Summer on the American east coast is largely characterised by one major migration pattern: weekly sojourns to eastern Long Island and the Hamptons. The Herzog & de Meuron-designed Parrish Art Museum, located in the town of Water Mill, takes full advantage of both weather and the crowds of the season by staging an exciting survey of site-specific art projects on water. Entitled ‘Radical Seafaring’, it is the first museum to do so; presenting a variety of experiments, journeys and installations in a range of disciplines within its stylish halls.

With work from 25 international artists and collectives on display, ‘Radical Seafaring’ represents a new mode of expression that addresses concerns such as changing weather patterns, rising sea levels and migratory changes. Andrea Grover, the Century Arts Foundation curator who organised the show, says, ‘The increasing number of works created on the water by contemporary artists is approaching the critical mass of a movement like land art. The "offshore art" projects represent a new form of expression that is especially powerful when one considers that half the world’s population live within 200 miles of a sea coast.’

The exhibition has been divided into four themes: exploration, liberation, fieldwork and speculation, which touch on the notions of self-reliance, gathering research on the environment, using waterways as a platform to build other realities and seeking out new experiences. With works by Chris Burden, Atelier Van Lieshout, Buckminster Fuller, Vik Muniz, Dennis Oppenheim and Swoon, spanning the period 1968–2016, the showcase is a poignant reminder of the world’s changing reality.