Maslow’s Mortimer House shakes things up in London

Maslow's Mortimer House by AvroKO
The AvroKO-designed Maslow's Mortimer House opens in London
(Image credit: press)

With remote working on the up, a host of spaces are jostling for attention to accommodate the progressive work patterns of London's creatives. Until now this has meant either leisure-focused membership clubs or corporate-lite co-working spaces, but Mortimer House is shaking things up.

Billed as a premium workspace and wellbeing destination by founder Guy Ivesha, the seven storey Fitzrovia site presents itself as a work/life hub meant for both creating and unwinding. Led by the ‘Hierarchy of Needs’, a concept developed by the venue’s namesake — the American psychologist Abraham Maslow — the multipurpose setting is organised with theories surrounding human motivation and happiness in mind. As such, the sprawling space expands to include an all-encompassing gamut of work areas, a restaurant, a gym, yoga studio and a communal floor, set over four storeys.

Global design outfit, AvroKO, has taken its cues from Maslow’s theory and applied it to the art deco building, with marble mosaics, plaster mouldings, and terracotta ceilings all uncovered and celebrated. Elsewhere, the ‘social belonging’ level of the Hierarchy is applied to co-working areas, where private spaces, bureaus and meeting rooms are arranged to aid productivity and social connection in equal measure. In the Living Room and Den, self-confidence and curiosity inform an aesthetic where both vintage furniture and modern furnishings by AvroKo, Twenty Twenty One and Gubi pepper an explorative floor that spans a central bar, mid-century library and an outdoor balcony.

Visitors seeking a literal taste of Maslow’s theories without the commitment of membership are welcomed to the ground floor Mortimer House Kitchen, headed by Lello Favuzzi and a series of guest chefs. Here, amongst mid-century interiors and newly added period-specific details, diners are served a menu of simple and vibrant Mediterranean dishes that spark levels of delight and contentment that Maslow would surely be proud of. 

Maslow's Mortimer House public space, London, UK

Both public and private areas in the house’s co-working spaces are designed to facilitate social connections thanks to a mix of plentiful seating and domestic furniture

(Image credit: press)

Maslow's Mortimer House co-working space, London, UK

With neutral palettes and simple aesthetics, the mood of house’s co-working spaces is shaped by tenants rather than complex design

(Image credit: press)

Maslow's Mortimer House co-working space, London, UK

Critall windows, original 1930’s parquet floor and Fitzrovia views come together in the house’s 6th floor penthouse-style Loft & Gallery

(Image credit: press)

Maslow's Mortimer House co-working space, London, UK

Designed to foster a range of activity, every facet of the members lounge encourages human curiosity amongst an eclectic mix of modern and vintage furnishings

(Image credit: press)

Maslow's Mortimer House co-working space, London, UK

ith 180 dedicated desks and a total of 23 offices, Maslow’s Mortimer House presents a full-fledged workspace in the heart of London

(Image credit: press)

Maslow's Mortimer House co-working space, London, UK

Haptic fabrics and a surplus of greenery encourage hours of repose and study in the house’s numerous public and private lounge areas

(Image credit: press)

Maslow's Mortimer House co-working space, London, UK

Defined by original marble mosaics, concrete columns and terracotta ceilings, Mortimer House Kitchen fulfils the most basic needs of Maslow’s Hierarchy

(Image credit: press)

Maslow's Mortimer House co-working space, London, UK

Accenting the fifth floor’s central bar, mid-century library and fireplaces is an outdoor balcony offering vistas of Fitzrovia

(Image credit: press)

INFORMATION

Website

ADDRESS

37-41 Mortimer Street

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Melina Keays is the entertaining director of Wallpaper*. She has been part of the brand since the magazine’s launch in 1996, and is responsible for entertaining content across the print and digital platforms, and for Wallpaper’s creative agency Bespoke. A native Londoner, Melina takes inspiration from the whole spectrum of art and design – including film, literature, and fashion. Her work for the brand involves curating content, writing, and creative direction – conceiving luxury interior landscapes with a focus on food, drinks, and entertaining in all its forms