Mood board: Creating a ready-to-wear offering for a shoe brand is a hard task without the added pressure of a legacy stretching back to 1895. The Parisian house only introduced clothing in 2011 and it has become known for a playful take on luxury dressing thanks to designer Alessandro Sartori. In September last year it was announced that the Colombia-born designer Haider Ackermann would replace Sartori as creative director. His hallmarks, from more than a decade in fashion, are well-established. The jewel toned velvets, cropped pants and long unstructured coats he showed for his Berluti debut were new for the house yet totally faithful to his own oeuvre.

Finishing touches: Days before the show, Ackermann shared three moody short films via the brand’s Instagram page. They depict a young man wandering through the streets at night and along the Seine in the early hours of the morning. The muse is both romantic and modern, with images of the full moon and brutalist architecture mingling with rippling water patterns, a swan, a clenched fist, and the man pensively scanning the sky. The new look for Berluti was decidedly raffish yet still committed to elegance and comfort. The models sauntered the runway, some with custom-made guitar cases on their backs, or exotic skin attachés clutched at the hip.

Best in show: Standout were lace-up boots in an almost-black emerald green, a black leather aviator jacket with a splash of red crocodile on the lapels and a deep red lining, and a beautiful cashmere sweater with a large roll neck. Made out of a single piece of cloth with just two seams, it is a modern classic.

RELATED TOPICS: BERLUTI