What do you get when you team B&O PLAY with critically acclaimed indie band Mew? A new groundbreaking application called Sensory Spaces, best described as a journey through the sound of Mew, launched in September of this year. Simply boot up your iOS device, plug in your headphones and follow the band members’ voices through a universe filled with fragments of sound from the Mew universe.

The first thing you hear is an instrument, which you can’t really place - it is far away, almost hushed. But as you start to move towards the sound’s apparent source it gets clearer and louder until suddenly it’s there, you’ve located the instrument and unlocked a level. And then, you’re presented with the first track of the song.

You move on, searching for the next instrument and once you’ve found it and unlocked the track, it’s pieced together with the one you uncovered previously. The further you get on the treasure hunt, the more dimensions of Mew’s mysterious soundscape will be revealed to you, when finally you are left with a whole new Mew song, Making Friends.

‘Mew has always been about expanding the limits of music,’ says guitarist Bo Madsen. ‘The same thing applies to Sensory Spaces. We wanted to present something truly unique to music lovers, as well as showcase the inner mechanisms of an orchestra.’

Henrik Taudorf Lorensen, corporate vice president of B&O PLAY, explains: ‘Sensory Spaces gives you another dimension to music. You get to play around with sounds and enjoy the attention to detail that has gone into it, both in terms of the music and the equipment. This collaboration truly represents our mindset at B&O PLAY. We want to create magical experiences and engage our customers.’

It’s a pairing that has similarly inspired Mew. ‘We chose to work with B&O Play because it’s the frontrunner in hi-fi sound,’ says Madsen. ‘Mew has a meticulous approach to sound – everything has to be perfect because it’s through the sound that we transgress our emotions in the songs. So this gives music-lovers a chance to experience sounds on another level.’

Words by Oscar Lashley; Photography by Jeppe Sørensen