, Kuma wrapped this educational building in a soft skin of undulating panels of wood and earth.

Omiyamae Gymnasium, Tokyo by Jun Aoki


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Omiyamae Gymnasium, Tokyo by Jun Aoki (opens in new tab) 
One of Jun Aoki's most recently works is the Omiyamae Gymnasium in Tokyo, the winning entry of a very popular open competition in 2008. Aoki responded to the brief for an environmental friendly sports and fitness hub that is 'beyond generations' in a quiet residential neighborhood, by creating a semi-sunken volume that carries a public park on top. To attract the local community, the buffer zones between the swimming pool and sports arena inside the circular volume contain facilities that are open to all, such as café, spaces for children, yoga and meeting rooms.

Omiyamae Gymnasium

(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Omiyamae Gymnasium, Tokyo by Jun Aoki (opens in new tab) 
One of Jun Aoki's most recently works is the Omiyamae Gymnasium in Tokyo, the winning entry of a very popular open competition in 2008. Aoki responded to the brief for an environmental friendly sports and fitness hub that is 'beyond generations' in a quiet residential neighborhood, by creating a semi-sunken volume that carries a public park on top. To attract the local community, the buffer zones between the swimming pool and sports arena inside the circular volume contain facilities that are open to all, such as café, spaces for children, yoga and meeting rooms.

Omiyamae Gymnasium, Tokyo by Jun Aoki


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Omiyamae Gymnasium, Tokyo by Jun Aoki (opens in new tab) 
One of Jun Aoki's most recently works is the Omiyamae Gymnasium in Tokyo, the winning entry of a very popular open competition in 2008. Aoki responded to the brief for an environmental friendly sports and fitness hub that is 'beyond generations' in a quiet residential neighborhood, by creating a semi-sunken volume that carries a public park on top. To attract the local community, the buffer zones between the swimming pool and sports arena inside the circular volume contain facilities that are open to all, such as café, spaces for children, yoga and meeting rooms.

Omiyamae Gymnasium


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Omiyamae Gymnasium, Tokyo by Jun Aoki (opens in new tab) 
One of Jun Aoki's most recently works is the Omiyamae Gymnasium in Tokyo, the winning entry of a very popular open competition in 2008. Aoki responded to the brief for an environmental friendly sports and fitness hub that is 'beyond generations' in a quiet residential neighborhood, by creating a semi-sunken volume that carries a public park on top. To attract the local community, the buffer zones between the swimming pool and sports arena inside the circular volume contain facilities that are open to all, such as café, spaces for children, yoga and meeting rooms.

Omiyamae Gymnasium

(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Omiyamae Gymnasium, Tokyo by Jun Aoki (opens in new tab) 
One of Jun Aoki's most recently works is the Omiyamae Gymnasium in Tokyo, the winning entry of a very popular open competition in 2008. Aoki responded to the brief for an environmental friendly sports and fitness hub that is 'beyond generations' in a quiet residential neighborhood, by creating a semi-sunken volume that carries a public park on top. To attract the local community, the buffer zones between the swimming pool and sports arena inside the circular volume contain facilities that are open to all, such as café, spaces for children, yoga and meeting rooms.

Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre


(Image credit: TBC)

Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre by Chiba Manabu Architects (opens in new tab)
As a consultant for the future development of Tsuruga, a city awaiting the arrival of the bullet train, Chiba Manabu Architects recently gained the commission for the new 1160 sq m Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre. The building pays homage to the old wooden station that was destroyed in 1945, but so loved among locals. By wrapping it in a glass skin and adding extra functions such as exhibition and event spaces, Chiba hailed a new era for the city's station.

Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre

(Image credit: Masao Nishikawa)

Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre by Chiba Manabu Architects (opens in new tab)
As a consultant for the future development of Tsuruga, a city awaiting the arrival of the bullet train, Chiba Manabu Architects recently gained the commission for the new 1160 sq m Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre. The building pays homage to the old wooden station that was destroyed in 1945, but so loved among locals. By wrapping it in a glass skin and adding extra functions such as exhibition and event spaces, Chiba hailed a new era for the city's station.

Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre

(Image credit: Masao Nishikawa)

Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre by Chiba Manabu Architects (opens in new tab)
As a consultant for the future development of Tsuruga, a city awaiting the arrival of the bullet train, Chiba Manabu Architects recently gained the commission for the new 1160 sq m Tsuruga Station Multipurpose Centre. The building pays homage to the old wooden station that was destroyed in 1945, but so loved among locals. By wrapping it in a glass skin and adding extra functions such as exhibition and event spaces, Chiba hailed a new era for the city's station.

Shonan Christ Church


(Image credit: KOJI FUJII / Nacasa&Pertners Inc)

Shonan Christ Church, Fujisawa by Takeshi Hosaka (opens in new tab) 
A concrete shell featuring vertical ribs and strips of sound-absorbing black urethane foam forms Takeshi Hosaka's new Shonan Christ Church. The structural and acoustics solutions, made in collaboration with Nagata Acoustics and Ove Arup Japan, ensures that the pastor's speech sounds clearly throughout the sanctuary, while the hymns resonate softly.

Shonan Christ Church


(Image credit: KOJI FUJII / Nacasa&Pertners Inc)

Shonan Christ Church, Fujisawa by Takeshi Hosaka (opens in new tab) 
A concrete shell featuring vertical ribs and strips of sound-absorbing black urethane foam forms Takeshi Hosaka's new Shonan Christ Church. The structural and acoustics solutions, made in collaboration with Nagata Acoustics and Ove Arup Japan, ensures that the pastor's speech sounds clearly throughout the sanctuary, while the hymns resonate softly.

Shonan Christ Church


(Image credit: KOJI FUJII / Nacasa&Pertners Inc)

Shonan Christ Church, Fujisawa by Takeshi Hosaka (opens in new tab) 
A concrete shell featuring vertical ribs and strips of sound-absorbing black urethane foam forms Takeshi Hosaka's new Shonan Christ Church. The structural and acoustics solutions, made in collaboration with Nagata Acoustics and Ove Arup Japan, ensures that the pastor's speech sounds clearly throughout the sanctuary, while the hymns resonate softly.

Shonan Christ Church

(Image credit: KOJI FUJII / Nacasa&Pertners Inc)

Shonan Christ Church

(Image credit: KOJI FUJII / Nacasa&Pertners Inc)

Shonan Christ Church, Fujisawa by Takeshi Hosaka (opens in new tab) 
A concrete shell featuring vertical ribs and strips of sound-absorbing black urethane foam forms Takeshi Hosaka's new Shonan Christ Church. The structural and acoustics solutions, made in collaboration with Nagata Acoustics and Ove Arup Japan, ensures that the pastor's speech sounds clearly throughout the sanctuary, while the hymns resonate softly.

Shonan Christ Church

(Image credit: KOJI FUJII / Nacasa&Pertners Inc)

Shonan Christ Church, Fujisawa by Takeshi Hosaka (opens in new tab) 
A concrete shell featuring vertical ribs and strips of sound-absorbing black urethane foam forms Takeshi Hosaka's new Shonan Christ Church. The structural and acoustics solutions, made in collaboration with Nagata Acoustics and Ove Arup Japan, ensures that the pastor's speech sounds clearly throughout the sanctuary, while the hymns resonate softly.

Shonan Christ Church

(Image credit: KOJI FUJII / Nacasa&Pertners Inc)

Shonan Christ Church, Fujisawa by Takeshi Hosaka (opens in new tab) 
A concrete shell featuring vertical ribs and strips of sound-absorbing black urethane foam forms Takeshi Hosaka's new Shonan Christ Church. The structural and acoustics solutions, made in collaboration with Nagata Acoustics and Ove Arup Japan, ensures that the pastor's speech sounds clearly throughout the sanctuary, while the hymns resonate softly.

Komanchi Building


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Komanchi Building, Tokyo by Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects (opens in new tab)
Using a unifying façade infused with traditional Japanese elements (including vertical latticework, called tategoshi), Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects recently completed the Komachi Building in Tokyo for developers Time Zone. The owners aim to attract hospitality tenants. Shitomido-style shutters that swing open out and up are incorporated in the overall vertical latticework to gives the façade depth.

Komanchi Building


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Komanchi Building, Tokyo by Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects (opens in new tab)
Using a unifying façade infused with traditional Japanese elements (including vertical latticework, called tategoshi), Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects recently completed the Komachi Building in Tokyo for developers Time Zone. The owners aim to attract hospitality tenants. Shitomido-style shutters that swing open out and up are incorporated in the overall vertical latticework to gives the façade depth.

Komanchi Building

(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Komanchi Building, Tokyo by Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects (opens in new tab)
Using a unifying façade infused with traditional Japanese elements (including vertical latticework, called tategoshi), Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects recently completed the Komachi Building in Tokyo for developers Time Zone. The owners aim to attract hospitality tenants. Shitomido-style shutters that swing open out and up are incorporated in the overall vertical latticework to gives the façade depth.

Komanchi Building


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Komanchi Building, Tokyo by Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects (opens in new tab)
Using a unifying façade infused with traditional Japanese elements (including vertical latticework, called tategoshi), Akira Koyama of Key Operation Inc / Architects recently completed the Komachi Building in Tokyo for developers Time Zone. The owners aim to attract hospitality tenants. Shitomido-style shutters that swing open out and up are incorporated in the overall vertical latticework to gives the façade depth.

Commercial building


(Image credit: Takumi Ohta)

Commercial building, Fukuoka by Junichiro Ikeura (opens in new tab) 
This two-story commercial space next to Fukutsu station in the Fukuoka Prefecture is an ode to the triangle. The triangular building makes the most out of the triangular plot. Design by Junichiro Ikeura and his studio, Dabura, it features a wooden lattice of triangles, covered with similarly shaped windows and galbarium panels - a type of steel plate. The result is a small but elegant building that will undoubtedly boost the profile of its surrounding area.

Commercial building

(Image credit: Satoshi Ikuma (Techni Staff))

Commercial building, Fukuoka by Junichiro Ikeura (opens in new tab) 
This two-story commercial space next to Fukutsu station in the Fukuoka Prefecture is an ode to the triangle. The triangular building makes the most out of the triangular plot. Design by Junichiro Ikeura and his studio, Dabura, it features a wooden lattice of triangles, covered with similarly shaped windows and galbarium panels - a type of steel plate. The result is a small but elegant building that will undoubtedly boost the profile of its surrounding area.

Commercial building


(Image credit: Satoshi Ikuma (Techni Staff))

Commercial building, Fukuoka by Junichiro Ikeura (opens in new tab) 
This two-story commercial space next to Fukutsu station in the Fukuoka Prefecture is an ode to the triangle. The triangular building makes the most out of the triangular plot. Design by Junichiro Ikeura and his studio, Dabura, it features a wooden lattice of triangles, covered with similarly shaped windows and galbarium panels - a type of steel plate. The result is a small but elegant building that will undoubtedly boost the profile of its surrounding area.

Commercial building


(Image credit: Satoshi Ikuma (Techni Staff))

Commercial building, Fukuoka by Junichiro Ikeura  This two-story commercial space next to Fukutsu station in the Fukuoka Prefecture is an ode to the triangle. The triangular building makes the most out of the triangular plot. Design by Junichiro Ikeura and his studio, Dabura, it features a wooden lattice of triangles, covered with similarly shaped windows and galbarium panels - a type of steel plate. The result is a small but elegant building that will undoubtedly boost the profile of its surrounding area.

Commercial building


(Image credit: Satoshi Ikuma (Techni Staff))

Commercial building, Fukuoka by Junichiro Ikeura  

This two-story commercial space next to Fukutsu station in the Fukuoka Prefecture is an ode to the triangle. The triangular building makes the most out of the triangular plot. Design by Junichiro Ikeura and his studio, Dabura, it features a wooden lattice of triangles, covered with similarly shaped windows and galbarium panels - a type of steel plate. The result is a small but elegant building that will undoubtedly boost the profile of its surrounding area.

Ichihara Lakeside Museum


(Image credit: Tadashi Endo)

Ichihara Lakeside Museum by Kawaguchi Tei Architects

The concrete structure was the only thing Kawaguchi Tei Architects re-used from the existing postmodern building on site, during their extensive renovation of this municipal facility an hour's drive from Tokyo. By stripping the building of its curtain walls, glazed roof and layers of paint, and with the addition of steel splints that define the internal spaces, the building recently reopened to the public as Ichihara Lakeside Museum.

Ichihara Lakeside Museum


(Image credit: Tadashi Endo)

Ichihara Lakeside Museum by Kawaguchi Tei Architects 

The concrete structure was the only thing Kawaguchi Tei Architects re-used from the existing postmodern building on site, during their extensive renovation of this municipal facility an hour's drive from Tokyo. By stripping the building of its curtain walls, glazed roof and layers of paint, and with the addition of steel splints that define the internal spaces, the building recently reopened to the public as Ichihara Lakeside Museum.

Ichihara Lakeside Museum


(Image credit: Tadashi Endo)

Ichihara Lakeside Museum by Kawaguchi Tei Architects 

The concrete structure was the only thing Kawaguchi Tei Architects re-used from the existing postmodern building on site, during their extensive renovation of this municipal facility an hour's drive from Tokyo. By stripping the building of its curtain walls, glazed roof and layers of paint, and with the addition of steel splints that define the internal spaces, the building recently reopened to the public as Ichihara Lakeside Museum.

Ichihara Lakeside Museum


(Image credit: Tadashi Endo)

Ichihara Lakeside Museum by Kawaguchi Tei Architects  

The concrete structure was the only thing Kawaguchi Tei Architects re-used from the existing postmodern building on site, during their extensive renovation of this municipal facility an hour's drive from Tokyo. By stripping the building of its curtain walls, glazed roof and layers of paint, and with the addition of steel splints that define the internal spaces, the building recently reopened to the public as Ichihara Lakeside Museum.

Ichihara Lakeside Museum


(Image credit: Tadashi Endo)

Ichihara Lakeside Museum by Kawaguchi Tei Architects 

 The concrete structure was the only thing Kawaguchi Tei Architects re-used from the existing postmodern building on site, during their extensive renovation of this municipal facility an hour's drive from Tokyo. By stripping the building of its curtain walls, glazed roof and layers of paint, and with the addition of steel splints that define the internal spaces, the building recently reopened to the public as Ichihara Lakeside Museum.

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion


(Image credit: Daici Ano)

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion, Kyoto by Ryue Nishizawa (opens in new tab) and Nendo (opens in new tab)
Located on the sloped campus of the Kyoto University of Art and Design, this new open air pavilion's roof, designed by Ryue Nishizawa, references walking in the mountains underneath a thick tree cover. Design office Nendo completed the experience by adding metal mushroom-like stools that appear to grow naturally from the earth.

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion

(Image credit: Daici Ano)

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion, Kyoto by Ryue Nishizawa (opens in new tab) and Nendo (opens in new tab)
Located on the sloped campus of the Kyoto University of Art and Design, this new open air pavilion's roof, designed by Ryue Nishizawa, references walking in the mountains underneath a thick tree cover. Design office Nendo completed the experience by adding metal mushroom-like stools that appear to grow naturally from the earth.

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion


(Image credit: Daici Ano)

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion, Kyoto by Ryue Nishizawa (opens in new tab) and Nendo (opens in new tab)
Located on the sloped campus of the Kyoto University of Art and Design, this new open air pavilion's roof, designed by Ryue Nishizawa, references walking in the mountains underneath a thick tree cover. Design office Nendo completed the experience by adding metal mushroom-like stools that appear to grow naturally from the earth.

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion

(Image credit: Daici Ano)

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion, Kyoto by Ryue Nishizawa (opens in new tab) and Nendo (opens in new tab)
Located on the sloped campus of the Kyoto University of Art and Design, this new open air pavilion's roof, designed by Ryue Nishizawa, references walking in the mountains underneath a thick tree cover. Design office Nendo completed the experience by adding metal mushroom-like stools that appear to grow naturally from the earth.

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion

(Image credit: Daici Ano)

Roof and Mushrooms pavilion, Kyoto by Ryue Nishizawa (opens in new tab) and Nendo (opens in new tab)
Located on the sloped campus of the Kyoto University of Art and Design, this new open air pavilion's roof, designed by Ryue Nishizawa, references walking in the mountains underneath a thick tree cover. Design office Nendo completed the experience by adding metal mushroom-like stools that appear to grow naturally from the earth.

Hammock Gallery


(Image credit: Kai Nakamura )

Hammock Gallery, Chikugo by Hirokazu Suemitsu+Yoko Suemitsu/SUEP (opens in new tab)
The donation of a series of camphor trees made Hirokazu Suemitsu and Yoko Suemitsu of SUEP decide to coordinate the design of the small Hammock Gallery with the placement of the trees in this station-front park. As a result, the building 'hangs' like a hammock between the trees. The building acts as a local hub, together with Kengo Kuma`s nearby Kyushu Geibun-kan museum, used for meetings and exhibitions.

Hammock Gallery


(Image credit: Kai Nakamura )

Hammock Gallery, Chikugo by Hirokazu Suemitsu+Yoko Suemitsu/SUEP (opens in new tab)
The donation of a series of camphor trees made Hirokazu Suemitsu and Yoko Suemitsu of SUEP decide to coordinate the design of the small Hammock Gallery with the placement of the trees in this station-front park. As a result, the building 'hangs' like a hammock between the trees. The building acts as a local hub, together with Kengo Kuma`s nearby Kyushu Geibun-kan museum, used for meetings and exhibitions.

Hammock Gallery


(Image credit: Hammock Gallery)

Hammock Gallery, Chikugo by Hirokazu Suemitsu+Yoko Suemitsu/SUEP (opens in new tab)
The donation of a series of camphor trees made Hirokazu Suemitsu and Yoko Suemitsu of SUEP decide to coordinate the design of the small Hammock Gallery with the placement of the trees in this station-front park. As a result, the building 'hangs' like a hammock between the trees. The building acts as a local hub, together with Kengo Kuma`s nearby Kyushu Geibun-kan museum, used for meetings and exhibitions.

Hammock Gallery

(Image credit: Kai Nakamura )

Hammock Gallery, Chikugo by Hirokazu Suemitsu+Yoko Suemitsu/SUEP (opens in new tab)
The donation of a series of camphor trees made Hirokazu Suemitsu and Yoko Suemitsu of SUEP decide to coordinate the design of the small Hammock Gallery with the placement of the trees in this station-front park. As a result, the building 'hangs' like a hammock between the trees. The building acts as a local hub, together with Kengo Kuma`s nearby Kyushu Geibun-kan museum, used for meetings and exhibitions.

a series of camphor trees

(Image credit: Kai Nakamura )

Hammock Gallery, Chikugo by Hirokazu Suemitsu+Yoko Suemitsu/SUEP (opens in new tab)
The donation of a series of camphor trees made Hirokazu Suemitsu and Yoko Suemitsu of SUEP decide to coordinate the design of the small Hammock Gallery with the placement of the trees in this station-front park. As a result, the building 'hangs' like a hammock between the trees. The building acts as a local hub, together with Kengo Kuma`s nearby Kyushu Geibun-kan museum, used for meetings and exhibitions.

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station

(Image credit: Nabura Tosasaga)

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station, Kuroshio by Bunzo Ogawa / Future Studio (opens in new tab)
The building's impressive wooden truss, plus the local delicacies it contains, are a key draw in Bunzo Ogawa's Roadside Station Nabura Tosa-saga in Kuroshio, Koichi Prefecture. With the truss, Ogawa not only references fishermen's huts (an influence in his design), but also produces a column free shop and restaurant inside, with large eaves outside.

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station

(Image credit: Nabura Tosasaga)

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station, Kuroshio by Bunzo Ogawa / Future Studio (opens in new tab)
The building's impressive wooden truss, plus the local delicacies it contains, are a key draw in Bunzo Ogawa's Roadside Station Nabura Tosa-saga in Kuroshio, Koichi Prefecture. With the truss, Ogawa not only references fishermen's huts (an influence in his design), but also produces a column free shop and restaurant inside, with large eaves outside.

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station

(Image credit: Nabura Tosasaga)

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station, Kuroshio by Bunzo Ogawa / Future Studio (opens in new tab)
The building's impressive wooden truss, plus the local delicacies it contains, are a key draw in Bunzo Ogawa's Roadside Station Nabura Tosa-saga in Kuroshio, Koichi Prefecture. With the truss, Ogawa not only references fishermen's huts (an influence in his design), but also produces a column free shop and restaurant inside, with large eaves outside.

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station

(Image credit: Nabura Tosasaga)

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station, Kuroshio by Bunzo Ogawa / Future Studio (opens in new tab)
The building's impressive wooden truss, plus the local delicacies it contains, are a key draw in Bunzo Ogawa's Roadside Station Nabura Tosa-saga in Kuroshio, Koichi Prefecture. With the truss, Ogawa not only references fishermen's huts (an influence in his design), but also produces a column free shop and restaurant inside, with large eaves outside.

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station

(Image credit: Nabura Tosasaga)

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station, Kuroshio by Bunzo Ogawa / Future Studio (opens in new tab)
The building's impressive wooden truss, plus the local delicacies it contains, are a key draw in Bunzo Ogawa's Roadside Station Nabura Tosa-saga in Kuroshio, Koichi Prefecture. With the truss, Ogawa not only references fishermen's huts (an influence in his design), but also produces a column free shop and restaurant inside, with large eaves outside.

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station

(Image credit: Nabura Tosasaga)

Nabura Tosa-saga roadside station, Kuroshio by Bunzo Ogawa / Future Studio (opens in new tab)
The building's impressive wooden truss, plus the local delicacies it contains, are a key draw in Bunzo Ogawa's Roadside Station Nabura Tosa-saga in Kuroshio, Koichi Prefecture. With the truss, Ogawa not only references fishermen's huts (an influence in his design), but also produces a column free shop and restaurant inside, with large eaves outside.

Ellie Stathaki is the Architecture Editor at Wallpaper*. She trained as an architect at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece and studied architectural history at the Bartlett in London. Now an established journalist, she has been a member of the Wallpaper* team since 2006, visiting buildings across the globe and interviewing leading architects such as Tadao Ando and Rem Koolhaas. Ellie has also taken part in judging panels, moderated events, curated shows and contributed in books, such as The Contemporary House (Thames & Hudson, 2018) and Glenn Sestig Architecture Diary (2020).