Parajumpers’ creative director Massimo Rossetti is a quintessential example of the pioneering spirit that his outerwear brand represents.

A designer for 45 years and a sailor for ten, the passionate Italian spends his spare time aboard his vintage 1934 Californian sailing boat, which he purchased a decade ago, around the same time that he co-founded Parajumpers with Ermanno Paulon.

Rossetti brought the yacht back to Italy from San Diego, and it is the co-star of Parajumper’s latest travelogue Stories film series. From Arctic surfers to Alaskan Iditarod mushers, this outward-bound series has profiled many kindred adventurers this year, and for its latest installment it’s dropped anchor off the deep blue coast of Sardinia with Rossetti.

‘Stories is about boundary-pushing personalities who are inspired and driven by everyday beauty, something we often tend to ignore,’ explains Rossetti of the wanderlust series. ‘We want to give them a voice, to let them tell their very own stories – stories that become the filter through which we define our dreams, goals and possibilities at Parajumpers.’

For Rossetti, life is something to be conquered. There are always new roads to be explored, new relationships to be forged and stories to be shared. But it’s being on the water, riding the waves, where this creative feels most alive.

‘The sea has always been my biggest dream,’ says Rossetti, whose life has been action packed from day dot, having been born in a Turin bomb shelter during the war. ‘On the sea I feel complete. It’s a liberation for me,’ he shares.

Christened ‘Orsa Grassa’ or ‘Fat Bear’ in English, his boat was inspired by ‘Corto Maltese’, the main character in Hugo Pratt’s comic book, ‘The Ballad of the Salt Sea’, from which he compares himself to Maltese, who was ‘a gypsy, a sailor that travelled the world and had extraordinary adventures’.

Rossetti’s next big adventure is to sail the Atlantic Crossing with Orsa along with over 4,000 other sailors who will endeavour to cross from Europe to the Caribbean on one of the greatest sailing adventures of their lives.

He has just finished a complete rejuvenation of the 82-year-old sail boat. Following problems with Orsa’s planking, he was told if would be more energy efficient to buy a new boat, but he could not abandon ship. ‘I simply could not abandon a true love,’ he says, adding with pride, ‘She is now completely renewed. It’s finally a dream come true,’ he adds of the November race that will take her back to American waters.