Home is where the art is: in Private Choice, a Parisian apartment doubles as a contemporary gallery

Inside an apartment with a small lounge featuring a white chair, black side table, two circular white lights attached to the wall, a small red chair. The room next door features two tall backed chairs with circular holes in their back centre.
Private Choice founder and project director Nadia Candet has asserted her curatorial taste on a Paris apartment once occupied by the family of film maverick George Méliès.
(Image credit: Théo Baulig)

If you happened to stop by the Private Choice preview (opens in new tab) cocktail in Paris on Saturday night, you would have had a hard time believing the apartment was actually a giant mise en scène. And the cinematic comparison makes a nifty double entendre; more than a century ago, the family of film maverick George Méliès occupied this building, adjacent to the city's garment district (his father was a successful bootmaker).

As a follow-up to last year's impressive staging – like this one, coinciding with the international contemporary art fair Fiac – Private Choice founder and project director Nadia Candet has asserted her curatorial taste on a residential space where a wide variety of artworks, furniture and design objects come together as a unified whole. Minus the Le Corbusier staircase, the lustrous Andrée Puttman light fixture and a few other pieces drilled into walls, everything is available for purchase. And yes, this includes the site-specific Felice Varini geometric perspective (opens in new tab) painting that will be custom re-created for the prospective buyer (at €50,000, it also happens to be the priciest item).

Candet has arranged the work in inspired juxtapositions: César fingerprint gold and platinum-accented china with Patrick Jouin for Puiforcat silverware (opens in new tab); Zaha Hadid's vases for Lalique within arm's reach from Sacha Walchkoff's teal astrakhan armchair for Pouenat. Connecting several pieces is a subtle theme of orientation. Above the upper-level entryway, for instance, Melik Ohanian (opens in new tab)'s neon art sign flashes '(T)HERE'. An 'X' marks the centre of Claude Closky's 'Ici [Here]' carpet in the library, positioned beneath Didier Faustino's 'Threesome Where' seating sculpture.

The inaugural edition showcased established and emerging artists separately, said Candet during an early walk-through. This year the integration makes a noticeable difference – particularly in the way people interact with the space. Some mingled around the Valentin Loellmann dining-room seating, as if in a home environment; others peeked intently into the bathroom to watch video art screened onto the turquoise wall. What they saw: a young duo that goes by the name None Futbol Club (opens in new tab) affixing 'Just Married' signage and tin cans to the back of a public bus.  

The projection might have been smaller than the vanity mirror, but the effect underscored that this was no ordinary house. Like in a gallery, several pieces had already been marked by red dots.

Apartment entryway with neon art sign and sideboard

Connecting several pieces is a subtle theme of orientation. Above the upper-level entryway, for instance, is Melik Ohanian's neon art sign '(T)HERE', from a 2006-2014 edition of five. On the sideboard are works by Florence Doléac and Claude Closky.

(Image credit: Théo Baulig)

Bathroom with turquoise wall and bathtub

In a video screened onto the turquoise wall of the bathroom, a young duo called None Futbol Club affixes a 'Just Married' sign and tin cans to the back of a public bus. The 'Nao' stool is by Studio Katra.

(Image credit: Théo Baulig)

Living space with chairs on rug

Didier Faustino's 'Threesome Where' seating stands on a rug by Claude Closky. The artwork on the wall behind is 'James Turrell Evolution 2', 2014, by Nicolas Delprat.

(Image credit: Théo Baulig)

Apartment geometric perspective painting

A site-specific geometric perspective painting by Felice Varini will be customised for the prospective buyer. At €50,000, it is the priciest item for sale at Private Choice. On the sideboard is 'Bright Cells' by Hitomi Uchikura.

(Image credit: Théo Baulig)