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Alfonso Simelio Jurado

FAU USP, Brazil

Architecture

Alfonso Simelio Jurado was born in Spain and kicked off his architecture education at the Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid. He completed his degree at the Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da Universidade de São Paulo (FAU USP) in 2010 and for the last two years he has been working for Metro Arquitetos, involved in large and prestigious projects like the new Leme Gallery and a new public school. He was awarded the 2011 Opera Prima Student National Award for his graduation thesis on student houses in Republica Square in São Paulo. 'My most important influence was my school and its own way of looking at architecture, which was partly inherited by modernist masters such as Vilanova Artigas and Paulo Mendes da Rocha,' says Jurado. 'Another great influence is Metro Arquitetos where I have learned most of what I know in the field.'

Most inspired by: 'SANAA, MVRDV and I would have loved to have worked with Foreign Office Architects.'

alfonso@metroo.com.br

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Alfonso Simelio Jurado

FAU USP, Brazil

Architecture

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Alfonso Simelio Jurado

FAU USP, Brazil

Architecture

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Aram Mooradian

Architectural Association, UK

Architecture

A five-year bursary-awarded student at the Architectural Association and a keen writer, Aram Mooradian has won the AA Writing Prize, the Dennis Sharp Award (2011) and edits Fulcrum, the AA's first student-run weekly, and the blog Architecture for the End of the World. 'I'm inspired by those irrational, unreasonable figures who refuse to change in order to fit the world, and who stubbornly insist on reacting against it: Rudolph Steiner for giving us the Goetheanum in Dornach, Karl Marx for a beautiful dream and Herzog & de Meuron for their passion for quality.' Mooradian's resume includes work experience at Herzog & de Meuron and the (former) Richard Rogers Partnership, while he is currently employed at Farshid Moussavi. His graduation thesis (pictured is an image from it) deals with the financial narratives of gold in relation to the culture of the Australian aboriginals. 'I graduated without ever having designed a building and I'm proud of that because I got to focus on the issues in the world that I think we can change,' he says.

Most inspired by: 'I've always felt that you are never really an architect unless you work for yourself.'

www.arammooradian.com

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Bethany Wells

Royal College of Art, UK

Architecture

Currently an assistant at South London's Moxon architects, where she has been working since 2007, Bethany Wells almost became a management consultant before deciding that architecture was her true calling. 'Architecture training gave me that exciting combination of prototyping and playing, while also making changes to the "real world",' she explains. A recent graduate from the MA Architecture course at the Royal College of Art, Wells had previously completed a degree at the Bartlett School of Architecture, winning the History and Theory prize and the prize for 'Distinguished work in Professional Studies'. At the RCA her work also stood out, winning the 'Will Alsop Award for Urbanism', a grant for a two month research and design trip, to commence in late 2011. A career highlight so far was building a tent sauna outside the Royal Albert Hall last year.

Most inspired by: 'Theatres; a dream collaboration would be with Richard Alston Dance Company. Or with an architecture practice like Lacaton Vassal who make big, clever, economical spaces for everyday life.'

bethany.wells@network.rca.ac.uk

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Carlos Piles, Povilas Cepaitis, Lluís Enrique and Diego Ordoñez

Architectural Association, UK

Architecture

This international group of architects joined forces at the Architectural Association in London. Their thesis, 'Cast on Cast, parametrization system and fabrication method' is 'a system for the construction of complex 3d surfaces out of simple stacked components'. With the first prize at the Holcim Awards 'Next Generation' in 2011 under their belt and a registered patent on their creation, the team's future seems bright. Piles currently works at Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands in London; fellow-Spaniard Monzo begins a doctoral thesis at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich; and Ecuadorian Ordonez and Lithuanian-born Cepaitis are both employed at Balmond Studio in London. 'We believe "Cast on Cast" will become a useful tool for the construction of complex geometries in the near future,' they say.

Most inspired by: 'The next step for us is to set up our own creative venture and multidisciplinary platform.'

www.castoncast.com

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Daniel Markiewicz

Yale School of Architecture, US

Architecture

Daniel Markiewicz is currently doing a Travelling Fellowship at Yale, looking at the 'utopian permutations, successes and failures of modernism in South Asia'. After doing his Bachelors at Princeton University, Markiewicz's masters has taken him on a seven month journey through India and Bangladesh. Before departure, he spent a year at Plan B Architecture Urbanism in New Haven. 'Architecture is not and will never be about any one particular thing,' the architect says, 'it is the careful negotiation of many ideas, influences, parameters, inspirations and constraints.' His graduation project, co-authored with Ryan Welch, looked at how the iconic city of Chandigarh might house its inhabitants without compromising the original vision. 'Architecture mustn't splinter into hyper-specific and isolated disciplinary niches,' says Markiewicz, 'it needs to celebrate its "Jack of all trades" value and quit trying to be a "master of one".'

Most inspired by: 'Reyner Banham, Le Corbusier, Kisho Kurokawa and Enric Miralles.'

dgmarkiewicz@gmail.com

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Daniel Markiewicz

Yale School of Architecture, US

Architecture

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Daniel Markiewicz

Yale School of Architecture, US

Architecture

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Emily Vo Nguyen

Cooper Union, US

Architecture

Vietnamese-American architect Emily Vo Nguyen is currently working for Diller Scofidio Renfro in New York, following her graduation from Cooper Union. 'One of the biggest lessons I took from architecture school was the idea that a piece of architecture can reinterpret its surroundings.' Her graduation project focused on monuments. 'The monument is part of the American collective unconscious,' she explains. By creating four abstracted yet physically solid models, Vo Nguyen explored the relationship between the souvenir and the monument. Inspired by the work of Mies van der Rohe, John Hejduk, Junya Ishigami, Francis Alys and Harun Farocki, Vo Nguyen cites sustainability as one of today's key challenges, as well as the need to use technology to 'improve both the design and the building process.' Finally, she looks for ways of allowing the 'program to reflect contemporary life,' a call for more flexible structures in a fast-changing world.

Would most like to work with: 'Peter Zumthor. But it's hard to pick.'

emilyvonguyen@gmail.com

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Emily Vo Nguyen

Cooper Union, US

Architecture

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Emily Vo Nguyen

Cooper Union, US

Architecture

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Ivan Bernal

South California Institute of Architecture, US

Architecture

After graduating from SCI-Arc, Colombian-born Ivan Bernal now works for Xefirotarch in Los Angeles. The 27-year-old took the 'best thesis' award in his graduating year, for his exploration of the relationship between shapes and recognition, an attempt to 'appeal to a broader audience outside the architectural field.' Of his studies, he says that 'I learned to never stop pushing the envelope.' Bernal comes from a family of architects and builders and draws much of his career inspiration from them. 'I have also been inspired by Immanuel Kant and the Peruvian writer Carlos Castaneda, as well as the architects Enric Miralles, Hernan Diaz Alonso, Eric Goldemberg and Thom Mayne.' And he throws in the critical writings of Jeffrey Kipnis and the cinematic visions of Christopher Nolan and Darren Aronofsky. His work has a fluid, organic quality. 'Everything today is designed at minimal cost and best performance,' he says, 'this limits the creative process of the field, and the speculation of different ways to operate. We need the freedom of the unexpected and we need to reach out and appeal to a bigger audience.'

Most inspired by: 'Morphosis.'

ivan.bernal.arch@gmail.com

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Jayashree Bardhan

Center for Environmental Planning and Technology, India

Architecture

Jayashree Bardhan graduated from the famed Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT) University Faculty of Architecture in 2011 with flying colours, including an exchange semester at prestigious ETH school in Zurich. Her thesis, 'Durga Puja Pandals: An Expression of the Public Sphere', comes highly commended from her professors; it focuses on the phenomenon of the local in Kolkata Durga Puja religious festival and its temporary structures. 'Over the years, I have developed a keen interest in the various processes of each particular place, its people and their impact on the built environment. Such observations and sometimes, active participation deeply influence me and in turn, my work,' says Bardhan. 'Additionally and in retrospect, I think the years I spent travelling around India as a child with my family have immensely contributed to my passion for the art of architecture.' Currently working as a research assistant at CEPT, Bardhan has also won the Pidilite Award for the Best Design for Environmental Architecture/ Ecological Architecture (Architectural Studies, 2010).

Most inspired by: 'Research and design projects that further my understanding of the negotiation between tradition and modernity to craft something that truly "belongs" to the place and time.'

jayashreebardhan@gmail.com

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Jonathan Gales

Bartlett School of Architecture, UK

Architecture

Jonathan Gales takes architectural fantasy to whole new levels. Having studied at both the University of Brighton and The Bartlett, the trained architect has turned his design eye to what he describes as 'speculative scenarios'. The result is a well-informed vision of a dystopian world of fiendish complexity, cinematic in scope but utterly believable. Also a founding member of digital collective Factory Fifteen, Gales is well placed to define the image of an alternative future.

Most inspired by: 'Fantasy writer China Mieville.'

www.factoryfifteen.com

[1303757766001]

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Leticia Wouk Almino

Yale School of Architecture, US

Architecture

25-year old Brazilian architect Leticia Wouk Almino graduated from Yale School of Architecture in Summer 2011. Currently working at Robert A.M. Stern Architects in New York, she draws inspiration from a mixture of art, film and architecture. Her architectural heroes include Mies van der Rohe and Herzpg & de Meuron, and the work of directors like Alfred Hitchcock, Michelangelo Antonioni, and Alain Resnais (all of whom used architecture and place as central motifs in their films). 'I learned that it requires much trial and error, not to mention toil and sweat, to achieve a result that is truly restrained and minimal,' she says. Her graduation project explored using bridges and paths as a means of framing a site and conveying the sense of a journey. 'Architects need to find new ways of representing their work,' she says, 'architecture needs to have a strong internal expression that mediates purposefully between inside and outside.'

Most inspired by: 'Herzog & de Meuron.'

l.woukalmino@ramsa.com

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Li Chen

China Academy of Art, China

Architecture

After graduating from the CAA in Summer 2011, 24 year old Li Chen set up an atelier, D+E&C+D studio, in Shanghai. Chen drew inspiration from his teacher at CAA, Wangshu, and also from the masters. 'Le Corbusier is my first teacher,' he says. 'The most important thing I learned from my studies is how to observe daily life and transfer it into my designs. Life determines the building's characteristics.' Chen's graduation project, 'Landscape of Society' looked at how land use shapes cities and culture (Chen was also a participant in the BMWi/Wallpaper* Sustainable Neighbourhoods project). Citing the Situationist International as another major influence, Chen believes that China's rapid urbanization is creating major challenges. 'I also think that the most challenging issue for contemporary architecture is how to re-define local identities,' he explains. His design proposal turned a prosaic urban side, adjacent to a busy highway, into a busy pedestrian intersection and dynamic architectural landscape.

Most inspired by: 'Thomas Heatherwick, because his ideas have illuminated a lot of different fields, including architecture, sculpture, urban infrastructure, product design exhibition design, and strategic thinking.'

lichen2031@yahoo.cn

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Li Chen

China Academy of Art, China

Architecture

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Louise Olsson

ETHZ, Switzerland

Architecture

Swedish architect Louise Olsson graduated in Spring 2010 and has subsequently taken up a post at the Swiss studio of Peter Märkli Architekt, her professor on the course. A student at the Zurich's prestigious ETH, Olsson has a pared down approach, using minimal markings and a distinct lack of ostentation in her presentation. 'You don't have to invent new things,' she says, 'it`s all there to reference and transform into today's language.' As well as Märkli, her inspirations include the spare, precise output of Swedish architect and designer Sigurd Lewerentz, the rigorous furniture and domestic architecture of Milanese designer Luigi Caccia Dominioni and the starkly monumental work of French modernist Fernand Pouillon. Asked about the challenges facing architecture today, Olsson replies that it's crucial to 'reinstall the importance of architecture'.
louiseolsson.01@gmail.com

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Marsha Silgardo

Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute of Architecture, India

Architecture

Combining work experience in some of the best practices in India, like Mozaic / Dean D'cruz Architects in Goa (in 2007), Mathew and Ghosh Architects in Bangalore (in 2008) and Samira Rathod Design Associates in Mumbai (in 2010), Marsha Silgardo recently completed five years of undergraduate study in architecture at Mumbai's Kamala Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture. Her design thesis won several design awards and documents soundscapes and their architectural representation. Silgardo is currently pursuing a four-month internship at Ranjit Sinh Associates in Mumbai. 'My main influences include architects like Steven Holl and Mies Van Der Rohe. I am also intrigued and influenced by the phenomenological approach to design of spaces,' she says. 'The Crematorium that I designed in my third year is definitely one of the highlights of my design work. My thesis, Resonant Memory, was also key as it kicked off a vast exploration project.'

Most inspired by: 'Steven Holl, Alvaro Siza, Gautam Bhatia, MVRDV and many more. But I am in a good place now with RSA.'

speed.marsha@gmail.com

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Marsha Silgardo

Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute of Architecture, India

Architecture

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Miho Tominaga

Tohoku University of Technology, Japan

Architecture

Based in Yokohama, Miho Tominaga is a graduate from Tohoku University. Tominaga's graduation work is densely layered, featuring whimsical but intricate drawings of multi-layered living spaces, using watercolour and hand shading to convey a sense of life and occupation. 'The main concept was time, and how human interaction with their surroundings changes this'. Despite having too many influences to list, Tominaga's work is fresh and original. Dedicated to the need to address context first and foremost, the young architecture student has already carved a distinctive aesthetic. Her graduation project proposed a wedding village atop an uninhabited island in Tokyo Bay, reconfiguring a long-abandoned defence base. The design ties together the memory of the former structures, the movement of the tides and the importance of time to the marriage ceremony.

tominagamiho00@gmail.com

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Robert Ware

Royal College of Art, UK

Architecture

Robert Ware started his education with two years in medicine before switching to architecture at the University in Nottingham in 2005. Graduating with First Class Honours in 2008 he went on to work for Leeser Architecture in New York - while also acting as a visiting lecturer at the University of Nottingham - before continuing his studies at the Royal College of Art. 'Taking apart my toys as a child inspired me to go into architecture,' he explains. His MA in architecture was completed with Distinction, scoring no less than three prizes; BD Class of 2011, WCCA Drawing Prize 2011 and New London Architecture Prize 2011. 'My work at the RCA focused on our intimate interactions with technology and its innate vulnerabilities, experimenting with progressive technologies that held a progressive outcome,' he explains. 'And one of the highlights of my design work so far was printing my final model on my own 3D printer.'

Most inspired by: 'Myself.'

robert.ware@network.rca.ac.uk

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Snezana Heidebrecht

Städelschule, Germany

Architecture

Following her studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main, 28-year old architect Snezana Heidebrecht has recently organised an exhibition for Tokyo Design Week, and is working at Klein Und Architekten in Frankfurt. Her graduation project looked at a design for an Urban Theatre, a multi-functional creative space, an 'Arts and Crafts' zone that uses a fragmentary structure to form a continuation of the stage, inside and out. 'I like the silence of Peter Zumthor and the innovative ideas of Diller Scofidio + Renfro,' she says. Heidebrecht spent time working in Moscow, which opened her eyes to the morality of architecture and the challenges of preventing architecture from being 'only a privilege for the rich minority.'

Most inspired by: 'If he was still alive, Piranesi. But mostly Dirk Friedrich.'

snezana.heidebrecht@meine-dateien.info

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Snezana Heidebrecht

Städelschule, Germany

Architecture

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Steven Baumann

Bartlett School of Architecture, UK

Architecture

'My interest in architecture is combined with an interest in sustainability, which is inclusive of both environmental and human welfare,' says Bartlett School of Architecture graduate Steven Baumann. 'I believe architecture and sustainability requires understanding varying social, political and cultural factors in tandem with more traditional environmental, technological and scientific approaches.' Originally from South Africa and following an MA in Architecture from the University of Edinburgh, Baumann is currently based in London. His recent collaboration with Post-Works studio, won them the Architecture Foundation's competition for 100% Design 2011. 'My work combines digital and hand-drawing techniques that often see the work moving between digital and hand-worked mediums several times during the composition of a drawing,' he says. 'The eighteenth century has been the place I've found myself looking to recently. I think there's nothing wrong with looking to the past to find ways of working in the present and designing for the future.'

Most inspired by: 'I am currently working at Foster + Partners but my ambition is to start my own practice in London.'

baumsp@hotmail.com

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Steven Baumann

Bartlett School of Architecture, UK

Architecture

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Tadashi Yamamoto

Kanagawa University, Japan

Architecture

Tadashi Yamamoto graduated from Kanagawa University with a masters in Architecture and Building Engineering. Now a freelance designer, the 25-year old believes strongly in the social role of the architect. After undertaking an extensive European archi-tour as part of his studies, Yamamoto has worked on various projects, including the 2011 Yokohama Triennale, a stint in the studio of Sogabe lab + Hari and designs for reconstructing the tsunami-hit Oshika while at the Archi+eid. His graduation project, 'Thinking from Thickness', attempted to give a functional agricultural structure the same solidity, density and tectonic appeal as a landscape. Citing influences as diverse as the American vernacular specialist Bob Easton and Le Corbusier, Yamamoto strives to make site-specific architecture. 'We have to consider environment, history, culture and climate,' he says.

Most inspired by: 'I'd like to work in an old studio, because new architecture can be built through studying traditional ways of working.'

r200502645@yahoo.co.jp

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Tony-Saba Shiber

Cornell University, US

Architecture

Tony-Saba Shiber graduated from Cornell in 2011 and went straight off on his travel fellowship, a study of contested territories around the world called 'the Politics of Edge.' The 26-year old has travelled widely to study urbanisation in all its forms, and 'how it has stemmed from diverse cultural, architectural, political, and ethnographic baselines.' The result has been a focus on what Shiber calls 'discordant spaces, the way by which politically-guided architectural thresholds are assigned and manifest themselves within contested territories.' His thesis explored design solutions for these apparently impossible sites, informed by the writings of Eyal Weizman and Michael Sorkin, amongst others. He also admires Zumthor's materiality, Eisenman's historical analysis and the design decisions of Herzog & de Meuron, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and West 8. Shiber foresees a tricky transition into an even more digital age, with architects faced with an increasingly 'loss of control over their design projects'. Without a closer relationship between human needs and digital design, Shiber feels that digital architecture will 'become nothing more than a surface treatment.'

Most inspired by: 'West 8, but I would also love to collaborate with several architects and theorists whose research touches on aspect of my own urban interests.'

tjs285@cornell.edu

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Tony-Saba Shiber

Cornell University, US

Architecture

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Tony-Saba Shiber

Cornell University, US

Architecture

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Victor Boye Julebäk and Ask Anker Aistrup

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Denmark

Architecture

V&A Architects was formed in 2010 by Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture graduates, Danish Ask Anker Aistrup and Swedish Victor Boye Julebak. Both partners currently teach at the School's department for Cultural Heritage, as well as pursue their own work, while they have both been recipients of several prizes and awards, such as the Kalmer Fund, the Margot & Thorvald Dreyer Fund and the Peter og Emma Thomsens Scholarship. Their work experience combines work at David Adjaye Associates and the Swiss Pavilion at the 2008 Venice Architecture Biennale, while their joint graduation thesis explores the transformation of an urban area of Berlin, by the river Spree. 'One of our design work highlights so far was the combined research and diploma work undertaken in Berlin. Apart from that, being given the opportunity to teach and continuously be involved in the academic work at The Department for Cultural Heritage, Transformation and Restoration at The Royal Academy has been a fantastic experience,' they say.

Most inspired by: 'Ideally we would like to continue our current path of combining research and practice and creating architecture while studying and writing about cities in the spirit of Steen Eiler Rasmussen.'

www.va-architects.dk

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Victor Boye Julebäk and Ask Anker Aistrup

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Denmark

Architecture

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Victor Boye Julebäk and Ask Anker Aistrup

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Denmark

Architecture

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Wataru Ideguchi

Keio University, Japan

Architecture

Now working at SANAA, Wataru Ideguchi studied at Tokyo's Keio University. Very much concerned with working on the domestic scale, Ideguchi's studies imprinted the idea that, in his own words, 'slight errors and futility occasionally make spaces more beautiful and rich.' Perhaps unsurprisingly, the graduate's portfolio is awash with sensitive schemes for minimal living, such as the troglodytic 'House including the Hill' and a winding, ribbon-like proposal dubbed 'The apartment which rolls up environment.' SANAA's Kazuyo Sejima (a professor at Keio) and Ryue Nishizawa were clearly major influences, especially on works like the 'Music hall in the forest,' which shares their delicate touch, diaphanous structure and concern with ambiguous boundaries and internal diversity. 'I think the present age is too convenient,' says Ideguchi, and his little domestic vignettes show a fascination with a more vital form of lifestyle.

Most inspired by: 'SANAA'

wataru_ideguchi@yahoo.co.jp

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Wendy Boon Ting Teo

Bartlett School of Architecture, UK

Architecture

Originally from Malaysia, Wendy Boon Ting Teo completed her first degree at the Feng Chia University in Taiwan before moving to London. She graduated from the Bartlett with a master's degree in Architecture in 2011. Tutored by Marcos Cruz and Marjan Colletti, Teo completed her studies at UCL with the Taipei Main Station project, a work that won her the Dean's List for Distinction. Teo has been the recipient of several awards and scholarships – both the Asia and Europe – such as the highly respected Archiprix competition award, and her achievements include an installation in New Orleans AIA, USA. Still living in the UK, she co-founded Atelier LinWen in early 2011, with Linda Hagberg, aiming to combine practice with experimental research into material texture and environmental context in architecture. They won the EVOLO Tower competition with their first project, the Hydro Thermal Organ. 'I am influenced by my parents, Shanshui Drawing, the Chinese garden, Marcos and Marjan, Linda Hagberg, the Bartlett', she says. 'One of the things that inspired me to go into architecture was my father's house building process; building for one's loved ones.'

Would most like to work with: Louis I Khan.'

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Wendy Boon Ting Teo

Bartlett School of Architecture, UK

Architecture

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Youri Kravtchenko and Guillaume Clivaz

EPFL, Switzerland

Architecture

Guillaume Clivaz and Youri Kravtchenko both studied at EPFL and graduated in June 2011. Currently working at Geneva's Clivas Architects (Guillaume's father's firm), they are also in the process of setting up their own practice. At EPFL they fed off the collaborative spirit and hope to translate this into their own work - they are currently preparing designs for interiors, a small apartment building, a winery and an exhibition. Their graduation project spliced the work of Edward Hopper with CAD and model-making, 'helping us cross the gap from theory, art aspects and analyses to a constructive reality, trying to find a way of inserting high‐rise buildings in a historical urban pattern.' As well as each other's approach, they also cite Zurich's Thomas Staufer and Ingrid Hasler as influences, both of whom contribute to EPFL's LABEX research studios. Above all, they want to 'understand that architecture has wrinkles and imperfections and that we should compose with them instead of clear them. Architecture should be sensitive.'

youri.kravtchenko@epfl.ch

guillaume.clivaz@epfl.ch

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Alexandra Gerber

ECAL, Switzerland

Design

For 'Buckets', Alexandra Gerber chose the humble pail as her starting point precisely because of its mundanity. 'The bucket is so restrictive,' she explains. 'It's very simple in terms of its function and its semantics and it has very few physical elements, therefore it was quite a challenge to give it a new character. How far could I change it without destroying the quality that makes it beautiful in its simplicity?' Gerber, who now works at Studio Nitzan Cohen in Munich, addressed this conundrum experimentally: 'I prefer an instinctive approach,' she says.

Most inspired by: 'The cities I live in, the people I live with, the music they listen to, the clothes they wear, their attitudes - all these things inspire me.'

Alexandra.gerber@gmail.com

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Ane Domaas and Linda Falang

Akershus University College, Norway

Design

Ane Domaas and Linda Falang worked together on the 'Vi' lamp series, which developed out of a study of a crow's foot - the bird's balance, weight and movement providing the inspiration for the development of the lamps' shapes. 'Together the lamps functions as a family. The colours of the series are inspired by a typical Norwegian summer.'

Most inspired by: 'Louise Campbell, Tomás Alonso, Ditte Fischer, Romain Duclos.'

www.anekristine.com / www.lindafalangdesign.com

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Anna Glansen

Beckmans College of Design, Sweden

Design

As a product designer working primarily in packaging, Anna Glansen is constantly on the lookout for new materials. For her graduation project, entitled 'This too shall pass', she designed a series of biodegradable food containers - made of substances like beeswax, caramelised sugar and seaweed - where the packaging has the same short life span as the foods they contain. 'My main goal,' she says, 'was to show how we can think differently about packaging and the materials we use.' To open the beeswax basmati rice container, you peel it like a piece of fruit, while to pour from the sugar-coated olive oil vessel, you crack it like an egg.

Most inspired by: 'I am inspired by biomimicry. A designer I admire is Kenya Hara.'

anna_glansen@hotmail.com

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Atsumu Izumi

Tama Art University, Tokyo

Design

Izumi focusts on 'fragile shapes, weak lines and small surface cracks' in his work. 'I feel the phase right before crumbling is very beautiful. I tried to find out what attributes create "internal toughness" and what gives an object overall characteristics of "weakness".' His porcelain bowls were made using hollow ceramic casting.

Most inspired by: 'Japan's earthquakes.'

www.skeleton-mount.com

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Atsumu Izumi

Tama Art University, Tokyo

Design

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Caroline Olsson

Akershus University College, Norway

Design

'Skog', from the Norwegian word for forest, is a series of glass lights in shapes that represent a pine, a small juniper bush and a spruce. It was made in collaboration with a glassworks near where Olsson grew up. 'The design of Skog is inspired by the large forests surrounding Magnor Glassverk. I wanted to recreate the fairy-like experience I had of the forest when I was a little girl.' Designed originally for a thesis show, Skog has now gone into production with Magnor Glassverk.

Most inspired by: 'Nature.'

www.carolineolsson.no

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Caroline Olsson

Akershus University College, Norway

Design

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Caroline Olsson

Akershus University College, Norway

Design

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Catherine Aitken

Royal College of Art, UK

Design

'Bundle' is a collection of seating inspired by actions of organisation - stacking, rolling, laying and bundling. This collection plays with repetition of form to create structure. Tactile materials and playful design details combine to produce forms that retain an openness and fluidity. 'I have a background in textile design and am interested in the idea that pattern and the repetition of simple forms can lead to the development of a three-dimensional product. With Bundle I was interested in creating a joining system that utilised a hard and soft element; I wanted the two elements to be equally dependent on each other. The function - "something to sit on" - came a little later. I always begin in quite an abstract way, but I find this usually leads to a more interesting and unexpected outcome.'

Most inspired by: 'I find Suppose Design Office (Japan) really inspiring. I particularly like the way their buildings subtly promote a closer connection between indoor and outside. I also enjoy the work of Inga Sempé and the Bouroullec brothers.'

www.catherinelouiseaitken.co.uk

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Catherine Aitken

Royal College of Art, UK

Design

[1311599541001]

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Chris Vulpus

Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe

Design

To explain his ‘Restrealität' mirrored box, Vulpus submitted an excerpt from Michel Foucault's 1967 lecture ‘Of Other Space', in which the philosopher describes the mirror as a utopia, or ‘a placeless place'. Currently working on private projects in Berlin, Vulpus says: ‘My last projects are conceptual, playing with viewer's perception.'

Most inspired by: ‘Human beings and life itself.'

www.chrisvulpus.de

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Chris Vulpus

Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe

Design

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Chris Vulpus

Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe

Design

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Clinton Stewart

The Danish Design School, Copenhagen

Design

Clinton Stewart's 'Holey-Poley' modular daybed 'embraces naïve simplicity and conceptual functionality'. Shown at the 2011 Stockholm furniture fair, it is the Australian's attempt at marrying the forms of a child's hammer and peg set and a Chesterfield sofa. 'My design intention is to conceive and realise objects that negate trend and style by imposing and nurturing elements of familiarity that enable people to effortlessly create an associated and exposed understanding of how form and function can become reason.'

Most inspired by: 'A quote by Picasso: "Bad artists copy. Good artists steal".'

www.madeinschool.dk/clinton-stewart

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Clinton Stewart

The Danish Design School, Copenhagen

Design

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Fanny Dora

ECAL, Switzerland

Design

The 'Daedaleas' miniature shelving systems, which were part of ECAL's 2011 graduation show, are delicate folded forms that creep across your walls. 'It almost like a fungus or a parasite,' says Fanny Dora. 'They grow by conquering the natural space and grabbing the domestic environment. My design process always starts with a reference or something that inspires me; a technique, a material or a colour. Experimentation is really important to me. I like to play with unexpected material associations, such as having wood and mirrored surfaces meeting to influence your perception of each object.'

Most inspired by: 'Nature, science, sculpture, photography.'

www.fannydora.com

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Fanny Dora

ECAL, Switzerland

Design

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Frans Felix Ahlberg Eriksson

Konstfack University, Sweden

Design

With his delicate red wire case, Eriksson sets out to question, rather than answer, our preconceptions about designed objects: ‘What defines the cabinet as a cabinet? Do we need a definition? How would our built realm look without it?'

Most inspired by: ‘Geometry, philosophy.'

www.fransfelix.se

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Giorgia Zanellato

ECAL, Switzerland

Design

For the final project of her Masters degree, Giorgia Zanellato presented Narciso ('Narcissus') a collection of six vases - made from borosilicate glass, powder-coated aluminium and mirrored stainless steel - which use mirrors to highlight the characteristics of the flowers being displayed. 'The flowers are investigated in all their aspects,' says Zanellato, who lives in Treviso and works at Fabrica, the Benetton Group Communication Research Center. 'In this way each vase shows flowers from a different point of view.'

Most inspired by: 'Over the past year I have been interested in "useless" aesthetic objects, which is why I did my thesis on "Soprammobili", which means "ornaments" or "knick-knacks" in Italian.'

www.giorgiazanellato.altervista.org

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Gustav Carlberg

Beckmans College of Design, Sweden

Design

The 'Reflektioner' lamp is Gustav Carlberg's attempt to show that furniture needn't have fixed and static roles. By putting a second light source in the base of a classic goose-necked lamp, he opened up a range of possible shapes and combinations. 'It is no longer bound to be just a floor lamp. It can be an ordinary floor lamp or a ceiling lamp or a combination of both if you connect two of them.'

Most inspired by: 'The Swedish artist Meta Isæus-Berlin and Freud's concept of Das Unheimliche.'

www.gustavcarlberg.se

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Hannes Lennartsson

Beckmans College of Design, Stockholm

Design

Hailing from Gothenburg but currently on a one-year voyage of discovery in Vancouver, Canada, product and interior designer Hennes Lennartsson's 'Open Habitat' is an attempt to create a new and more versatile form of furniture. 'With a table, a chair and a lamp as a starting point, I tried to create a sculptural piece of furniture that could easily be altered to suit our ever-changing habits and needs - and in doing so, hopefully extend the product's longevity.'

Most inspired by: 'People and their habits. Being surrounded by nature. My family and my friends.'

www.hannes-lennartsson.blogspot.com

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Hyerin Jung

School of Art and Design, Aalto University, Helsinki

Design

Hyerin Jung studied ceramic art and product design in Seoul before moving to Helsinki, where she finds the locals are open to new ideas and value the subtle beauty of ordinary domestic objects. 'The idea for "TeaNest" originated from the simple observation of casual tea-drinking habits,' she says. 'While a tea infuser is frequently used with tea leaves, people don't always know where to put it when finished with it. TeaNest's round handle provides an alternative space for the infuser or for serving honey or cream.'

Most inspired by: 'The timelessly beautiful and functional tableware of Kaj Franck.'

www.slowfactory.fi

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Ian Yu

Pratt Institute, US

Design

'Gleich', Ian Yu's servingware project, was inspired by the designer's investigation of the relationship between food and identity. 'Every person has his/her personality, so does food. With this idea in mind, I created a set of three objects with their distinct "bellies" underneath the surface. These bellies can be flipped upside down to use as plates. Therefore, the types of food served will dictate the landscape of the dining table.' He adds: 'I am always interested in finding stories behind objects. They tell the story through forms, materials, and functions. I would describe my design process as combining the three elements to create a coherent narrative.'

Most inspired by: 'Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Bouroullec brothers, and Olafur Eliasson.'

www.ianyudesign.com

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Ian Yu

Pratt Institute, US

Design

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James Uren

Buckinghamshire New University, UK

Design

James Uren's 'Luso' lounger is a chic reinterpretation of the classic chaise longue. Like his stools, it has a clean minimalist aesthetic. 'It evolved from looking at redundant furniture and re-inventing it to suit the way in which we live today,' he says. 'The addition of a footstool means that there are a number of different ways in which it can be used; a day bed, lounger or chair.' The interesting asymmetric form is versatile and makes an appealing place to lounge. The frame is American cherry and the shell of the lounger is made from lacquered plywood.

Most inspired by: 'My final year tutor at Bucks, Carl Clerkin, has been my most recent inspiration.'

www.jamesurendesign.co.uk

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Jérémy Corbière

ESBA Tour Angers Le Mans, France

Design

Some of Jérémy Corbière's designs transform chicken coops into furniture, using the birds as decoration, or see umbrellas sprout grass seeds. In his 'Cristaline' project he takes throw-away plastic bottles and adds patterns and perforations. 'This ornamental perforation is as an act of rescue, allowing a banal object - a disposable bottle - to be reconsidered. When the ornament destroys the strict function of the bottle, it gives it a new quality, the new bottle looks like a precious object. It becomes a visual curiosity, a vase or a sculptural object.'

Most inspired by: 'Chris Kabel, Maarten Baas, Julien Berthier and Nacho Carbonell.'

www.jeremycorbiere.com

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Kaia Lisveen

Akershus University College, Norway

Design

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Kaia Lisveen

Akershus University College, Norway

Design

Many of Kaia Lisveen's designs feature curved and formed laminated wood, a contemporary nod to the predominant natural material of her native Norway. 'Peekaboo' is her curvaceous, dynamic take on the chest of drawers, where the opening movement of the drawers is accomplished by pushing them sideways. 'It's a piece of furniture that can hide your mess,' she says. 'I wanted it to change the chest of drawers concept by breaking with the traditional shape. The drawers are laminated with bamboo and the walls are painted white so that the drawers are clearly presented.' It was exhibited at Design and Architecture Center in Oslo, in June 2011.

Most inspired by: 'My grandfather, a carpenter who makes furniture with materials from his own forest and who let me play in his workshop.'

www.lisveen.com

[1311599539001]

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Kaschkasch

Academy of Design & Crafts Münster, Germany

Design

Sebastian Schneider and Florian Kallus, who operate together under the name Kaschkasch, are interested in minimalist and straightforward designs, where the forms are reduced to an almost graphic appearance. 'The products seem simple at first sight, but are not when you look at the detail. We spend a lot of time developing this through trial and error,' they say. 'Pinokkio' is a table/bench set inspired by 1950s and 60s Scandinavian furniture. It is made from oak and ash with soap treated and stained surfaces and legs fixed on through anodized joints.

Most inspired by: 'People, fashion, building sites, everything visual that surrounds us.'

www.kaschkasch.com

[1313699218001]

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Kaschkasch

Academy of Design & Crafts Münster, Germany

Design

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Lotte de Raadt

Design Academy Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Design

'The idea of the project "Ode to Tap Water" is to make the image of tap water more attractive,' says Lotte de Raadt, who also wants to show how Dutch tap water comes from different sources, with distinct tastes. 'Each carafe resembles a tap and is shaped according to where the water is sourced from - the longest necked bottle is for water that comes from deep underground, the stout bottle is for collecting surface water and the last one is for collecting dune water. The stopper reveals where the water eventually comes from - a tap. In the end all I want is to encourage people to drink more tap water. It is something I really believe in.'

Most inspired by: 'Human behaviour, especially the divide between nature versus culture.'

www.lottederaadt.nl

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Luke Smoothy

Kingston University, UK

Design

Londoner Luke Smoothy believes that limiting technology, slowing it down, can have its advantages. 'Whole music libraries can be shared in seconds now, so there's no longer the same consideration given to each and every song,' he says. 'The joy of crafting and spending time recording a mixtape is gone.' Smoothy designed 'Digital Mixtape' as a means of re-establishing the missing emotional connection when sharing digital music: 'Fifteen carefully chosen songs are far more valuable than a memory stick of thousands.'

Most inspired by: 'I am influenced only by particular research for each and every project. I believe with everything you need a balance of ignorance and appreciation.'

www.luke-smoothy.co.uk

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Luke Smoothy

Kingston University, UK

Design

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Martin Johnson

Akershus University College, Norway

Design

Six years experience in the construction business was key to developing Johnson's extensive knowledge of materials and techniques. Of his ‘Klean' floor lamp, he says: ‘I've attempted to create a lamp with personality, which also captures the essence of clean, no-frills aesthetics.' Born in the UK and raised in Spain, the Norwegian-based designer feels this has influenced his approach to design. ‘My dream is to one day design something that really makes a difference,' he says.

Most inspired by: 'In this case, a wonky street light.'

www.martin-j.com

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Mathilde de Malleray

École Camondo, France

Design

De Malleray's ‘Vers d'Autres Horizons' seat, designed for public parks, come with various heights to allow for other uses – such as stretching before a run.

Most inspired by: 'The poetic shapes and colours of the designer Matali Crasset.'


www.mathildedemalleray.com

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Mathilde de Malleray

École Camondo, France

Design

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Mathilde de Malleray

École Camondo, France

Design

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Max Frommeld

Royal College of Art, UK

Design

Growing up in an industrial part of Germany and working in local factories has given Max Frommeld an interest in the aesthetic qualities of manufacturing. 'I am a designer who is very interested in industrial production,paired with creative problem solving. Most of my work is driven by the exploration of simple manufacturing techniques in order to conceive functional objects which are designed to be used in real life scenarios.' His hose clip shelving unit explores modularity. 'My intention was to create a shelving system that is versatile, extendable but also adjustable. Also, I loved the fact that I could integrate a standard, off the shelf component, a hose clip, into the product.'

Most inspired by: 'Richard Sapper, Hans Gugelot, Jean Prouvé, Friso Kramer and Otl Aicher.'

www.ma-fro.com

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Max Frommeld

Royal College of Art, UK

Design

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Neelima Narayanan

Parson The New School for Design, US

Design

Neelima Narayanan, originally from India, grew up in Singapore. Her project, 'Inate' is a set of tableware designed for people who suffer from dementia. 'After my grandmother was diagnosed with dementia I felt it was important to design for an ageing population,' she says. 'Not just by helping, but also creating an aesthetic set of cutlery.' Her products promote independence for the user and at the same time give a sense of ease for carers. 'Mealtimes are often stressful and carers can spend up to six hours a day on them. There are spoons to help induce swallowing of puree for those who suffer from Dysphagia and there is an ergonomic plate, for ease of holding, scooping and feeding, as well as an anti-slip place mat.'

Most inspired by: 'Bouroullec brothers, Alvar Aalto, Robert Mangold'.

www.neelima-design.com

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Pekka Kuivamäki

Aalto University, Finland

Design

Pekka Kuivamäki is interested in giving his objects a multiplicity of functions: 'Empty space can be used for anything, an empty cup doesn't define it's contents. I believe that multifunction is the key feature in new design.' The multifunctionality in the 'Maja' series appears in two forms. Firstly, for the user: the cups aren't made for any specific purpose; you can drink coffee or water or you can keep your precious things under the lid. Secondly, for the maker: when making Maja cups, the lid-piece can be attached to the bottom of a cup, thus making it a foot-piece for the cup.

Most inspired by: 'Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, Donald Judd and Kaj Franck'.

www.pekkakuivamaki.com

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Pekka Kuivamäki

Aalto University, Finland

Design

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Peter Boeckel

University Of Applied Science, Germany

Design

Peter Boeckel's 'Phalanx' is part industrial design, part sculpture. The German graduate has merged a table and four chairs to create a single object. To stow the chairs, you simply push them into place under the table. Boeckel, who comes from Frankfurt am Main but now lives in Hong Kong, says of his approach: 'I try to scrutinise and interpret objects and processes in abstract and unusual ways. I think it's important to find the right dose of friction between product and user.' Phalanx's table and chairs are made from powder-coated wire with PU-Foam seat cushions and a fibre concrete plate table top.

Most inspired by: 'Observing my surroundings, manufacturing processes, materials, literature and music.'

www.peterboeckel.com

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Peter Schäfer

Karlsruhe University, Germany

Design

Schäfer's ‘Curtain Coaster', made in collaboration with theatre equipment company Gerriets, is a flexible room divider concept. ‘My work focuses on the object and its environment,‘ says Schäfer, who is now working in Paris with Bless.

Most inspired by: ‘Volker Albus, Bless,'

www.peterschaefer.net

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Roland Beaven

Camberwell College of Art, UK

Design

Roland Beaven has spent his life taking machines apart and his work is driven by the desire to show the aesthetic qualities of an object's function. 'The "Peaucellier" lamp was born out of a year-long project exploring the beauty and tangibility of mechanical objects. The lamp is based on and named after the Peaucellier straight-line linkage. Invented in 1864, it was the first linkage to turn circular motion into linear motion. The Peaucellier lamp draws on the aesthetic of mechanical objects while employing the functionality that is commonly associated with them.'

Most inspired by: 'The kinetic sculptor Arthur Ganson.'

www.rolandbeaven.co.uk

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Roland Beaven

Camberwell College of Art, UK

Design

[1313699220001]

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Saori Ichikawa

Konstfack University, Sweden

Design

Now working at the Fibre Art Studio in Tokyo, Saori Ichikawa studied textiles for her MA at Konstfack. For her 'Patina' project she wanted to create a textile inspired by aged materials. 'Objects start to have a new flavour and charm over time. The Latin term "patina" means antique, nostalgia, reminiscence. It also signifies the colour or encrustation that age gives to objects and the changes in appearance produced by long-standing behaviour, practice or use. Patina has irregular shapes, mixtures of materials and combining structures to represent the impression of aged carpets.'

Most inspired by: 'Gunilla largerhem Ullberg, Cilla Ramnek, Hella Jongerius'

www.saoriichikawa.blogspot.com

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Tobias Pieper

Academy of Design & Crafts Münster, Germany

Design

Tobias Pieper completed a cabinet-making apprenticeship in his hometown of Dortmund before moving to Munster to study. 'For me, the most interesting things are made by hand with analogue techniques,' he says. 'The result should reveal the story of its creation, so I like my designs to be authentic in combining the right materials and well-thought out constructions, so that the patina can continue the story on the surface.' His 'Indigo' writing table was constructed with a light, technical appearance thanks to the trestle legs of powder-coated, milled aluminium. They can be mounted in two positions to set the table to different heights.

Most inspired by: 'Enzo Mari.'

www.tobikolor.com

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Tobias Pieper

Academy of Design & Crafts Münster, Germany

Design

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Victoria Günzler

Oslo National Academy of Arts, Norway

Design

This plant table is designed to bring gardening up to a manageable height and provide for the different functions and needs of potting and plant care. 'I use nature as a basis in my designs, its formal language and its unique abilities,' says Günzler. 'I wish to be honest in my work and for this to be reflected in my choice of techniques and materials. Craft techniques inspire me, and their continuation is something I wish to participate in. I want my products to give people the opportunity to have an active relationship with the objects that surround them.'

Most inspired by: 'The late Swedish/Austrian architect Joseph Frank and his elaborate textile designs capture everything that is beautiful and amazing about nature.'

www.victoriagunzler.no

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Victoria Günzler

Oslo National Academy of Arts, Norway

Design

[1313699216001]

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Yookyung Shin

Royal College of Art, UK

Design

After two years of MA study at the RCA, Yoo-kyung Shin is now working on a manufacturing project to bring her own designs to market, sponsored by the Korean Institute of Design Promotion. Her innovative approach involves transforming two-dimensional drawings into three-dimensional objects. 'With the process I have developed, it is possible to manipulate surfaces to form substantial three-dimensional volumes without the need for a mould, while retaining the delicate simplicity of a two dimensional illustration.' Metallic ink is printed onto a sheet to act as a key, the sheet is then folded into its final three-dimensional form. Metal is then 'grown' on the object's surface, creating a ridged structure through the process of 'electoforming'. The sheet material can then be removed, leaving the finished self-supporting form.

Most inspired by: 'Tord Boontje.'

www.yoo-kyung.com

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Aus Dem

Università Iuav di Venezia, Italy

Fashion

Created by Gianmarco Giacometti and Sara de Poli, Aus Dem is all about the fashion explorer. The duo's graduate collection was certainly intrepid: using multiple leather and fur jackets, they created outfits, complete with enveloping hoods, fit for the spacemen that inspired them. Even the more wearable pieces have an ‘urban adventurer' feel – leather jackets come with sharp, asymmetric zips, and bags have a lived-in look.

Most inspired by: ‘Urban spaces and the patterns in cement, asphalt or buildings.'

www.notjustalabel.com/aus_dem

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Aus Dem

Università Iuav di Venezia, Italy

Fashion

[1334918143001]

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Brian Suter-Maury

Parsons College of Art & Design, US

Fashion

Originally from Switzerland, Suter-Maury creates pieces that whisper luxurious simplicity and mix in the urban elegance of his adopted home city, New York. The forms of his graduate collection were based on abstract, architectural line drawings, but remained chic as well as conceptual. it's no surprise that, on graduating, Suter-Maury was snapped up by that ultimate urban minimalist, Narciso Rodriguez. He is currently completing an internship with the NYC designer.

Most inspired by: '1990s fashion – especially Gianni Versace's more minimalist yet seductive work.'

www.notjustalabel.com/brian_suter_maury

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Daniel Hurlin

Institut Français de la Mode, France

Fashion

He's only 24, but Hurlin has squeezed an impressive amount into his life so far. Originally from the Pyrenees, he almost completed a Central Saint Martins BA before dropping out. Jobs designing for Tesco and Raf Simons, and labouring on an organic farm in Japan, followed. He then completed an MA at the Institut Français de la Mode, graduating with a vivid, manga-influenced collection, including this jacket produced by Grain de Couleur and Grandis Couture.

Most inspired by: ‘People with a bold personality and something to say.'

www.notjustalabel.com/daniel_hurlin

[1311599548001]

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Daniel Hurlin

Institut Français de la Mode, France

Fashion

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Dinu Bodiciu

London College of Fashion, UK

Fashion

Bodiciu has worked as a theatre costume designer and bookbinder. But fashion is the Romanian designer's true calling, as demonstrated by a graduate collection featuring textured fabrics, sharp cuts and graphic headpieces. Since graduating, his designs have been worn by Lady Gaga and he has collaborated with Givenchy.

Most inspired by: ‘The human body, and its unspoken language and posture.'

www.notjustalabel.com/dinu_bodiciu

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Hannah Taylor

Royal College of Art, UK

Fashion

To say Taylor is a knitting enthusiast is something of an understatement. Hailing from the north of England, she completed a menswear MA at the RCA last year, with her graduate collection a serious woolfest, from super-sized jumpers to knitted tiger masks and even an Aran jumpsuit. Scoring her a Knitted Textile Award, it also caught the attention of Burberry. Taylor is now working with the British brand's men's knitwear team.

Most inspired by: ‘Coming up with new slants on traditional pieces of knitwear.'

www.notjustalabel.com/hannahtaylor

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Julie Eilenberger

Berlin University of Arts, Germany

Fashion

As well as training in fashion, Eilenburger has studied art and design too – in fact, she was originally torn between the two disciplines. Fashion won, but an artistic sensibility remains. Her graduate collection, entitled ‘Naked As We Came', came complete with a cerebral concept: based on the similarities between children and the elderly, it features a sketched zig zag print, textured, chunky knits and appliqué pieces that have a crafty charm.

Most inspired by: 'I am a big fan of Italian brands, Marni being my favourite. Every collection is so understated yet refreshingly new and humorous.'

www.notjustalabel.com/julie_eilenberger

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Matthias Weber

Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Belgium

Fashion

Mixing tribal Tibetan influences with his Bavarian upbringing, Weber's vision has a clever wit about it. Christened ‘Tibetan Bratwurst' by its creator, who has worked as a freelance stylist, the juxtaposition has produced a fresh, modern collection complete with vibrant prints, lederhosen detailing and tracksuit pants.

Most inspired by: ‘The idea of a boy who never left his home town and whose only chance to travel is in his dreams.'

www.notjustalabel.com/matthiasweber

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Myrza de Muynck

Central Saint Martins, UK

Fashion

Dutch designer De Muynck took a fashion slight as the jumping off point for her graduate collection. Naming it ‘poverty de luxe' in honour of designer Paul Poiret‘s assessment of Coco Chanel's creations, she designed her collection working with the combination of the everyday and the luxurious. That means tracksuits given a designer edge with embroidery, hand-painted print and, in a witty nod, Chanel-style quilting.

Most inspired by: ‘Casual chic sportswear couture; cool, tomboyish girls who look like ladies. I would like to see model Freja Beha Erichsen in my clothes.'

www.notjustalabel.com/myrzademuynck

[1311599547001]

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Myrza de Muynck

Central Saint Martins, UK

Fashion

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Niels Peeraer

Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Belgium

Fashion

Belgian-born Peeraer might only be months out of college, but he is already a much garlanded designer. With the highest grade in his year, the menswear talent collected five awards and a collaboration with leather goods company, Delvaux on graduating. His collection shows you why – based on a boy who loves video games, Asian models wore complicated harness and head pieces, along with tutus and tweed. The result? A curious mix of sweet and sharp.

Most inspired by: 'Cupcakes and donuts for the colours, modern Japan for the unlimited cuteness.'

www.notjustalabel.com/nielspeeraer

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Nouio Tri

Shih Chien University, Taiwan

Fashion

The full magnitude of Nouio Tri's collection can only be viewed in 3D. 'The naked eye cannot take the initiative to see the human three-dimensional reality,' says Tri. Using nature as his subject, the Taiwanese designer uses a computer to produce 3D images of flowers onto fabric to create his designs. So dig out your 3D glasses to see what it all about.

Most inspired by: 'Music.'

www.notjustalabel.com/nouio

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Saskia Schijen

Royal College of Art, UK

Fashion

Anyone confessing to a Cos addiction may want to check out Schijen's work, as the German RCA graduate worked as a freelance designer for the high-street minimalism mecca before commencing her studies. Her graduate collection, while with a younger spirit – it includes cropped pieces and low-slung jeans – demonstrates a developed feeling for clothes that work in real life, as well as a well-honed eye for detail. Shirts, shorts and wide-legged slacks become stars.

Most inspired by: 'My friends and their wardrobes; real girls, music and creating something very personal and authentic.'

www.notjustalabel.com/saskiaschijen

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Victoria Spruce

Royal College of Art, UK

Fashion

Spruce could be the next Nicholas Kirkwood. Trained both at Cordwainers College and the RCA, the Kent-born shoe designer loves architectural forms, and creates mind-bending heels (her corkscrew-style silhouettes are something to behold) that also boast commercial clout. An admirer of the way Balenciaga's Nicolas Ghesquière reinvents the house with each season, she harbours, we hope, similar aspirations with her own label.

Most inspired by: ‘Sculptor Merete Rasmussen's organic shapes. On seeing them, I started to melt strips of plastic to create my own designs.'

www.notjustalabel.com/victoriaspruce

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Vivienne Appelius

Berlin University of the Arts, Germany

Fashion

Born-and-raised in Berlin, Appelius spent much of her MA course in Copenhagen, interning with Henrik Vibskov. The influence of the Danish designer can be seen in the digital prints of her graduate collection, although the concept is all her own. while the collection tells the story of a period the designer spent in self-imposed isolation, the pieces – such as printed trench coats and delicate shirt dresses – are, happily, wearable in the wider world.

Most inspired by: ‘Different moods during my self-experiment in isolation.'

www.notjustalabel.com/vivienneappelius

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Anna Molinari

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

'Inside Out', Anna Molinari's graduate collection, is based on the complexity of cell and bone structure. But don't be put off by ghoulish anatomy references - her rings in particular are masterful web-like constructions in gold and precious stones, articulated to split in half or engineered to spin inside each other.

Most inspired by: 'Munnu Kasliwal, head designer at Gem Palace, and the Matsys design studio.'

annamolinari.jewellery@googlemail.com

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Anna Molinari

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Anna Molinari

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Hee Young Kim

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

Hee Young Kim's 'Arrangement and Satisfaction' collection can be traced back to the humble origins of her desk, where she drew inspiration from the movement of the drawers and the tidying and re-arranging of its contents. Many of her pieces slide to create smaller hidden spaces known only to the wearer. Kim successfully raises her collection above it's utilitarian origins with the deft use of gold plating and softly brushed silver.

Most inspired by: 'Rachel Whiteread and Mary Martin.'

www.heeyoungkimjewellery.com

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Hee Young Kim

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Hee Young Kim

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Jing Jing Cao

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

We were initially drawn to Cao's graphic use of black and white in her sculptural collection, successfully fashioned from humble materials such as brass and shell. It's title 'Memento Mori' suggests an obsession with Victoriana, which goes some way to explain the larger statement ruffs and collars. We particularly like her cuffs, rings and bangles with skillfully cut black acrylic and threaded brass wire, which steer well clear of any vintage aesthetic.

Most inspired by: 'Light and Shadow'

michele_caojingjing@hotmail.com

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Jing Jing Cao

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Lauren Colover

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

It's clear to see the influence of an internship at Solange Azagury-Partridge on Colover's work. Unusually for a graduate collection her pieces stand out due to a highly refined 'fine jewellery' aesthetic and the expansive use of colour and micro-pave setting. Basing her collection on the Japanese Ginkgo tree to represent 'endurance and all that is valuable in life', she deftly combines gold with a rainbow mix of precious stones. It's no surprise she was the only graduate this year to win a Bright Young Gem award at International Jewellery London.

Most inspired by: 'All elements that surround me'

www.laurencolover.com

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Lauren Colover

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Lauren Colover

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Lauren Colover

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Sadhbh McCormack

Royal College of Art, UK

Jewellery

McCormack's signature statement necklaces in oversized cuts of acrylic and gold-plated brass are not for the faint-hearted. Having graduated from the National College of Art and Design in Dublin in 2007 she honed her style at the Royal College of Art, skillfully blending hand-crafted techniques with computer aided design in a successful mix of 1980's meets tribal.

Most inspired by: 'Maison Martin Margiela and African tribal art.'

www.sadhbhmccormack.com

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Sadhbh McCormack

Royal College of Art, UK

Jewellery

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Sadhbh McCormack

Royal College of Art, UK

Jewellery

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Xin Ran Lu

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

Xin Ran Lu sites the golden section and fractals as influencing his work, which you can spot in the repetitive motifs in his collection, although we were initially drawn to the architectural quality of his pieces. Cuffs and chokers lined with python leather sit comfortably on the skin, while the dull rhodium facets with polished edges contrast perfectly with the sparkling zircon, making it easy to see how his pieces could be upgraded into diamonds and white gold. Boodles also saw the potential and awarded him their 2011 Boodles Award.

Most inspired by: 'The visual style of Bjork.'

www.xinranlu.com

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Xin Ran Lu

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Xin Ran Lu

Central Saint Martins, UK

Jewellery

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

With titles such as 'snakes', 'coffin' and 'fog', the photographs in Alexandra Emes Lázár's 'Fear' series provoke a visceral reaction. 'Fear is one of the most atavistic and basic human instincts,' she explains. 'Which is why I consider it important to get acquainted with it.' The series was inspired by Sigmund Freud, Frida Kahlo's paintings, Lars von Trier's films, and Hungarian writer Antal Szerb. 'Each image tries to bring up a particular fear visually,' adds Lazar, who now lives and works in London. 'My goal was to provoke an immediate reaction without any explanation.'

Most inspired by: 'Lars von Trier, Nan Goldin, Ryan McGinley, Robert Mapplethorpe, Béla Tarr, Hiroshi Sugimoto.'

www.alexandraemese.com

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Alexandra Emese Lázár

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Benedek Bognar

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

Benedek Bognar's 'Brave New World' project was inspired, he says, by 'the incompatibility of nature and human space'. The photographs were taken at Budapest's Natural History Museum, at Budapest Zoo, and on hunting expeditions in Hungary. 'I was trying point out the distance between the reality and the imaginary nature. Nowadays we often meet nature indirectly, by way of photography, movies and paintings, therefore the representation of nature is often untrue. In museums, elements of the natural sphere are simulated by the different exhibitions, which leads to grotesque and surreal results.'

Most inspired by: 'Jean Baudrillard's 'Simulacra and Simulation', Paul Virilio's 'The Information Bomb', Guy Debord's 'Society of Spectacle'

www.bbenedek.tumblr.com

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Benedek Bognar

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Benedek Bognar

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Benedek Bognar

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Benedek Bognar

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Benedek Bognar

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Benedek Bognar

Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design, Hungary

Photography

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

Baker and Evans' Moronic project explores the flexibility of language by illustrating linguistic paradoxes found on news media search engines. By using various still-life and semi-performative methods, the duo has created a set of perplexing shots, such as this 'Over Full' glass, which like the image itself, is not sufficiently equipped to carry its content. ‘We aim to produce images that are often surreal and a bit curious,' they say.

Most inspired by: 'Aurélien Arbet and Jérémie Egry, Clare Strand, Jason Evans.'

www.farnhamfotoflux.co.uk

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

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Brendan Baker and Daniel Evans

Farnham University, UK

Photography

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David Favrod

ECAL, Switzerland

Photography

David Favord took as his starting point for the project ‘Gaijin' his own multi-national identity, being the son of a Swiss father and a Japanese mother. ‘When I was 18, I asked for dual nationality at the Japanese embassy, but they refused, because it is only given to Japanese women who wish to obtain their husband's nationality. It is from this feeling of rejection and also from a desire to prove that I am as Japanese as I am Swiss, that this work was created. Gaijin is a fictional narrative, a tool for my quest for identity, where self-portraits imply an intimate and solitary relationship that I have with myself. The aim of this work is to create “my own Japan”, in Switzerland, from memories of my journeys when I was small, my mother's stories, popular and traditional culture and my grandparents war narratives.'

Most inspired by: ‘My bicultural education.'

www.davidfavrod.com

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David Favrod

ECAL, Switzerland

Photography

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Hampus Lundgren

Nordens Fotoskola, Sweden

Photography

Having completed his studies, Hampus Lundgren now works as a press photographer, completing reportage projects in his spare time. The first photographs are taken from a story about hunting. 'Lately there have been discussions about the problem of wolves and bears in parts of the Swedish countryside,' he says. 'The locals want to shoot them.' The other photographs were taken on 22 July, minutes after Anders Behring Breivik detonated a car bomb in the middle of the Norwegian capital Oslo. 'As far as I know, the man in the first image survived,' he says.

Most inspired by: 'The Dutch photographer Pieter ten Hoopen, who I've had as a teacher over the past few years, has a lot of great stories that I often return to.'

www.hampuslundgren.com

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Hampus Lundgren

Nordens Fotoskola, Sweden

Photography

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Hampus Lundgren

Nordens Fotoskola, Sweden

Photography

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Hampus Lundgren

Nordens Fotoskola, Sweden

Photography

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Hampus Lundgren

Nordens Fotoskola, Sweden

Photography

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Ahn Jun

Parsons The New School for Design, USA

Photography

Jun's self-portraits are an attempt to explore how context, or lack of it, can alter the meaning of a photographic project. Recreating a teenage suicide fantasy, she uses auto shutter to take multiple shots of herself moving to the edge of a tall building. When pictured in sequence, the images show her fear. One image taken alone, however, gives an illusion of peace and tranquillity. ‘I explore fear, pleasure and tension within that situation,' explains Jun. ‘I choose landmark structures or places that have a personal significance, such as my apartment building, and move to the edge until the memory card is full.'

Most inspired by: ‘The stroboscopic flash photography of Harold Edgerton.'

www.ahnjun.com

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Mandy Barker

De Montfort University, UK

Photography

Barker's work aims to engage the viewer by combining a contradiction between initial aesthetic attraction and the subsequent awareness of an image's message. This image is part of a series entitled Soup, after the name given to plastic debris in the sea. The plastics photographed have been salvaged from beaches around the world. This example represents plastics suspended in the sea that animals and marine creatures have attempted to ingest.

Most inspired by: ‘Japanese post-war photographer Shomei Tomatsu.'

www.mandy-barker.com

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Mandy Barker

De Montfort University, UK

Photography

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Mandy Barker

De Montfort University, UK

Photography

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Mandy Barker

De Montfort University, UK

Photography

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Mandy Barker

De Montfort University, UK

Photography

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Martin Seeds

The University of Brighton, UK

Photography

'I think I was trying come to terms with my troubled heritage,' says Martin Seeds of his body of work. The images in his project, 'I have troubles[...]', which he describes as 'a search for a lost cultural identity and an investigation into origins', were all taken in Northern Ireland between December 2010 and June 2011. Seeds grew up in Belfast but left the city in 1986 to move to London and pursue a career in IT. This series investigates the increasing sense of alienation and detachment he feels when he now returns to his country of birth.

Most inspired by: 'Robbert Flick, James Joyce, E.E. Cummings, Paul Graham, Jochem Lempert, Mario Giacomelli, Anders Petersen, Collier Schorr'

www.martinseeds.com

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Martin Seeds

The University of Brighton, UK

Photography

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Martin Seeds

The University of Brighton, UK

Photography

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Martin Seeds

The University of Brighton, UK

Photography

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Martin Seeds

The University of Brighton, UK

Photography

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Namsa Leuba

ECAL, Switzerland

Photography

Namsa Leuba travelled to her mother's homeland of Guinea Conakry for ‘Ya Kala Ben', a photography graduation project that involved the depiction of the body in African ritual and the use of sacred sculptures in ceremonial practices. ‘I have studied ritual artifacts common to the cosmology of Guineans; statuettes that are part of a ceremonial structure. They are from another world, they are the roots of the living. Thereby, I sought to touch the untouchable. Throughout my fieldwork, I had to deal with the sometimes violent reactions from Guineans who viewed my practices as a form of sacrilege. Some were afraid and were struck with astonishment.' Ya Kala Ben won two of ECAL's photography prizes in 2011.

Most inspired by: ‘The photographers Viviane Sassen, Peter Hugo, Samuel Fosso and the artists Stephan Burger, Yinka Shonibare and Olaf Breuning.'

www.namsaleuba.com

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Namsa Leuba

ECAL, Switzerland

Photography

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Namsa Leuba

ECAL, Switzerland

Photography

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Nick Shepard

School of Visual Arts, USA

Photography

This image, called ‘After Balthasar van der Ast (Bouquet with Shells and Creatures)', is part of a project called ‘De bekende wereld' (Dutch for ‘The Known World'), a title chosen to describe images that are anchored in both contemporary society and in a larger historical continuum. ‘This particular piece picks up Norman Bryson's idea that the flowers in Dutch flower paintings were sourced from across Europe and bloomed in different seasons. By bringing together flowers from different seasons and places, these paintings collapse time and space. For my picture I brought together and photographed a bouquet combining flowers that naturally bloom at different times and in different places. The creatures were sourced from internet images, and then inserted digitally into the picture. Globalisation allowed us to collapse time and space via a bouquet; digitalisation allows us to do it on our home computers.'

Most inspired by: ‘Norman Bryson's ‘Looking at the Overlooked'; Rembrandt, Vermeer, Kalf, Courbet; Hiroshi Sugimoto, Jeff Wall and Christopher Williams.'

www.nickshepard.com

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Nick Shepard

School of Visual Arts, USA

Photography

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Nick Shepard

School of Visual Arts, USA

Photography

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Nick Shepard

School of Visual Arts, USA

Photography

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Nick Shepard

School of Visual Arts, USA

Photography

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Nick Shepard

School of Visual Arts, USA

Photography

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Adam Phillips

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

Adam Phillips says he designs for people: 'We are always designing for users, though this is often forgotten amidst frenzied styling.' His final project at the RCA spliced the domestic realm with the highway to create the 'Family Dynamic', a car with an interior focus drawn from the space and flexibility of the contemporary home. 'A successful family vehicle needs to be more than just a clever seating arrangement. It should grow and adapt with its occupants from one stage of their lives to the next,' says Phillips. He's pragmatic about the role of design. 'The need for brands to differentiate through design is paramount but the way we see the automobile is changing rapidly and is no longer the symbol of freedom and power it once was.'

Most inspired by: 'Ultra-functional mass-market cars like the original Fiat Twingo, Smart and Fiat Multipla.'

adam.phillips@network.rca.ac.uk

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Adam Phillips

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Adam Phillips

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Amadou Ndiaye

Strate Collège, France

Transport

Senegalese designer Amadou Ba Ndiaye did an exchange programme at France's Strate College and has now graduated from the Université de Montréal. Sponsored work includes a stint at Peugeot, but he also has a passion for sleek sports machines. 'The car is an extremely complex product that is not used simply to move from A to B,' he says. 'It also includes social aspects and sustainable development, and design can help solve these problems.' His design studies include the 'Bugatti Altess', a 'vehicle with a dual personality' for the well-heeled sports enthusiast. The Altess is a mix of classic GT and lean sports car; a detachable piece of bodywork effects the transformation. His 'BMWi1' is a thoughtful extrapolation of the company's forthcoming 'i' range, a tilting single-seater designed to convey pure driving thrills with lightweight construction and electric power. CO-V is a car-sharing concept for the 'Y Generation', an admission that car ownership is on the wane amongst the young and manufacturers need new strategies for the 'flexible, spontaneous and immediate' demands of the future. The VW-branded machine envisages widespread use of autonomous driving, so that the interior can be re-configured as a mobile office or lounge.

Most inspired by: 'The design clarity of German cars; VW's Walter de'Silva.'

www.coroflot.com/amadeus

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Amadou Ndiaye

Strate Collège, France

Transport

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Amadou Ndiaye

Strate Collège, France

Transport

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Amadou Ndiaye

Strate Collège, France

Transport

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Amadou Ndiaye

Strate Collège, France

Transport

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Amadou Ndiaye

Strate Collège, France

Transport

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Christopher Lai

Pforzheim University, Germany

Transport

Chris Lai's portfolio from his time at the School of Design at Pforzheim University combines strangely elongated, ultra-stylised visions of high-end German brands with highly functional, albeit strictly sci-fi, concepts for personal mobility. The latter relies on a still fantastical idea - '3D nano-spray' - but the basic idea, that we're heading towards a future where design is effectively removed from the studio and placed in the hands of ordinary people. Aside from the Kino concept, Lai has also extrapolated new forms for Bugatti, BMW and Citroen, all imbued with his own organic approach.

Most inspired by: 'Japanese Anime and Alexander McQueen.'

www.chrisfuturestudio.blogspot.com

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Christopher Lai

Pforzheim University, Germany

Transport

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Fernando Ocaño

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

Mexican designer Fernando Ocaño describes design as a 'communication method,' a way of creating messages that challenge the status quo. At London's RCA, Ocaño worked on complex extrapolations of the Citroen and Hyundai brands, breaking down the messages behind their recent design renaissance to see how far their formal language could be pushed. His projects include radical formal versions of Hyundai's 'fluidic sculpture' and an ultra-small, literally flexible Citroen city car. Finally, his 'Monoform' project attempts to reinvent the moving object, doing away with the conservative symbolism applied in modern automotive design. 'There will be always be car brands based on traditional concepts of luxury,' says Ocaño, 'but the true 21st century automobile will connect mobility to the innovation of the digital era - it will reinvent our notion of "the car"'.

Most inspired by: 'Braun, Muji and Vitra; Daniel Rybakken; Eduard Meier shoes.'

www.fernandoocana.co.uk

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Fernando Ocaño

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Ido Baruchin

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

Ido Baruchin used his RCA training to break down the role of the car in the city, stripping personal mobility of almost all traces of brand recognition in order to start from scratch. His 'Ultimate Urban' system is a public transportation network formed from a host of small vehicles, dubbed 'Poxels'. Arguing that 'design' needs to stop being just 'a different word for styling', Baruchin's work fragments the form and structure of personal mobility back into its core components. Ultimate Urban is perhaps an extreme example of his thinking, a circular pod for individual travel that is designed to use the underground network. Other works stay above ground, like the E-Motion concept for a citywide electric scooter share scheme.

Most inspired by: 'Human behaviour; the natural world; designers like Yves Béhar or Isambard Brunel, who work in an honest way towards the wellbeing of society.'

www.idobaruchin.com

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Ido Baruchin

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Ido Baruchin

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Ido Baruchin

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Ido Baruchin

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Ido Baruchin

Royal College of Art, UK

Transport

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Max Ostap

Art Center College of Design, US

Transport

Max Ostap's final year work at the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, looked at how one of the youngest marques in today's auto market could evolve. His 'Tesla: Current' project envisages the evolution of the Californian electric carmaker as it moves away from sports models and saloons into a new transport infrastructure. The 'Current' is designed for dedicated zero-emission high-speed lanes with integral wireless charging. 'All the technologies used by the car exist today in functional form,' Ostap explains, 'the vehicle is designed to be used and perceived the way we use and perceive private jets.' When conceiving his work, the designer keeps a weather eye on emerging consumer technology, mindful of the increasing crossover between the auto and electronics industries.

Most inspired by: 'The designs of futurist Syd Mead; the work of Danish designer Anders Warming, of BMW and now Mini.'

www.maxostap.blogspot.com

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Max Ostap

Art Center College of Design, US

Transport

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Max Ostap

Art Center College of Design, US

Transport

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Max Ostap

Art Center College of Design, US

Transport

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Max Ostap

Art Center College of Design, US

Transport

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Metin Kaplan

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

Umeå Institute of Design Advanced Product Design student Metin Kaplan has been exploring new ways of getting off the ground. As well as collaborating with fellow Umeå students Terry Lim and Niklas Palm on the 'Aurora Spacelines' concept, Kaplan's own student portfolio includes the 'Sunrise', a solar-powered thermal airship. Now working at Gothenborg's Epsilon Design Studio, he describes 'automated and self-sustaining' systems of nature as being his primary inspiration. His airship project is pitched at the slow aviation market - 'aerial filming, patrolling, observations, sightseeing.' Completely solar powered, the Sunrise eschews scarce helium in favour of solar-heated air for lift, using lighthouse lens technology to focus the sun's rays into heating up the balloon.

Most inspired by: 'Nature; the original Beetle, Mini and Vespa.'

www.metinkaplandesign.blogspot.com

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Metin Kaplan

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

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Metin Kaplan

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

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Metin Kaplan

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

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Metin Kaplan

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

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Niklas Palm

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

Niklas Palm's 'Mini Packman' concept turns the popular auto brand into a purveyor of modular transport solutions. 'The inspiration was the idea of compact living,' he explains, 'with an adaptable interior.' As Palm's thesis project for the MA Transportation Design course at the Umeå Institute of Design, the Packman was the result of dense research into the brand's heritage and character, concluding that a slice of functionalism, pared back yet rich in form and materials, would be a fitting way to continue the Mini legacy in the decades to come. Keen to a see more product design-based approach creep into car design, Palm quotes Frank Lloyd Wright: 'form and function should be one, joined in a spiritual union, as a guiding principle.'

Most inspired by: 'Dieter Rams and Jonathan Ive, as well as Peter Schreyer's recent overhaul of Korean brand Kia.'

www.formin.blogg.se

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Niklas Palm

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

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Niklas Palm

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

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Niklas Palm

Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden

Transport

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Clare Freeman

From PR to insider hosting

Travel

Plus One Berlin offers travellers not only a well-appointed place to stay in Kreuzkölln, Berlin's latest hip district, but the chance to connect with a like-minded local who can give their ‘plus one' guest an insider's experience of the city. It's the brainchild of 29-year-old Clare Freeman, former PR manager for the Design Hotels group. She charges a fixed rate for accommodation – a remodelled apartment in a 1970s residential building – and this includes a choice of insider advisers from Freeman's network of locals. She hopes to expand the concept, incorporating further apartments in Berlin, as well as other European cities, over the next five years.

www.plusoneberlin.com

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Dirk Dreyer

Music manager-turned-hotel manager

Travel

Dreyer worked in the music industry for the likes of Sony, EMI and Universal for 20 years. He was constantly on the road, ‘earning air miles, driving fancy cars and staying in nice hotels'. But after starting a family, his lifestyle became a state of permanent homesickness, so when he was offered the job of manager of the Lux 11 and Weinmeister hotels in Berlin, he jumped at the chance. ‘A lot of the people I used to work with now stay in our hotels and I have the advantage of knowing their needs and wishes from first-hand experience, especially when it comes to flexibility and short notice changes. We speak the same language.'

www.the-weinmeister.com

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Javier Marca Zamora

Art director-turned-baker

Travel

Until recently, Zamora was a graphic designer and art director, working for the likes of Spanish Vogue and GQ in Madrid, until he discovered the joys of making his own bread. Now he is on a mission to bring back an appreciation of good, handmade bread to locals and visitors alike. Through his website, he organises classes and events, as well as offering support to like-minded baking fans. He is also about to open his own artisan bakery in Madrid. ‘Before, when I was sitting at my desk in front of a computer, I had no direct relationship and no feedback from the final customer,' he says. ‘Now I build a close relationship with my clients, helping them, via e-mail or social networks, to overcome any doubts and to not get discouraged with any early difficulties.'

www.bakmadrid.com

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Kitchen Guerilla

Creative agency driven by food

Travel

Hamburg-based agency Kitchen Guerilla ‘hijacks' diverse locations, from ships to construction sites, with its off-the-wall catering services, then invites dinner guests via social networks, primarily Facebook. Past events range from a street food festival in a gallery space in Istanbul's Beyoglu district and cooking homemade burgers in a half-decorated Hamburg restaurant to serving meals to Basel's refugee community. The growing company's two founders, Koral Elci and Olaf Deharde, are a product designer and photographer respectively by trade. And, being multi-talented creatives, they document their cooking and dining trips all over Europe in a constant stream of small films that are designed to reflect the community feel of their venture to a growing network of friends.

www.kitchenguerilla.com

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Vincent Marino

Bar manager-turned-music consultant

Travel

Marino is currently the general manager at the speakeasy-style Experimental Cocktail Club (or ECC, see W*145) bars in Paris and London, but it is music that really makes his heart beat faster. He has decided to combine both his passion and his profession by adding to his repertoire a bespoke music playlist service for ECC, as well as other bars, restaurants and events. A well-travelled polyglot (he speaks French, Spanish, English and Italian), Marino spent 12 years touring the world, soaking up music cultures. He hates mainstream global pop, and is always on the lookout for ‘the coolest, the least known and the happiest' tracks he can find. The advantage of being in the bar business is that Marino doesn't need to advertise – he has an appreciative captive audience who, if they really like what they hear, can commission their own compilation directly from him.

www.experimentalcocktailclublondon.com

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Al White

Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, UK

Visual Communication

Like something out of Pink Floyd: The Wall, Al White's composites use Eastern European modernist architecture and apocalyptic imagery to convey a dark, otherworldly atmosphere. But while the instant hit is raw, a closer look uncovers a delicate, intricate collage. 'I like to keep the function of the structures, the meaning of the typographic symbols or the destination of the vessels at least partially covered in mystery,' says White, 'even to myself.'

Most inspired by: Paul Noble's Nobson Newtown, Anselm Kiefer, Peter Doig, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Kafka, Italo Calvino, STL, Shackleton, Werner Herzog, David Lynch

http://alwhite.tumblr.com/

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Alice Tabuchi

Central St Martins, UK

Visual Communication

What makes Alice Tabuchi's 'Colour Project' series so brilliant, in every sense of the word? She achieved the vivid hues from six raw pigments, which she transformed using a recipe she developed herself from classical references, into screen-printing ink. Deft origami folds in the material create a very 'precise' colour-blocking effect.

Most inspired by: 'The objects and art pieces that surrounded me growing up.'

www.alicetabuchi.com

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Andrea Andersson

Beckmans College of Design, Sweden

Visual Communication

There are many layers to the work of Swedish graduate Andrea Andersson, and not just because she favours collage. Her projects radiate a surreal quality, as if 'ceci n'est pas un…' should be written below. 'Humour is important in most things I do,' says the part-time photographer. She describes the internet as like a massive flea market, from which she collects articles, photos and colour schemes for inspiration.

Most inspired by: 'Jockum Nordström; actual flea markets.'

andrea.andersson@beckmans.se

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Anna Haas

Werkplaats Typografie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

'Basically with each work I start all over again,' says Anna Haas, whose clients include Nike and Der Spiegel. 'Often I have the feeling that I have forgotten everything I knew before. One of my tutors once looked at some early sketches and declared: 'It looks like you've never done any design before!' And then suddenly the pieces fall together.'

Most inspired by: 'Designwise it's got to be Eikes Grafischer Hort, the people in the studio and Eike König himself. Novels, human history and strange, outdated science museums.'

www.annahaas.ch

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Armando Veve

Rhode Island School of Design, USA

Visual Communication

Armando Veve's 'Pine Cone Land' is a large giclée print created by virtually wrapping the black and white data of a stippled landscape drawing around a cylinder. 'Flexible, flamboyant and sharp, the handmade mark is like barbed wire,' says Veve. 'Lines and dots tattoo with their rigor. Through careful observation in conjunction with a playful revisiting of academic drawing, the empty wall or page becomes a site for a warped, fantasy space where I am the architect, cartographer, creator and destroyer.'

Most inspired by: 'Everything from the absurd inventions of science fiction to the arcane, whispering lines of maps of uncharted lands.'

www.armandoveve.com

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Armando Veve

Rhode Island School of Design, USA

Visual Communication

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Benjamin Anslow

Staffordshire, UK

Visual Communication

Most students accumulate a wealth of pop-culture knowledge that serves simply to hog space in the brain best devoted to other matters. But Ben Anslow's rich personal cache serves him well. Obscure John Lennon poetry, the oeuvre of Stanley Kubrick, sci-fi… it all ends up on the Staffordshire graduate's drawing board. His 'Scapegoat', for instance, communicates a bit of graphic design trivia - that the human eye can see up to ten-million colours - in a deftly contoured paint-by-numbers. Anslow earned accolades from the International Society of Typographic Designers for his graphic interpretation of the Victorian satirical novella 'Flatland'. 'I ended up making the book about three times,' he says. 'Then I was told by the university tutors that I was the first student from my course to get somewhere in that competition.'

Most inspired by: 'Music and film throughout history.'

www.benjaminanslow.co.uk/

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Benjamin Critton

Yale School of Art, US

Visual Communication

In addition to artists and designer, Benjamin Critton describes himself as 'typographer, writer, editor, curator, speaker, stylist, publisher, printer, producer, buyer, vendor, publicist and performer.' He is interested in vertical integration within art and design practices. His pamphlet, 'Sit Down and Shut Up', accompanied a lecture he gave about 12 modernist chairs used in Yale University. It provided a walking tour of the New Haven campus, indicating the location of the furniture mentioned in the lecture. 'In this way, otherwise unattainable objects could be sat upon and enjoyed as well as questioned and interrogated,' he says.

Most inspired by: 'Typographer and calligrapher Irving Bogen, designer and animator Robert Abel and Lina Bo Bardi.'

www.benjamincritton.com

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Benjamin Critton

Yale School of Art, US

Visual Communication

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Benjamin Critton

Yale School of Art, US

Visual Communication

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Benjamin Critton

Yale School of Art, US

Visual Communication

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Benjamin Critton

Yale School of Art, US

Visual Communication

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Benjamin Critton

Yale School of Art, US

Visual Communication

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Boris Van Den Eynden

Werkplaats Typographie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

Van den Eynden collaborates with Lieven Van Speybroeck as ‘Oliver Ibsen', a fictitious Scandinavian. The duo mainly focuses on printed matter from posters and handouts for stage plays, films and exhibitions to t-shirt designs and corporate IDs. They have also been known to dip into product design like their ‘spoon flute'- cutlery that can be played as an instrument.

www.oliveribsen.com

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Boris Van Den Eynden

Werkplaats Typographie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

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Boris Van Den Eynden

Werkplaats Typographie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

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Boris Van Den Eynden

Werkplaats Typographie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

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Boris Van Den Eynden

Werkplaats Typographie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

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Daniel Samson

London College of Communication

Visual Communication

This alternative type specimen (to showcase a font's main features) eschews letters on a page in favour of wooden blocks bearing strokes in regular, bold, italics and so on. Samson's work focuses mainly on typography. ‘My work is very pared-back,' he says. He is currently freelancing, but sees himself working in an interactive, information-based field with a strong typographic focus.

Most inspired by: ‘Music, films and art, from a graphic point of view.'


www.danielsamson.com

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Daniel Samson

London College of Communication, UK

Visual Communication

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Dawn Gardner

Havering College, UK

Visual Communication

'Regenerating via recycling' is how Dawn Gardner describes the effect of her evocative vintage imagery. 'A pattern, word, sight or sound can say so much without saying anything specific and have meanings and associations that will naturally fluctuate depending on an individual's memories.' Gardner's final project at Havering, called 'Image/Word/Sound', was a digital layering of 'visual musings' from vintage books and magazines - and won her an internship with Landor.

Most inspired by: 'Schwitters, Julien Pacaud, Wim Crouwel, Jan Tschichold.'

dawngardner_3@hotmail.com

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Dawn Gardner

Havering College, UK

Visual Communication

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Dawn Gardner

Havering College, UK

Visual Communication

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Dawn Gardner

Havering College, UK

Visual Communication

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Ellie Wintram

Central Saint Martins, UK

Visual Communication

Runner up in this year's Association of Illustrator's new talent award, Ellie Wintram's degree-show work includes book covers and print-making, but we were taken with her four-series work The Beauty of Geometry. 'I would describe my worked as quite crafty and generally tactile and playful,' she says.

Most inspired by: 'Three-dimensional illustration and interactive art.'

elw4@hotmail.co.uk

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Ellie Wintram

Central Saint Martins, UK

Visual Communication

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Ellie Wintram

Central Saint Martins, UK

Visual Communication

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Fernando Rodrigues

Central St Martins, UK

Visual Communication

He may have begun his career at Apple's Genius Bar, but the brand's simple Garamond and Myriad fonts did little to restrain Fernando Rodrigues. To the Central Saint Martins grad, typefaces are more than the sum of their parts, as you'll recognise in one of his most vibrant posters. Between formative stints at Jeremy Tankard Typography and APFEL, Rodrigues proofread an edition of the Brazilian constitution while back home for the holidays. 'Having to make sure the text was precisely the same as published by the government was an extremely interesting mental exercise.'

Most inspired by: 'Pretty much everything I've done and seen. My work and my life are pretty close.'

fernando@rodrigues.com

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Fernando Rodrigues

Central St Martins, UK

Visual Communication

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Fernando Rodrigues

Central St Martins, UK

Visual Communication

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Fernando Rodrigues

Central St Martins, UK

Visual Communication

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Fleur Isbell

Bath Spa University, UK

Visual Communication

To create her wallpaper pattern, Isbell created a simple computer programme that recorded the reactions of people listening to a track by former Wallpaper* guest editors Kraftwerk. A Bath Spa University Graduate, Isbell also enjoys using traditional methods like darkroom photography and letterpress.

Most inspired by: ‘Typography, maps and systematic design.'

www.fleur.isbell.net

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Fleur Isbell

Bath Spa University, UK

Visual Communication

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Haakon Spencer & Matthew Fenton

ECAL, Switzerland

Visual Communication

Haakon Spencer and Matthew Fenton are British designers who work in London having graduated from the Masters Program in Art Direction and Type Design at the ECAL, Lausanne. 'Verities' is a publication of thought, observation and reflection on the visual arts and writing, which explores new ways of seeing the most ordinary and over looked situations, revealing the arresting and the irrational in the everyday. Recently our work has become progressively more intuitive, based on how we both feel about a project rather than following the current disposition within design for rules and restraints.'

Most inspired by: 'Edward Johnston, Eric Gill, Stanley Morrison, Le Corbusier, Charlotte Perriand, Guy Debord, Allan Kaprow.'

W: www.verities.co.uk

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Haakon Spencer & Matthew Fenton

ECAL, Switzerland

Visual Communication

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Haakon Spencer & Matthew Fenton

ECAL, Switzerland

Visual Communication

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Hannah Montague

Royal College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

'Finding beauty not always in the thing itself but in the pattern of shadows it creates' is Hannah Montague's creative ambition. She is inspired by Junichiro Tani's early-20th-century writing on aesthetics, which compares the West's constant search for light with the Eastern 'appreciation of shadow and subtlety'. You'll see shades of this in her dynamic typefaces, particularly 'Morph', designed for the RCA's Arc magazine, which gradually mutates along with the graphic content of the publication.

Most inspired by: 'Lech Majewski.'

hannah.montague@network.rca.ac.uk

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Hannah Montague

Royal College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

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Hannah Montague

Royal College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

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Henrik Eriksen

Beckmans College of Design, Sweden

Visual Communication

The top Beckmans graduate dropped out of school at 17 to design at an Oslo advertising agency and scored his first client before he'd even sat down. 'I remember feeling terrified, yet oddly confident,' he says. Based in Stockholm, Eriksen has already worked in five different advertising agencies and travelled extensively. Currently freelancing, his work spans advertising, design and drawing to moving images and photography.

Most inspired by: 'Experimental Jetset, Tadao Ando, Joy Division, the Danish poet Søren Ulrik Thomsen and my mother, Armin Hofmann.'

www.henrikeriksen.se

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Henrik Eriksen

Beckmans College of Design, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Henrik Eriksen

Beckmans College of Design, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Isabelle Vaverka

Werkplaats Typografie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

German graphic designer Isabelle Vaverka has been living and working in the Netherlands for the last six years, having first studied at the Art Academy and then at the Werkplaats Typografie, both in Arnhem. Pictured is an image from a project called 'The Book', born from her fascination with the division of content and form. 'For "The Book" I created artifacts of my own book collection, focusing on the memory connected to these objects or their physical condition,' she says. 'The bookshelf has been adapted to underline each book's position, and to house an archive of memories; 2009.'

Most inspired by: 'Alvin Lucier, Max Frisch and Gordon Matta-Clark.'

www.isabellevaverka.net

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Isabelle Vaverka

Werkplaats Typografie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

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Julia Pott

Royal College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

Animator Pott's film Belly is a distinctive and disturbing rumination on the idea of feeling an emotion, whether good or bad, in the pit of your stomach. A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Pott is part of ‘Treat'- a collective of animators and illustrators, and is also signed to New York production company ‘Hornet', supported by ‘Passion Pictures' in London. Among her clients are the band Bat for Lashes, J. Crew and Toyota. She describes her work as: ‘employing awkward animated characters to act out their inner confusions.'

www.juliapott.com

[1311599545001]

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Katie Scott

University of Brighton, UK

Visual Communication

Scott's nature-inspired illustrations have already been commissioned as album artwork for the Bombay Bicycle Club and have also appeared in The New York Times. ‘My work plays with ideas of scientific uncertainty and speculation, ‘ she says. Winner of the ‘best sketch book' award in her final year, Scott is currently working freelance, but also aspires to collaborate with The Natural History Museum.

Most inspired by: ‘I often draw influences from traditional medical and botanical illustration, in both aesthetic and subject matter.'

www.katie-scott.com

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Katie Scott

University of Brighton, UK

Visual Communication

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Katie Scott

University of Brighton, UK

Visual Communication

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

For his project 'ABC Pictograph Fonts', Kyuhyung created four new fonts that tell stories without the text necessarily being readable. 'In the history of letters there have been many ancient forms of pictorial symbols that evolved into a few of our present day alphabets. With this project, I was interested in inventing a new system of images to represent letters. The resulting fonts are less readable, but can be used for a dress, wallpaper (pictured), fabric, all with their own stories. People can wear their favourite poem, their family names or a love letter.'

Most inspired by: 'The combination of Western and Eastern aesthetic viewpoints.'

www.kyuhyungcho.com

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

[1300193482001]

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Kyuhyung Cho

Konstfack, Sweden

Visual Communication

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Lauren Gentry

Duncan of Jordanstone, UK

Visual Communication

The vintage poster art of Tom Eckersley and Abram Games, Hanna-Barbera cartoons of the 1960s and 1970s, 'Bewitched', 'Tintin'… it's all fodder for Lauren Gentry, whose heritage-hued posters look like they belong in London's Transport Museum. Her textural vector graphics have already won the illustration graduate a contract with Daunt Books, who recently republished Mark Twain's 'American Drolleries' with a cover designed by Gentry and David Pearson.

Most inspired by: 'Abram Games, Tom Eckersley.'

www.laurengentry.com

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Lauren Gentry

Duncan of Jordanstone, UK

Visual Communication

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Mael Fournier Comte

Royal College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

Fournier Comte's drawing of the Seegmuller building in Strasbourg is part of an ongoing series of works investigating uncanny architectural forms. Comte has now teamed up with Samuel Bonnet under the company name SA|M|AEL. They focus on editorial design, typography, drawing, visual identity and signage, and they are already collaborating with a slew of cultural institutions and brands.

www.maelfourniercomte.com

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Marine Duroselle

Royal College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

Lima, New York City, Paris and now Shoreditch: the many homes of Marine Duroselle have informed her work, from clusters of triangles shaped like celebratory bunting in the colours of Peruvian embroidery to typefaces that mimic old French printed literature. It's no wonder so much of her work features or resembles the flags of the world. Before graduating from the Ecole National Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, she worked with Philippe Apeloig and Antoine+Manuel. Last year she set up a graphic-design practice in London and began on a series of alphabet books. The books have become, she says, 'a laboratory to combine and sequence words and images, super-positions of old and more recent printing techniques.'

Most inspired by: 'Peruvian textiles, New York's DIA Beacon Museum, Sheila Hicks, Arthur Bispo do Rosario, Robert Rauschenberg, El Greco, Philippe Millot, David Hockney's late work.'

www.marineduroselle.com

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Marine Duroselle

Royal College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

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Meryn Cobbin

University College Falmouth, UK

Visual Communication

A self-styled 'digital collagist', Meryn Cobbin uses her reactions to visual and audio stimuli to guide her precise tessellations. And yet, her hand-designed textures and soft gem-toned palette lend them a dreamlike quality. 'My work lies between digital and traditional realms,' says Cobbin. 'In a way I have spent the last three years trying to find my balance between both.' It's no surprise the illustration graduate says she's been influenced by architecture walks through central London and coastal strolls in Falmouth.

Most inspired by: 'Walks, music, the compositions of Olaf Hajek.'

www.meryncobbin.com

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Mia Porter

University of Brighton, UK

Visual Communication

First class honours graduate Mia Porter has developed a surreal style and an illustrative technique that no doubt grew out of her close collaborations with illustration students (she shared a studio with the illustration course while at Brighton). Her 'Synesthesia' poster series celebrating the modern composer John Barry, is a visual translation of his music. It certainly impressed former Wallpaper* publisher Alasdhair Willis, who hired her as a graphic designer at his firms Announcement Creative and the Anonymous Partner.

Most inspired by: 'Cy Twombly, Joan Miró.'

www.miaporter.co.uk

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Mia Porter

University of Brighton, UK

Visual Communication

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Mia Porter

University of Brighton, UK

Visual Communication

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Mia Porter

University of Brighton, UK

Visual Communication

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Michael James Ainscough

Leeds College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

Michael James Ainscough's works are clean and pared-down. A graduate of Leeds College of Art, Ainscough has completed internships at Liverpool design studio 'Smiling Wolf' and 'Box-head*' in Leeds. Of his approach, he says: 'I try and think out of the box, of the bigger picture and the bigger problem that has to be solved.' In the future, he sees himself opening his own studio, but for now he would most like to work with graphic designer Michael C Place of 'Build'.

Most inspired by: 'Magazines, newspapers, websites, illustrations, galleries; being around designers and in a studio environment.'

www.michaelainscough.co.uk

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Michael James Ainscough

Leeds College of Art, UK

Visual Communication

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Russell Hendrie

Kingston University

Visual Communication

Hendrie's work, ‘Election 2010' is a typographic amalgamation of opposing headlines leading up to the 2010 elections. Already an RSA Student Award winner, Hendrie collaborates with fellow student Paul Bailey, focusing on everything from iPad apps to designing Royal Mail stamps. Of his approach, he says: ‘I try to create images that I would be happy to hang on my own wall at home.' With internships at Studio Xag and Waitrose under his belt, he hopes to own his own studio in the future.

Most inspired by: ‘The people around me.'

www.smang.co.uk

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Russell Hendrie

Kingston University

Visual Communication

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Rutger de Vries

Gerrit Rietveld Academie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

De Vries' work 'Duplex' is a stencil typeface with each letter divided into two and able to be used as two typefaces or combined as one. ‘My projects are a visual representation of my thoughts,' he says. He is currently studying for a master's degree at the ‘Werkplaats Typografie' in The Netherlands.

Most inspired by: ‘Anything from typography to contemporary art, politics and daily news.'

www.perongeluk.com

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Senghye Yang

Central St Martins, UK

Visual Communication

If you follow the work of avant-garde fashion designer Claudia Catzeflis, you may have seen Senghye Yang's lookbook for a recent collection, its technicolor photography and retro landscapes spliced with gem-toned diamond shapes. Yang overlaps obscure imagery with mid-century pop themes in saturated colours.

Most inspired by: 'Ray Johnson, Rene Magritte, Tim Burton, Alain de Botton.'

www.senghyeillust.com

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Simone Koller

Werkplaats Typographie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

Koller's supplement for Architectuur Lokaal references a 1965 pamphlet by the architect critic Geert Bekaert about London Zoo's elephants. Koller started her career by working with the Zurich design company ‘Elektrosmog' for three years before making the move to Amsterdam to study at Werkplaats Typographie. Now with her own practice, the Zurch and Amsterdam-based designer focuses on designing books, identities and websites.

www.simonekoller.com

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Simone Koller

Werkplaats Typographie, The Netherlands

Visual Communication

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Toby Milner-Gulland

London College of Communication, UK

Visual Communication

For his family of fonts, Milner-Gulland created a 338-page book to show the different pattern combinations that each letterform could potentially appear as. Currently freelancing, he creates websites, applications, identities, books and typefaces. ‘My typographic work has a strong focus on systems, programming and pattern,' he says.

Most inspired by: ‘The desire and need to learn.'

www.trm-g.co.uk

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Toby Milner-Gulland

London College of Communication, UK

Visual Communication

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Toby Milner-Gulland

London College of Communication, UK

Visual Communication

Alfonso Simelio Jurado

FAU USP, Brazil

Architecture

Alfonso Simelio Jurado was born in Spain and kicked off his architecture education at the Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid. He completed his degree at the Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da Universidade de São Paulo (FAU USP) in 2010 and for the last two years he has been working for Metro Arquitetos, involved in large and prestigious projects like the new Leme Gallery and a new public school. He was awarded the 2011 Opera Prima Student National Award for his graduation thesis on student houses in Republica Square in São Paulo. 'My most important influence was my school and its own way of looking at architecture, which was partly inherited by modernist masters such as Vilanova Artigas and Paulo Mendes da Rocha,' says Jurado. 'Another great influence is Metro Arquitetos where I have learned most of what I know in the field.'

Most inspired by: 'SANAA, MVRDV and I would have loved to have worked with Foreign Office Architects.'

alfonso@metroo.com.br

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