G-Star RAW disrupted a market flooded with lifeless, heavily treated jeans with the introduction of 3D denim in the mid-1990s. Using additional leg panels and darts, the process treats garments as if they are objects, resulting in a fit and silhouette that is articulated, bold and closer to the body.

Last year, the brand set up an internal innovation laboratory at its Amsterdam HQ, led by the designer Aitor Throup, whose approach is as equally focused on engineering as the latest fad. The resulting 20-piece capsule collection explores the two polar opposite states in the life of a denim garment. It uses the same Italian selvedge fabric both in rigid, loom-state raw denim and bleached to complete white. ‘I am always trying to design things that capture ideas as metaphors,’ Throup says. ‘I really loved this challenge of trying to harness what “raw” means. The idea of doing the whole collection in raw denim meant that we could explore the lifetime of that fabric.’

A classic parka has an integrated, detachable backpack; jeans have hidden pockets. A denim jacket has straps at the back, allowing for it to be carried when not in use. Throup’s approach is exploratory. ‘My brain is constantly obsessing with building product from the inside out. When you build things anatomically, the surface can only be informed by the process that came before it. RAW Research is a place to think of new possibilities. Just how far can we push jeans?’ You’ll be able to see for yourself when the collection launches in November.