No one has influenced the changing face of contemporary art quite like Charles Saatchi. Now, in this first-ever chronicle of the Saatchi Gallery since its opening in 1985, the full effect of his pioneering curatorial eye is felt. The weighty leather- and cloth-bound volume reads like a Who's Who of the art world over the last 25 years.

Publisher Edward Booth-Clibborn and designers Value and Service have kept the look of the book as clean as possible to ensure the 900 or so images do the talking. To this end, the text on each page is kept to a minimum.
Divided into 28 sections such as 'Young British Artists', 'The Revolution Continues: New Art from China' and 'Abstract America: New Painting and Sculpture', each charts an exhibition period in the gallery's history from 1985 to 2010. Featuring every single artwork that has ever been in Saatchi's gargantuan art collection would have been virtually impossible, so the book offers a digestible (yet still impressive) selection of 732.
Between pages are cloth-bound inserts of commissioned essays by art critics Richard Cork and Brian Sewell, Sir Norman Rosenthal (former secretary of exhibitions at the Royal Academy of Art) and an amusing bit of prose by actor Steve Martin.